The Transatlantic Slave Trade, Political, Social And Economic Environments

The Transatlantic Slave Trade, Political, Social And Economic Environments

Length: 1894 words (5.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Question 1:
During the transatlantic slave trade, the political, social and economic environments of West and West Central Africa were all based on a goal for the survival of family, community, and, most of all, culture. There was profound diversity in the political structures found in this area, which impressed a paramount impact on the economic and social activity of each society. As these societies were so different, whites were able to justify enslaving West and West Central Africa’s populations through the idea that they were unworldly because they were based in rural agrarian isolation and needed to be taught differently and saved from that way of life.
The political structures of this area included both strict and relaxed groupings of people. The forms of political structures included groups loosely affiliated through ancestry, groups more strictly united by a culture and lineage, kingdoms strictly bound under a central male dictator, or those juxtaposing bounded into small isolated villages with governing male councils. Though men were always the face of a governing body in West and Central Africa, women had vital roles in all of these structures, a contrast to the strict male domination of the European whites. The villages and stateless familial societies commonly linked together from matrilineal lineage and the dictators of the Sudanic kingdoms had female counterparts that attended political meetings and gave advice. Though women had overall higher ranking, polygamy was widely practiced in this general area. Whites took offence to the marital multiplicity and were enraged to observe varying polytheistic religions or Islamic influence in the areas.
The class structures for the kingdoms, villages, and larger stateless s...


... middle of paper ...


...s compromise, the social superiority of whites over African slaves is apparent. The majority of the United States felt that slaves were inferior to whites and deserved no voice, rights, or consideration. In fact, many of the Founding Fathers had slaves themselves and believed in white supremacy and slave inferiority themselves (Pavao). This ideology was certainly most fervent in the South and the Founding Fathers clearly had too much intelligence to even consider freeing slaves in the United States at this time.
The Founding Fathers failure to abolish slavery was not their fault, but simply a product of the political, economic, and social environment they lived in. Abolition was not an issue that could have been addressed when the nation was just forming because it would have prevented the coalition of colonies or ripped them apart immediately after consolidation.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Contact Between The Native Americans, Africans And Europeans Impacted The World And Course Of History

- Contact between the Native Americans, Africans and Europeans impacted the world and course of history. Predating the arrival of the Europeans, different Native American groups were scattered across the continent, each population, political, economic, and religious beliefs differing. Each group was heavily influenced by the environment and ecosystem they lived in. There was a great amount of gold in Africa, creating a source of power and large amounts of international interest. Three large empires formed from the Sudanic civilization, which was ruled by kings and princes and formed its on traditional monotheism....   [tags: Atlantic slave trade, Slavery, Caribbean, Africa]

Better Essays
1873 words (5.4 pages)

Essay The Development Of Early Colonial Slavery

- The development of early colonial America used slaves for labor because labor was scarce. Slaves played a growing role in creating the necessary labor force needed to provide economic development of the New World. While Spanish and Portuguese slavery existed, the British found it more profitable using Africans to work on plantations in agriculture and farming. They worked in fields producing bulk crops such as tobacco, sugar, cocoa, cotton, and coffee. By the latter half of the 17th century, the demand for agricultural slaves increased to keep up with market demands....   [tags: Slavery, American Civil War, Atlantic slave trade]

Better Essays
819 words (2.3 pages)

Slave Slaves And The Slave Trade Essay

- Slave Owners and Slave Traders Part in the Slave Trade Slave owners and traders have had an important part in history, but not a lot of people have considered the parts they play and how different they may be. The most obvious similarity between the two is their eyes for profit. The slave business was a very practical and profitable business in the 1600-1800’s. The men that entered this business did it for profit. Despite this similarity, there were a number of things that the two did not share, status being one....   [tags: Slavery, Atlantic slave trade, African slave trade]

Better Essays
1472 words (4.2 pages)

