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    Zionism

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    variation can paint a contrasting picture of Biblical information. Time plays a very large part in the variations of Biblical interpretation. The interpretation according to the rabbinic midrash is very different than interpretations according to modern Zionism or for that matter modern Feminism. Classic midrash served an important purpose for the authors of the Torah. It allowed them to create a way to make the Torah an intimate part of the lives of Jews. The result of transforming Biblical stories in to

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    Zionism Essay

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    located within the same geography. It is from Eretz Israel that the Temple was destroyed and the Jewish people were expelled by the Babylonians in the 6th century BCE, never to reclaim their homeland. The State of Israel, and its backing concept of Zionism, the idea that Jewish people require a national homeland, are actually products of nineteenth century Enlightenment ideas of utopia, coupled with the Cold War politics of the major world powers. Great Britain was preeminent among the influential powers

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    zionism- Greenberg

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    English Literature at Leeds University and soon after at Bar-Ilan University, writes a detailed analysis of what he refers to as the Myth and Metaphor of the various approaches to Zionism in his book titled The Zionist Revolution. In this analysis Fisch attempts to break down several approaches to the myth and metaphor of Zionism to give the reader a sense of broader knowledge and a feeling that the field is generally covered in this article. He inevitably presents forth the opinion that he holds of highest

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    History Of Zionism

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    Collective Memory (3000) As we have seen, within Zionism a grand narrative evolved; an interpretation of Jewish history, which presented historical dichotomies between the perceived Golden Age of the Jews in Antiquity and the declining life of the Jews in the Diaspora (Zerubavel 2002: 115). The narrative advocated continuity and identification with Antiquity and contained a strong negation of the Diaspora period. Influenced by Anti-semitic depictions of European Jews, the Jews in the Diaspora was

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    The shift from classical religious Zionism to modern Political Zionism was a result of several events, intellectual, political, and religious. As European nations expanded political rights and economic opportunities to Jews there were three reactions among the intellectual elites. Some argued to remain

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    The forces that eventually gave rise to organized political Zionism were spawned by conditions in nineteenth century europe. Pinsker wrote in 1891 the Autoemancipation, which argued that antisemitism was so deeply embedded in european society that no matter what the laws said, jews would never be treated as equals. He was more interested in the issues of national identity than religion. The Jewish State, written by Herzl, claimed that Jews constituted a nation but lacked a political state in which

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    Zionism and Non Zionists

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    Zionism declares that “the Jews are more than a purely religious body, they are not only a race but also a nation” (Berkowitz 376). Theodor Herzl, the father of political Zionism, states, “We are a people- one people.” Both Herzl and Berkowitz have interesting key points about a Jewish State, the Jewish religion in general, and how to solve current issues in the religion. A State is formed by a social contract and is still being created today. Rousseau states, “The conditions of this contract are

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    Theodor Herzl: Father of Zionism?

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    Theodor Herzl: Father of Zionism? Theodor Herzl is often referred to today as the Father of Zionism, a man known for his role in the establishment of a homeland for the Jewish people. His most famous pamphlet, The Jewish State, inspired thousands of Jewish men and women from across the world, although particularly in Europe, to leave their homes to realize the glory of creating their own homeland in Palestine. While Herzl was originally a believer in the gradual assimilation of German and Austrian

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    Political Zionism and Theodor Herzl Influence

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    Zionism is a political organization that dated back in the Jewish and Judaism history; however, after 1897, Theodor Herzl is said to have redefined it the political Zionism, hence he is referred by historians as the father of political Zionism. From 1870 to 1897, the Hovevei Zion are said to have created the original 20 Jewish settlement in Palestine. Prior to the incident of the Holocaust, political Zionism main objective was to create a Jewish National Home along with a cultural center within Palestine

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    Anti-Zionism Versus Anti-Semitism: Is an Anti-Israel an Anti-Jew? Introduction The Jewish state of Israel is comprised of one quarter of one percent of the Middle East landmass and only 1.58% of its population; however, this state has been the target of anti-Semites and anti-Zionists since its conception in 1948 (Puder 1-3). As a result, anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism have been grouped together as synonyms in media sources and conversation across the globe, yet these two terms have very different

