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    Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Zelda Fitzgerald Zelda Fitzgerald began life looking forward to what it could offer her. A popular debutante and success at everything she had yet to try enticed her to believe that she was infallible. It was only during her later life that she realized that life, both physically and mentally, had its breaking point. Though many things have been blamed as the cause of her mental breakdown, there is no specific root to her problem. Diagnosed as schizophrenic in 1930, Zelda would be condemned

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    Essay On Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Nonfiction Historical Essay: Zelda Fitzgerald To begin with, Zelda Sayre-Fitzgerald was born in Montgomery, Alabama. Zelda came from a very prestigious, wealthy family. Growing up, Zelda was a wild and rebellious child; she was very flirtatious, spending most of the time with the boys. Zelda was well-known for being a free-spirit in her Southern society. Even though she was talked about by her peers, her father’s reputation provided her with a “free card” (“Zelda Fitzgerald n.p.). Secondly, following

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    Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of famous author F. Scott Fitzgerald, lived an extravagant life. Her life may not have been well known in the same way that her husbands was, but many people still knew of her nonetheless. Fitzgerald was born on July 24, 1900 in Montgomery, Alabama. Her family was rather well known throughout the government. Fitzgerald’s father, Anthony Dickinson Sayre, served on the Supreme Court of Alabama. Zelda’s great-uncle and grandfather served in the United States Senate. Her mother

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    Ernest Hemingway and Zelda Fitzgerald

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    Ernest Hemingway and Zelda Fitzgerald Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born July 24th, 1900 to Anthony Sayre, a judge of the Alabama Supreme Court, and Minnie, a once aspiring actress. She was considered a sought-after Southern belle who had a collection of soldiers' insignia pins by the time she met Scott Fitzgerald at the age of twenty. However, Zelda refused marriage until 1920 when the publication of This Side of Paradise gave Scott the wealth and economic stability, which she demanded. The

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    Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator

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    Zelda Fitzgerald and the French Aviator In an attempt to improve their deteriorating marriage, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald made the decision in 1924 to relocate to Europe. Soon after their arrival in the French Riviera, Scott began working feverishly on what would be The Great Gatsby, leaving him little time for family bonding. Servants tended to their only daughter, Scottie, and Zelda, with few other responsibilities, spent her days sunbathing, swimming, and playing tennis. At least this

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    Susan Juby’s Nice Recovery is a book that candidly tells the story of an alcoholic's journey to sobriety. The novel shows how a person can be drawn into addiction from a young age, and the fight to stay sober is never easy, no matter what your circumstances may be. However, the book barely touches on why Susan became an alcoholic. When reading, it is almost believable that she simply never learned how to drink properly, and became dependent on needing to be “blackout drunk” anytime she drank. This

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    The Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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    In the book This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald, even though the main protagonist’s, Amory Blaine, character development is completely controlled by Fitzgerald's life, Amory goes through many changes through the story and they are born from the people Amory is around and Amory interactions with other characters are in relation to how Fitzgerald interacted and responded with others. Amory’s character seems to fluctuate throughout the novel, the more types of people he meets the more ideas

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    tales correlates with his private life with his wife Zelda, his trouble with alcohol, and their lives in Europe. Fitzgerald wrote the story "Babylon Revisited" - perhaps his most widely read story - in December of 1930, and then it was published in February of 1931 in The Saturday Evening Post. Mathew J. Bruccoli writes in "A Brief Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald" that "The dominant influences on F. Scott Fitzgerald were aspiration...Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, and alcohol," and each of these influences are painfully

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald and His Novels: Parallels Between His Worlds of Fiction and Reality F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote about what he knew, giving readers a perfect reflection of America in the 1920’s, considering this, his fictional work is almost autobiographical in a sense. Although his topics were limited, they were written well because of his extensive knowledge of the time period, extensive knowledge of himself, and being able to express that through his writing. In his 1933 essay “One Hundred False

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    Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was a writer, American Socialite, and an artist. She is the wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald, who strongly influenced his work. Zelda’s works of literature and artwork help defined the roars twenties. Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born on Tuesday, 24 July 1900, to Minerva Bucker Machen Sayre and Anthony Dickson Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama. Her mother named herself “for a myth, was known locally as an avid reader” (Cline 1). Her father on the other hand was

