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    Zapatistas

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    Zapatistas For the past several years, there has been an on going movement to liberate the large population of farmers in Mexico. These farmers are fighting to win back their pro-claimed rights to their farm land. The farmers operate within an organization known as the Zapatistas. In present time the Zapatistas, with the help of the media especially the filmmaker Nettie Wild, have gained global attention towards their struggle for human rights. Many efforts have been made by outside authorities

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    The Zapatista Revolt Against NeoLiberalism

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    The Zapatista Revolt Against NeoLiberalism In the 1630’s Mayans living in the northern part of Guatemala organized in a secretive village-by-village basis and mounted an attack against the Spanish colonial rule. They drove the Colonizers out of the area and it took almost fifty years for the Spanish to reclaim it [i] . Over 350 years later the Mexican government woke up on January 1st 1994 to news of an indigenous guerilla uprising in the southern part of Mexico. Mayans had been secretly organizing

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    Understanding Zapatista Longevity

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    Understanding Zapatista Longevity When Mexican President Vincente Fox rode into office on a wave of popular support in 2000, he inherited the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas. In 1994, the largely indigenous Zapatista movement began a military campaign to protest economic and political disenfranchisement. Vincente Fox claimed that he could solve the Zapatista uprising in “15 minutes.” Like his predecessor, he has failed to solve the problem. How did the Zapatistas achieve such longevity in the

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    Transnational Networks of Support for the Zapatista Rebellion Globalization, the term used to describe the dominant framework of international relations following the cold war, is affecting many aspects of politics and social experience. This is seen in the Zapatista rebellion and movement in Chiapas, Mexico that has benefited from globalization and transnational support. This paper examines the relationship of transnationalism and social movements with the Zapatistas as a case study. In particular, this

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    themselves as the Zapatista Army for National Liberation and their spokesman, Subcomandante Insurgente Marcos, quickly became a minor world celebrity, renowned for his communiqués denouncing the Mexican government and advancing the Zapatista’s case. The rebellion in Chiapas and subsequent stalemate were portrayed the world over as a battle between those opposed to globalization, the Zapatistas, and those in favour of globalization, the Mexican government. Those who claim the Zapatistas are anti-globalization

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    Zapatista Prospects in a Changed Environment

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    Zapatista Prospects in a Changed Environment 1994, from the depths of the jungle an ill-equipped army of indigenous farmers storms the state capital of Chiapas, Mexico demanding reform and a shift from neo-liberalist policy. 2002, fast-forward nearly nine years to present and the struggle of this rag-tag guerilla army continues, only the global and national environment has changed. With dramatic internal and external shifts, the hope of a resolution favoring these rebels representing the impoverished

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    The Successes and Failures of the Zapatista Movement On January 1, 2004, over one thousand people in the mountain hamlet of Oventic, Chiapas, celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) rebellion with song and dance. Thus, it seems a fitting time to take stock of the successes and failures of the Zapatista movement in the context of its original goals. While the EZLN has been able to establish thirty eight autonomous indigenous communities in Chiapas

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    The Zapatista Movement

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    maintained the racial assimilation and exclusion policies left behind by the colonists, including gender roles (Moore 166) . México is historically and continues to be a patriarchal society. So when the Zapatista movement of 1994, more formally known as the Ejército Zapatista de Liberación National (Zapatista Army of National Liberation; EZLN) constructed a space for indigenous women to reclaim their rights, it was a significant step towards justice. The Mexican government, in haste for globalization and

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    The New Zapatistas

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    The New Zapatistas The leader of Mexico's Zapatista rebels said Saturday that he would come out of hiding in the southern jungle and travel to Mexico City to restart peace talks that have been stalled since 1996. The ski-masked Subcomandante Marcos made the statement a day after Mexico's new president ordered a push for peace, pulling back some troops from Zapatista strongholds and sending a rebel-backed Indian rights bill to Congress. In a news conference deep in the southern Lacandon

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    In this paper, I will evaluate globalization and show how its negative effects are widespread: how it affected Chiapas and how the Zapatistas fought back, how it affects South American women working on the banana republics and how it ravages the environment. The idea of globalization is a greatly misconstrued, detrimental policy to those countries and people outside of the North American sphere of life. Corporations are globalizing not only to reduce production costs, but also to expand markets

