Unarmed Bravery in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay example

Unarmed Bravery in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay example

Length: 737 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Many Children receive Bravery Awards every year around the world, and none of them hold any weapons or punch someone in the face to prove that they are brave, unlike what the majority of people picture it. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Atticus believed that true bravery and courage is facing the negativities of life and society persistently, and by sticking to your belief no matter what the cost is. Jem and Mrs. Dubose are two characters that strongly apply to Atticus’s meaning of bravery and courage.

Mrs. Dubose was a real brave woman in the eyes of Atticus. Atticus tried to teach his children the true meaning of bravery by setting her as an example. Mrs. Dubose struggled so hard to die in the way that she wanted to die in, but she also did not ask for help although it was hard for her to fight the addiction alone. “Most of the time you were reading to her I doubt if she heard a word you said. Her whole mind and body were concentrated on that alarm clock.” (Harper Lee, 120)
In this quote, Mrs. Dubose was fighting for her dignity while she was alive by not begging for help. If Mrs. Dubose told Jem that these were her last days, he would have come earlier every day and that would ease her struggle. Instead, she chose not to do it and she ignored the pain to keep her dignity. Mrs. Dubose’s beliefs were her top priority. The actions that most people took or her personal needs did not affect her way of thinking because she had a courageous heart. “Jem, when you’re sick as she was, it’s all right to take anything to make it easier, but it wasn’t all right for her.” (Harper Lee, 120)
When Atticus set Jem as an example, he did not mean him personally but he mean...


... middle of paper ...


... of bravery and courage in the eyes of Atticus, and both Jem and Mrs. Dubose applied to his meaning. Mrs. Dubose strongly played the role of the courageous woman that fights for her dignity ignoring what other people do, and represented the person who fights alone without asking for help. Jem went through the process of growing that led him to be a responsible man who stands for his word no matter what, despite the fear that he might face by doing that or despite the bad results that could occur to him. By understanding what courage and bravery truly are, positive results could occur in society as a result of that. In the book “To Kill a Mockingbird” Mrs. Dubose was a great example of fighting addiction, and Jem was a great example of the true form of maturity, and if these examples were used well they could be set as a solution to most of the problems in the world.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Fear of Change Illustrated in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Some people hide from change thinking that it will never find them, but change is happening all around, whether it is the seasons or how people think and act things change. Sometimes though, as quickly as the world changes, there are people and things that may not change with everything else. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, there are people who refuse to acknowledge the world changing around them and try to reverse the changes that have already occurred. Two of these people afraid of changes are Bob Ewell and Walter Cunningham....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Better Essays
678 words (1.9 pages)

To Kill a Mockingbird and A Time to Kill: Similarities and Differences Essay

- A Time to Kill and To Kill a Mockingbird both have a number of similarities to be compared and contrasted. Both stories can be compared in their themes about justice and racial prejudice. However, this is where the similarities end. The themes and ideas in both novels are vastly different in shape and scope. In A Time to Kill justice is the main theme and most of the ideas are focused on justice and the gray in between the lines of black and white set by the law, racial prejudice is also touched upon very frequently in the comparisons between Jake Brigance and Carl Lee Hailey and how he wouldn't even have had to face trial if he was a white man....   [tags: John Grisham, Harper Lee, contrast & comparison]

Better Essays
824 words (2.4 pages)

The Mockingbirds in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- The significance of the store To Kill a Mockingbird is the expression mocking bird appears in the story lots of times. Also the most significant novel in this whole book is the mockingbird symbol. Another significant part of the story is the definition of a mockingbird and it is a type of Finch, it’s also a small bird who likes to sing. It got the name mockingbird because when it sings it is mocking other birds. (http://www.allfreeessays.com/essays/The-Significance-Of-The-Title-Of/21174.html) The mockingbirds in the story were Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, and Boo Radley....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, symbolism, ]

Better Essays
679 words (1.9 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee is novel set in a three year period through the ‘great depression’. Atticus Finch (Jem and scouts father) is originally portrayed as a friendly and understanding person, though when he attends court defending a ‘black man’ as his job, suddenly he and his family begin to suffer racial hatred from their community. The story features on the themes of racism, community morals and the realisation of certain truths whilst growing up. It is a fascinating novel with a great storyline full of drama and unexposed realities....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee]

Better Essays
1077 words (3.1 pages)

Hope in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay

- To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is extensively a story of hope. Hope is to wish for something with expectation of its fulfilment and to have confidence; trust. This is shown through the themes, issues and the characters in the novel. Atticus represents hope, he is optimist. He is from the higher class and defends the lower class and still has the anticipation to win. The Finch family has hope as Atticus has taught his children to be accepting and have open-minds. Racism and prejudice, give people the hope for change....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee]

Better Essays
925 words (2.6 pages)

Essay on The Mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

- Walt Whitman’s 1859 poem “Out of the Cradle Rocking Endlessly” depicts the mockingbird as a symbol of innocence that chants or sings of fond memories from the past. By contrast, Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960, written almost a century after Whitman’s poem, portrays the mockingbird as innocent but as a fragile creature with horrific memories – memories of discrimination, isolation, and violence. Harper Lee wrote her novel, which is rooted in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, in the Deep South, during a time of segregation and discrimination, social issues which can be seen not only in the novel but were witnessed by Harper Lee in her own life....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Better Essays
1988 words (5.7 pages)

Essay about The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

- “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy.” Those were the words spoken by Miss Maudie Atkinson. She tries to tell Jem about why mockingbirds should not be killed. Although there are many characters in the novel, the mockingbirds that were the most obvious in the story were Tom Robinson, Boo Radley, and Mrs. Dubose. Even though there are many other characters to choose from, the most obvious mockingbirds are Tom Robinson, Boo Radley, and Mrs. Dubose. The way that Boo Radley was (theoretically) killed (by society), is the fact that he is not extremely religious....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Better Essays
555 words (1.6 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Would you rather read a boring novel that contains static characters or would you want to read one that takes you on a journey through a dynamic character's life. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout's personality greatly changes as she matures and learns more about life. This novel takes place in the 1930's in a typical southern society. Once Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, Scout faces many challenges and she discovers numerous facts about life. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout grows up and learns that one should not be prejudiced toward others, the true meaning of courage, and that it is wrong to harm the innocent and kind....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird]

Free Essays
1137 words (3.2 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a highly regarded work of American fiction. The story of the novel teaches us many lessons that should last any reader for a lifetime. The messages that Harper Lee relays to the reader are exemplified throughout the book using various methods. One of the most important and significant methods was the use of symbols such as the mockingbird image. Another important method was showing the view through a growing child's (Scout Finch) mind, eyes, ears, and mouth....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays]

Free Essays
1401 words (4 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and was adapted into a play by Christopher Sergal and published in 1980. It tells the story of a court case when a black man gets accused of raping a white woman. The black man, Tom Robinson is defended by the a lawyer called Atticus Finch. Atticus is one of the few people in Maycome who have a bit of money an can read and write very well. The inevitable outcome of the case was that the Black man was sentenced to death....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays]

Better Essays
2334 words (6.7 pages)