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    did. For instance, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was a famous flapper who married F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of The Great Gatsby. She struggled against her traditional southern upbringing and its societal restrictions to create a new, independent identity not just for herself, but for all American women (Willett, Ericka). Zelda is still an influence in modern society today. Her name even inspired Shigeru Miyamoto to create the first-person role-playing game called The Legend of Zelda. Another influential

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    Francis Scott Fitzgerald

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    Francis Scott Fitzgerald Thesis: Francis S. Fitzgerald was a talented writer; his only flaw was that he liked the combination of alcohol and the night life. One of the most widely recognized writers of the 1920’s and 1930’s was Francis Scott Fitzgerald (Beebe 339). He followed his dreams of being a writer, until he finally succeeded. Francis Scott Fitzgerald was a talented writer; his only flaw was that he liked the combination of alcohol and the nightlife (Coale 190). He spent his life

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald

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    The “Jazz Age” was a term F. Scott Fitzgerald coined to describe the ostentatious era that began after World War I during the Roaring Twenties. It was a joyous time full of great prosperity. He published many famous books during this time like The Great Gatsby and Tender is the Night. Fitzgerald claimed to know a great deal about the glitz and glamour of the Roaring Twenties, while he never actually experienced those aspects himself. Although F. Scott Fitzgerald had many struggles with alcoholism

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    The Swiss Sanatorium

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    is a fabrication, and its very foundations have compromised its goodness,” Linda De Roche argues in her article explaining the false ideas behind the sanatoriums that the character Nicole Diver, from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Tender Is the Night” and Zelda Sayre, Fitzgerald’s wife, experienced during their rehabilitation (De Roche 50). The article makes connections to the false concepts that the public received about the mentioned sanatoriums in Switzerland. Sanatoriums, as researched by De Roche, created

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    that it is normal (Fitzgerald 178). As Gloria's and Anthony's situation worsens, their arguments become more extreme. They progressively drink more and their drinking becomes consistent. He becomes obssessed with alcohol and relies on that to get rid of his sadness and his problems. Anthony's alcoholism drives him to ruin and self-destruction. When Fitzgerald's characters achieve and gain their desired possession, the object seems to lose their symbolic importance. Fitzgerald shows that distance

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    nature of Fitzgerald’s ‘Romance’ (as he had originally subtitled the book)” (Fitzgerald ix). Tender Is the Night parallels Fitzgerald’s own struggles with his mentally ill Zelda, and the characters are carefully constructed from his interactions with the social elite of artists, composers and Hollywood personas on the French Riviera and Rome, among other settings. From the fall of 1925 to the spring of 1934, Fitzgerald revised his fourth novel seventeen times before it was published—he was still

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    Paradise American Dream

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    spirit is bartered away for comfort, obedience and trinkets. It's unequivocally absurd.” –Zoltan Istvan. In both This Side of Paradise and This Beautiful and Damned, F. Scott Fitzgerald comments on the corruption of the American Dream. Throughout the beautiful text and prose of his first and second novels, respectively, Fitzgerald mocks the ghastly nightmare the American ‘Dream’ has become. The former follows the story of the downfall of a wealthy, promising young man struggling to gain romantic success

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood "I saw the novel...was becoming subordinated to a mechanical...art...I had a hunch that the talkies would make even the best selling novelist as archaic as silent pictures." (Mizener 165) F. Scott Fitzgerald was keenly aware of the shift in the public's interest from novels to movies. This change made Hollywood stand alone for Fitzgerald as the sole means for expressing his talent and for gaining appropriate recognition, as well as the new way to make money

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    Francis Scott Fitzgerald’s visionary writing style during the early twentieth century revolutionized a new style for other writers. “Theme is most dramatically expressed through character, and Fitzgerald used the people he created to convey his personal vision of the world” (Keshmiri 2). As Keshmiri states, Fitzgerald, unlike many other writers at the time, expresses his stories through the development of the characters. Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby and The Beautiful and the Damned illustrate the many

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    Potiki - Is Toko Maui?

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    She blew his mouth and nostrils, and with two fingers lightly massaged his chest until the mucus began to drain freely. She took a pendant from her ear and put it on the blanket beside him. ‘Tokowaru-i-te-Marama. Ko Tokowaru-i-te-Marama te ingoa o tenei,’ she said. (Grace 36) The passage above comes from the book Potiki. It’s when granny Tamihana breathes life into Toko and gives him the name of her deceased brother. In Potiki, a novel written by Patricia Grace, we are introduced to a family that

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