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    1. Zionism is a movement established by Jews and decedents of Jewish culture that seeks restitution in the form of a new Jewish homeland, specifically the modern day state of Palestine, which was once the sovereign Jewish land of Israel. 2. The three concepts of Judaism, Zionism, and Israel are different in many ways. To begin, the state of Israel was formed in 1948 by the United Nations as a result of the Partition Resolution, which was originally established in 1947. The Partition Resolution sought

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    Zionism is defined as "national movement for the return of the Jewish people to their homeland and the resumption of Jewish sovereignty in the Land of Israel." Political Zionism is defined as using political rights in order to reach a Zionistic end. The Jewish people use political zionism Political Zionism was coined by a man named Theodor Herzl, who found that the issue of Zionism was one that involves politics and became the worldwide leader for it. Using websites that range from the New York Times

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    Zionism

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    Zionism In the years just after World War II, Zionism (the desire to rebuild a Jewish national presence in the Promised Land) became a popular Jewish cause all around the world. Many Jews who were not practicing Judaism at all with religion became involved with the establishment of the State of Israel. Even today, many years after the successful founding of the State of Israel, there are Jews whose only real tie to Judaism is their belief in Zionism and their support for the State of Israel. They

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    under the impression that Zionism was a unified social movement; however, YPS’ lecture and the course readings highlighted that there were actually several factions within the Zionist movement, the main ones being political Zionism and cultural Zionism. Both political and cultural Zionism sought to return the Jewish people to the Land of Israel, and viewed the formation of a Jewish state as a solution to improve the status and address the needs of Jews. However, political Zionism aimed to foster the equal

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    The article written by Elhanan Yakira, “Anti-Semitism and Anti-Zionism as a Moral Question,” discusses the idea that anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism are equal. This directly goes against Bernard Harrisons essay when stating the rebuttals. It states that anti-Zionism by its nature cannot be anti-Semitic. As there are some connections between anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism, Yakira states that associated the two together may cause more harm than good. One connection between the two is the traditional

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    backgrounds). Yet in the Quran, as espoused by the Prophet Muhammad, the lands of Jerusalem are said to be the holiest of all Arabic lands. Three movements would develop in response to these deep divisions. The Zionism movement, the Arabism movement, and the Palestinian movement. The Zionism movement, as outlined by Theodore Hertzl in his pamphlet The Jewish State, concerns itself with the creation, and later preservation of the Jewish state. The Arabism movement seeks to shine light on a shared cultural

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    “The Bielski Brothers” is a story of three amazing brothers, their journey of survival and experience they faced in World War II. Peter Duffy places this extraordinary story of survival in context by describing the Bielskis lives and experiences , quoting from Tuvia Bielskis previously unknown journal, and revealing the sociopolitical history, including the anti-Semitism of Belarus, a region the Bielski Brother’s had grown up in. WWII was one of the most unforgettable events in history, an event

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    not a phenomenon unique to the Jews of the nineteenth century. Thus, and exploration of the transformation of the Jewish world in lieu of the invention of the modern world as we know it is imperative to the understanding of the development of Zionism from a passive consciousness and yearning to the emergence of the first political Zionist writings marking the beginning of an active ideological movement advocating mass immigration to Eretz Israel. The nineteenth century was a dynamic climate

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    In Eli Evan’s The Provincials and Stuart Rockoff’s piece “The Fall and the Rise of the Jewish South” the reader looks at the changing life and times for people of Jewish ancestry in the American south. Since the 1950’s, the Jewish south has experienced rife anti-semitism, a demographic shift as small town populations significantly decreased while large cities grew, and social change due to the civil rights movement. The small town south experienced an exodus of its Jewish population following World

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    ideas. For example, David Malter has modern views of his faith, whereas Reb Saunders cannot let go of traditional practices. Also, Reb Saunders and David Malter have different methods of raising their children. Finally, David Malter believes in Zionism, whereas Reb Saunders wants to wait for the coming of the Messiah to preserve his religion. Such differences can cause similar faiths to seem very different. David Malter’s modern ideas conflict with Reb Saunders's traditional practices. For

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