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    Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Zelda Fitzgerald Zelda Fitzgerald began life looking forward to what it could offer her. A popular debutante and success at everything she had yet to try enticed her to believe that she was infallible. It was only during her later life that she realized that life, both physically and mentally, had its breaking point. Though many things have been blamed as the cause of her mental breakdown, there is no specific root to her problem. Diagnosed as schizophrenic in 1930, Zelda would be condemned

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    Essay On Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Nonfiction Historical Essay: Zelda Fitzgerald To begin with, Zelda Sayre-Fitzgerald was born in Montgomery, Alabama. Zelda came from a very prestigious, wealthy family. Growing up, Zelda was a wild and rebellious child; she was very flirtatious, spending most of the time with the boys. Zelda was well-known for being a free-spirit in her Southern society. Even though she was talked about by her peers, her father’s reputation provided her with a “free card” (“Zelda Fitzgerald n.p.). Secondly, following

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    Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of famous author F. Scott Fitzgerald, lived an extravagant life. Her life may not have been well known in the same way that her husbands was, but many people still knew of her nonetheless. Fitzgerald was born on July 24, 1900 in Montgomery, Alabama. Her family was rather well known throughout the government. Fitzgerald’s father, Anthony Dickinson Sayre, served on the Supreme Court of Alabama. Zelda’s great-uncle and grandfather served in the United States Senate. Her mother

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    Ernest Hemingway and Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Ernest Hemingway and Zelda Fitzgerald Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born July 24th, 1900 to Anthony Sayre, a judge of the Alabama Supreme Court, and Minnie, a once aspiring actress. She was considered a sought-after Southern belle who had a collection of soldiers' insignia pins by the time she met Scott Fitzgerald at the age of twenty. However, Zelda refused marriage until 1920 when the publication of This Side of Paradise gave Scott the wealth and economic stability, which she demanded. The

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    Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator

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    Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator In an attempt to improve their deteriorating marriage, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald made the decision in 1924 to relocate to Europe. Soon after their arrival in the French Riviera, Scott began working feverishly on what would be The Great Gatsby, leaving him little time for family bonding. Servants tended to their only daughter, Scottie, and Zelda, with few other responsibilities, spent her days sunbathing, swimming, and playing tennis. At least this

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    tales correlates with his private life with his wife Zelda, his trouble with alcohol, and their lives in Europe. Fitzgerald wrote the story "Babylon Revisited" - perhaps his most widely read story - in December of 1930, and then it was published in February of 1931 in The Saturday Evening Post. Mathew J. Bruccoli writes in "A Brief Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald" that "The dominant influences on F. Scott Fitzgerald were aspiration...Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, and alcohol," and each of these influences are painfully

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    The Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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    In the book This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald, even though the main protagonist’s, Amory Blaine, character development is completely controlled by Fitzgerald's life, Amory goes through many changes through the story and they are born from the people Amory is around and Amory interactions with other characters are in relation to how Fitzgerald interacted and responded with others. Amory’s character seems to fluctuate throughout the novel, the more types of people he meets the more ideas

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald and His Novels: Parallels Between His Worlds of Fiction and Reality F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote about what he knew, giving readers a perfect reflection of America in the 1920’s, considering this, his fictional work is almost autobiographical in a sense. Although his topics were limited, they were written well because of his extensive knowledge of the time period, extensive knowledge of himself, and being able to express that through his writing. In his 1933 essay “One Hundred False

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    Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was a writer, American Socialite, and an artist. She is the wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald, who strongly influenced his work. Zelda’s works of literature and artwork help defined the roars twenties. Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born on Tuesday, 24 July 1900, to Minerva Bucker Machen Sayre and Anthony Dickson Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama. Her mother named herself “for a myth, was known locally as an avid reader” (Cline 1). Her father on the other hand was

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    did. For instance, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was a famous flapper who married F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of The Great Gatsby. She struggled against her traditional southern upbringing and its societal restrictions to create a new, independent identity not just for herself, but for all American women (Willett, Ericka). Zelda is still an influence in modern society today. Her name even inspired Shigeru Miyamoto to create the first-person role-playing game called The Legend of Zelda. Another influential

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