Essay on The Decline Of The Atlantic Slave Trade

- Slavery has been around since the dawn of humanity coming together to form a civilization. It can be found throughout history. In the age of the Roman Empire slaves accumulated to around 30 percent of their total population and consisted of barbarians that couldn’t speak their language (Walter Scheidel 2007). But the most well-known and most recent is the Atlantic Slave trade which differs from all other periods of slavery for four key reasons. The Atlantic slavery trade lasted nearly four centuries; the targeted group was black African men, women, and children (UNESCO 2014)....   [tags: Atlantic slave trade, Slavery, Caribbean]

Better Essays
1645 words (4.7 pages)

The Slave Trade And Its Results Essay

- Europeans had not really settled in Africa much but they were constantly trading along the coast, so much so that they had to set up factories (trading stations). Contact between Africans and Europeans was minimal because the Europeans could get the raw materials, like gold, ebony, rubber, and later slaves, at the coasts. The Europeans did not use brutal force to take what they wanted from the Africans because that would have seized all future trade, and they would not have the military power to overtake them until the late 19th century....   [tags: Africa, Atlantic slave trade, Slavery]

Better Essays
1389 words (4 pages)

Essay about The Trans Atlantic Slave Trade

- The seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries saw the emergence and eventual abolishment of one of the most detrimental enterprises in African history, the slave trade. The trans-Atlantic slave trade, born out of an inevitable economic push, radically changed society in African communities, particularly those of West Africa. The effects of the slave trade influenced nearly every aspect of life in Africa from the daily habits of people to the entire commercial and political system of the region....   [tags: Africa, Atlantic slave trade, Slavery]

Better Essays
959 words (2.7 pages)

Essay on Slavery And The Slave Trade

- Slavery was a legally recognized system in which people were legally considered the property or chattel of another. All slaves had few rights and could be bought or sold and made to work for their owner without any choice or pay. It is the right of some individuals, to possess, buy, sell, discipline, transport, liberate or otherwise dispose of the bodies and behavior of other individuals. Those born into slavery are assigned the status of slaves. Slavery was a legal institution in all of the 13 American colonies and Canada which was acquired by Britain in 1763....   [tags: Slavery, Atlantic slave trade, Caribbean]

Better Essays
1058 words (3 pages)

The Slave Trade And The Colonization Of The New World Essay

- 1. The conditions in the New World transformed the traditional character of the slave trade because with the discovery a vast majority of land including Mexico and Peru came gold and silver mines. In addition to the gold and silver mines, there were new discoveries like sugar, coffee and tobacco, which lead to an increase in demands for slaves. If it was not for the colonization of the New World, the early slave trade may have ceased to exist after a short period of time due to the decline in demands for slaves in Europe as the population began to expand during the late fifteenth century....   [tags: Slavery, Atlantic slave trade, African slave trade]

Better Essays
1647 words (4.7 pages)

African Slave Trade And The Middle Passage Essay

- Why did the Europeans and Americans turn to Africa for slave labor. What were the evils of the African slave trade and the “middle passage”. What impact did the slave trade have on Africa. In this paper I plan to explore why Europe who was a large colonizer of the world turned to Africa for slave labour, the issues and mistreatment that took place, and what Europe gained from use of slave labour. Europe itself was drawn to Africa not for slavery but for the wealth of resources and a shorter trade route to India....   [tags: Slavery, Atlantic slave trade]

Better Essays
1109 words (3.2 pages)

The Atlantic Slave Trade Essay

- The Atlantic slave trade was a phenomenon which was in part responsible for innovations in a number of elements of humanity. These changes were instrumental in a number of revolutions and they also induced ground-breaking changes in the ideology of mankind. This legitimisation of slavery aiding different revolutions and changing ideas may be misconstrued as the sole catalyst of the concept of modernity. However, modernity does not run on singular trajectory so it is unlikely that one catalyst would solely enable them all....   [tags: Slavery, British Empire, Atlantic slave trade]

Better Essays
1516 words (4.3 pages)