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    Zapatista Movement in Mexcio

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    The Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas, Mexico got worldwide attention on January 1, 1994, when they marched to Mexico City against the signing of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The free trade agreement was intended to facilitate trading between Canada, United States, and Mexico. The Zapatista claimed that this agreement would affect the indigenous people of Chiapas by further widening the gap between the poor and the rich. In this paper I will examine the NAFTA agreement and the

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    The Zapatista movement occurred near the end of the 20th century where there was a technological and digital boom. These advances have helped the Zapatistas in a unique way and this resulted in their revolution to be completely different from past revolutions. The creation of network identity and communication transfer using the internet has contributed to the Zapatista’s success. Identity was an integral part in past revolutions, but it was redefined during this movement. Subcomandante Marcos’s

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    The very first time I ever heard about the Zapatistas, I was in middle school. I remember seeing them on the news as well as hearing about them from my family members. 9I did not fully understand what the whole organization was about until I asked my aunt—a high school history teacher—informed me about the struggles of the indigenous living in Chiapas and how they declared war against Mexico around the time I was born. I was astonished. I asked myself: how can anyone declare war against their very

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    Chiapas, the Ejercito Zapatista de Liberacion Nacional questions globalization and calls for the reorientation of Mexican economic policy along traditional socialist lines and the transfer of political power from elites to the mass of poor Mexicans. NAFTA and its Effects in Mexico Th... ... middle of paper ... ...ppens when a government fails to produce public services like minimal public health care, and educational/economical opportunities? You have the emergence of the Zapatistas and a dialectical

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    The Zapatista Timeline

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    the Cessation of Hostilities” ("Zapatista Timeline," n.d.). After much deliberation, the Zapatistas, and the government sign the first set of accords, called “The Dialogue of San Andres,” which are national reforms regarding the Indigenous Rights and Culture. As the accords get sent to through the political ladder when it finally reaches President Zedillo to sign, he formally rejects the San Andres Accords. This only leads the “peace process into crisis” ("Zapatista Timeline,"

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    decided that they wanted to back the constitutionalists so the helped give them weapons and funds to support the against the Zapatistas and Vallistas. The united states plan worked and the Constitutionalists took control of the presidency in 1914. To bring some sort of stability Carranza decided to meet with the leaders of the 2 rebel groups to hear what they wanted but the Zapatistas and Villistas decided to join together to take over mexico city instead and it was successful. The unexpected happened

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    The Struggle of EZNL In Modern Mexico

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    The Struggle of EZNL In Modern Mexico Introduction In so few words, the Zapatistas are a people united in the struggle for the rights and dignity of the indigenous people of Mexico. They are a group composed of the natives to the land of the state of Chiapas, the southernmost and poorest state in Mexico, which primarily consists of the tribes of the Mayan peoples. The conditions that these indigenous people live in are a testament to the injustices caused by the spread of colonialism and

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    The Struggle of the Zapatatista Movement: Seeking a Solution after 10 years "There hasn't been much change. We're still poor," Isaac [A Zapatista Rebel since 1994] acknowledged, as he cast a glance over [his hometown’s] wooden shacks and shoeless children. "But at least now people are aware. -Isaac, Zapatista Leader Since the Beginning (CNN Wolrd Article) Introduction: The indigenous community of Chiapas, Mexico has been struggling for hundreds of years, ever since the inception of the

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    The Mexican State of Chiapas

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    to the violent clash of the Old and New Worlds ever since European explorers set foot on American soil in 1492. In particular, the Mexican state of Chiapas has resisted the desecration of Mayan culture for the past 500 years, culminating in the Zapatista Revolution that began on New Year’s Eve of 1994. This paper seeks to explore both the chronology of the Mayan fight for political and educational autonomy, as well as detail the historic reformation of the past decade. Mayan culture is one of

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    A Place Called Chiapas

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    was not by accident that the Zapatista movement began in Chiapas as the struggle between ranchers, landowners, and subsistence farmers was intensified by NAFTA. The thinning middle class associated with this tremendous dualism leaves us further disco... ... middle of paper ... ...litary group and the Zapatistas at bay, and the true power of the media becomes as glaringly clear as the conflict it can spur. On camera, the “Peace and Justice” party accuse the Zapatistas of violence. Off camera, they

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