Essay on TV Pop Culture: Cognitive Malignancy or Brainpower?

Essay on TV Pop Culture: Cognitive Malignancy or Brainpower?

Length: 1914 words (5.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

American pop culture has come a long way in the last few decades: from the rock 'n’ roll boom of the fifties, to the hippie aesthetic of the seventies, to the electronic age of the nineties. Pop culture clearly fluctuates at a rapid pace and even though fads have come and gone, one thing has remained viable even in more contemporary times: the TV set. On top of that, never has the world seen a greater peak in technology than it has in recent years, and the television is no exception. Unfortunately, as fascinating as these advancements may sound, it is generally presumed that the television—as with much modern pop culture tech—has had and continues to have detrimental effects on Western culture. Given that the TV has been a predominant force for the last sixty years, it’s safe to assume that most have heard the pervasive statement of how television "rots your brain.” By contrast, the benefits of this technology are rarely discussed and when the topic does arise, it seems to be hastily dismissed as “phooey.” Despite these labels, some would argue that television pop culture not only provides a form of recreational relaxation, but also has the potential to enhance cognitive capabilities.

Obviously the television isn't a new technological development; it's been around since at least the turn of the 1920’s and was readily available for public sale by the late 1930’s (Stephens). After the Second World War, the television expanded with its introduction into the commercial mainstream, and by 1955 it was estimated that roughly half of all American homes had at least one (Stephens). Although certainly impressive, this statistic would only continue to burgeon throughout the decades with the rise of color TV and cable b...


... middle of paper ...


...th Readings. 2nd ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012. Print.

Johnson, Steven. “Watching TV Makes You Smarter.” Graff, Birkenstein, and Durst 277-94.

Stevens, Dana. “Thinking Outside the Idiot Box.” Graff, Birkenstein, and Durst 295-98.

Herr, Norman. "Television & Health." The Sourcebook for Teaching Science. California State University Northridge, 2007. Web. 9 Mar 2014.

Rotfeld, Herbert. "Understanding Advertising Clutter & the Real Solution to Declining Audience Attention to Mass Media Commercial Messages." Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23. Auburn University, 2006. Web. 16 Mar 2014.

Stephens, Mitchell. "History of Television." Grolier Encyclopedia. New York University, 1998. Web. 4 Mar 2014.

"TV Dramas Leading Genre for Prime Time Viewing, Ad Dollars." MarketingCharts. Watershed Publishing, 20 Apr 2012. Web. 15 Mar 2014.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Pop Art : The Pop Artist Essay

- Pop art is anything one can think of. An artist can take a box of crackers, put the box in lighting that looks mysterious, take a picture and call it art. Pop art can be as simple or as complex as the artist chooses. Trying to explain pop art is like sitting in an English class where the teacher analyzes every object as a symbol and every word in the book has an algological meaning. We will never really know what the artist’s motives are without directly asking the artist. During the 1960’s, Andy Warhol became a famous pop artist with his loud screen prints and paintings of Marilyn Monroe and his Campbell’s soup can series (Art Story)....   [tags: Andy Warhol, Pop art, Roy Lichtenstein]

Powerful Essays
1027 words (2.9 pages)

Pop Of Pop Art : Andy Warhol Essay example

- Pop of Pop Art Andy Warhol is the pop of pop art. Andy changed the way artists and spectators perceived art. Warhol wanted to be a painter but is most famous for his silk screen prints. Warhol’s life is very interesting from his birth, to his big break to his influence on the art world after he passed. Andy Warhol’s biography Andy Warhol’s early life Andrew Warhol (as he was known at that time) has the traditional rags to riches story. Andy’s parents migrated from what is now Slovakia to Pittsburg....   [tags: Andy Warhol, Pop art, Art, Campbell's Soup Cans]

Powerful Essays
1215 words (3.5 pages)

The Korean Wave in Pop Music Essay

- Korean music has changed dramatically over the past decade, most recently in the craze with pop. This essay will focus on the Korean Wave with emphasis on K-POP in terms of the sound history and culture it has created. I argue that a music genre has never been this successful in penetrating the outside world and combining culture. As this music genre is relatively new, just two decades, the traditional sense of the music must be taken with a grain of salt. I will space this paper out into three areas as stated above, touching on the history and culture, the sound itself, and performance of the genre....   [tags: K-pop, music genres]

