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    Love of Life and Fear of Death in the Works of T.S. Eliot and Yulisa Amadu Maddy Both T.S. Eliot and Yulisa Amadu Maddy have experienced difficulty and hardship in life. Eliot lived through two world wars and Maddy struggled with oppression and poverty growing up in his homeland of Sierra Leone. These life experiences are reflected in their writing. Both of these writers present the reader with the concept of human mortality in such a way that not only is the fear of death prevalent in their

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    Life Lessons in Yulisa Amadu Maddy’s No Past, No Present, No Future An age-old cliché states that one really never appreciates what he or she has until it is gone. Does this mean that nobody has ever truly appreciated the gift of life while living? Such an assumption cannot easily be made because no one can truly know the experiences or feelings. One can only try to understand by relating it to personal experience. On the other hand, this cliché would seem to explain the changes that people

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    Death and Dying in T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land and Yulisa Maddy’s No Past No Present No Future I am immortal. Although I realize that I will die, I don’t believe it. The fear of death motivates me to ignore my mortality and, in motivating me to ignore, allows me to live a jaded, happy life. If death were a predominant thought, then appreciating life would seem difficult—unless of course I changed my name to Harold. Everyone confronts the idea of death sooner or later; different people just deal

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    The Connection of Mortality with One’s Love of Life in T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland and Yulisa Amadu Maddy's No Past No Present No Future Through many writers’ works the correlation of mortality and love of life is strongly enforced. This connection is one that is easy to illustrate and easy to grasp because it is experienced by humans daily. For instance, when a loved one passes away, even though there is time for mourning, there is also an immediate appreciation for one’s life merely because

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    T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy's "No Past, No Present, No Future" Time and circumstance change everything. When we are young, the world is fresh, exciting, and pure. As people age, we begin to realize how corrupt the world is. Our old center, one based on trust, breaks down. Everyone in the world is looking out for their personal well-being, not the well-being of others. With this knowledge, people’s perspectives change. Rather than trusting every thing, we question the

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    How Mortal Life Heightens the Appreciation of Life in Eliot and Maddy Mortal loss and the appreciation for life are very important concepts in writing. Both T.S. Eliot and Yulisa Amadu Maddy use this concept very heavily in their writing styles. T. S. Eliot’s major theme in The Waste Land surrounds death and World War One. The title The Waste Land, gives the reader a feeling of being lost in a world of waste and hopeless causes. The first part of the poem, The Waste Land, is titled, "The Burial

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    A Handful of Optimism

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    the good and the bad with a handful of optimism. Works Consulted Eliot, T. S. The Waste Land, Prufock, and Other Poems. New York: Dover, 1998. Life Application Study Bible. Trans. New International Version. Grand Rapids: Zondervan Maddy, Yulisa Amadu. No Past, No Present, No Future. 1973. , Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann-Reed, 1996.

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    Cultural Decay in T.S. Eliot’s poem "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy’s novel NO Past, NO Present, NO Future In both T.S. Eliot’s poem "The Waste Land" and Yulisa Amadu Maddy’s novel NO Past, NO Present, NO Future, the characters experience a downfall. It is human nature, though, to experience some sort of self-destruction. W.B. Yeats wrote the line "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold." Humanity tends to cling to that which is most destructive to itself, whether it is intended or

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    Amathophobia

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    Amathophobia Death is the great equalizer. We all have unique experiences in life, but we each succumb to the same final fate. Rich or poor, strong or weak, exalted or scorned; everyone is humbled when faced with his own mortality. Death does not play favorites, and Death will find everyone. Though often frightening, some argue that the thought of death also heightens appreciation of life. British novelist EM Forster wrote, "Death destroys a man, the idea of Death saves him." Indeed, knowing

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    Appreciation Due to Death

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    Everyday people take their lives for granted. But after they have faced mortal loss or life-threatening situations, their attitude towards life changes. They soon come to understand that the gift of life is to be appreciated and not taken for granted. Yulisa Amadu Maddy and T.S. Eliot are two writers who through their literature prove that death can change a person’s outlook on life. Both of these authors, however, express this theory differently. For instance Maddy, author of No Past, No Present,

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