Powerful Essays
1495 words (4.3 pages)

Pop Culture Argument Essay

- According to Dabrali Jimenez, of the New York Times in a recent article on Goth Lolita Culture “There is a world in which the childhood fantasy of Alice in Wonderland seems to collide full force with the Addams Family” Jimenez, D (2008) p. CY4 of the New York Times Edition: A new generation of Lolita’s makes a fashion statement, Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/28/nyregion/thecity/28trib.html?_st=r=1&scp=3&sq=gothic%20lolita&sce&oref=slogin Goth started out to be cute young women with bows, polka-dots, and strange virtual designs on their clothing....   [tags: Pop Culture]

Powerful Essays
1089 words (3.1 pages)

Korean Pop means Famous Music Essay

- Most people hear the word “pop” and assume that the traditional sense of the genre. Through the thinking about the top of 40 singers flooding the airwaves such as Rihanna or One Direction are similar (leslie, June,2013). So when people hear the word “K-pop,” usually there will be a misconception that it means the same kind of music, but only they often develop the misconception that it means the same kind of music only in Korean. Actually, K-pop is not simply pop. The name “K-pop” means a popular music....   [tags: K-Pop Music]

Powerful Essays
1206 words (3.4 pages)

Essay about Korean And Korean Pop Culture

- The Korean wave refers to the phenomenon of Korean history, Korean entertainment, popular culture. Korean wave also known as “Hallyu” in Korean. This term is now widely used to refer to the popularity of Korean across asia and other parts of the world. Hallyu was first founded by Chinese press in the late 1990s. It was used to describe the growing popularity of Korean pop culture in China. Korean pop culture usually made up by several parts like, Korean pop music, Korean drama and Korean movie rolling over the world....   [tags: Korean wave, K-pop, Korea, Korean drama]

Powerful Essays
1156 words (3.3 pages)

Madonna and Pop Culture Essay

- I stand for freedom of expression, doing what ever you believe in, and going after your dreams. -Madonna Even though she is a big influence other artist have influenced too. Should Madonna be getting all of the fame. Why does everyone look up to her as a big influence. Was she really the biggest influence to Pop Culture? Madonna Louise Ciccone was born August 16, 1958 to Madonna Louise Ciccone and Silvio Ciccone. Her family was a big strong strict family in the world of Christians. She had to do everything in the name of the father....   [tags: Madonna Louise Ciccone, Pop Star, Biography]

Powerful Essays
1071 words (3.1 pages)

Pop Star Showdown Essay

- From “the heart breaker” to smoking weed on stage, pop culture has really taken a turn for the worst. Madonna was the type of girl who partied with the best of them but didn't do anything that could possibly ruin her career and health. Miley Cyrus, on the other hand, is a wild child who does what she wants and could care less about her social image and physical self. These two pop stars also have many things in common as well. But, from looking at the individual lives of Madonna and Miley Cyrus, there is a noticeable difference in pop culture over time....   [tags: Madonna, Miley Cyrus, Queen of Pop]

Powerful Essays
1403 words (4 pages)

Essay about Changes during the Pop Art Movement

- Changes during the “Pop Art” Movement “Pop art” was a 20th century art movement that utilized consumerism and popular culture. Andy Warhol, for example, changed the imagery of everyday objects, as well as entertainment figures, through distorted shapes, sizes, and bold colors. As the decades passed, the style of “pop art” slightly changed as well. Later artists, such as Tom Wesselmann and Allen Jones presented their subject matter in a more shocking perspective. Women, and more specifically their bodies, were often the target of graphic manipulation....   [tags: Andy Warhol Pop Art]

Powerful Essays
996 words (2.8 pages)

Pop Art1 Essay

- Pop Art1 The birth of Pop art (short for Popular art) emerged in England between the years of 1950 and 1960, but heightened to its full potential in New York. Pop art was a form of rebellion against Abstract Expressionism. Pop artists felt that “Abstract Expressionism was an elite art, to which only a tiny class, mainly of painters and poets, could respond” (30 Compton). Pop artists also considered them pretentious and over-intense and at the same time, only selling to the greedy middle class....   [tags: Essays Papers, informative, pop art]

Free Essays
316 words (0.9 pages)