Free Youth Unemployment Essays and Papers

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    Introduction Youth unemployment is a term used for people between the ages of 15-19, that do not attend school or tertiary level and don't have any form of paid job. There are reasons causing this growing problem. These being; employers not wanting inexperienced woorkers, the low rate of pay and the transition period from education to the work force after the completion of year 12. Fortunately, there are a vast majority of "youth friendly industries". This implies that, when certain companies are

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    Essay On Youth Unemployment

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    Solving Youth Unemployment in Canada Youth unemployment is a global problem facing both developed and developing economies. The United Nations define youth unemployment as individuals between the age of 15 and 24 years not employed and actively seeking employment. Statistics only consider youths who have attained the required age of employment who are willing and able to work but without jobs. Unemployment rates raise concerns in all economies. However, the rate and trends vary from one country

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    The Problem of Youth Unemployment

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    key to how we define ourselves and to our sense of self-worth. In the UK the unemployment rate stands at 6.9% now and from the figures 19.1% are between ages 16-24. Almost one in five young people unable to find a job. Youth employment has become a long-term problem in the UK, with over a quarter of million young people have been looking for work for a year or more (Mirza-Davies 2014). And increase of youth unemployment slow down the speed of UK economic recovery, although the financial crisis of

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    Youth Unemployment Essay

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    Youth unemployment is a notable, prevalent complication in society that is typically attributed to personal misfortune, economic change and lost opportunities (ManpowerGroup, 2012). The drastic upsurge in youth unemployment rates, which presently stand at 12.7%, more than twice the aggregate unemployment rate, originally began when the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) transpired resulting in levels of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) receding along with national revenue, making it a grievous challenge for

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    Youth Unemployment and Crime in Australia

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    The causes and consequences of youth unemployment in Australia has been of particular concern within both government and private sectors for many years. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 10.9% of the total 15-24 age population was unemployed in September, 1995. This figure climbed to 15.3% in September, 2003. This evidence gives cause to the growing concern surrounding the increase in youth unemployment. For sizeable numbers of youth, its not going to get any easier to find

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    of degree holders. Educated young adults are increasingly competing for low-paying jobs with more experienced professionals, forcing many to accept positions that do not even require a college degree in order to just make ends meet. Current youth unemployment does not only presently influence adverse economic conditions, it may also lead to an imminent decrease in productivity and profits, as young workers do not receive the training necessary to compete in today’s job market. If people ...

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    Sanderson suggests that even the shocking unemployment statistics are not a clear indication of just how desperate the job market is for young people (Sanderson, Wells, & Wilson, 2015). What is rarely captured in this data is the “higher levels of underemployment amongst those young people in relatively stable employment (including those with higher level qualifications)” (Sanderson, Wells, & Wilson, 2015). Highlighting this mismatch, in 2005, underemployed individuals in their 30’s came together

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    The Minority Youth Unemployment Act: Michael Saltsman’s View of the Question of Raising the Minimum Wage Michael Saltsman, research director at the Employment Policies Institute, published his article “The Minority Youth Unemployment Act” on the Wall Street Journal’s website on February 19, 2013 in the hopes of persuading his audience, most likely those in positions to hire minimum wage workers (typically teenagers), against the idea of a higher minimum wage. He states that there is no need for

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    Having a university qualification is more important than ever, but it has never provided less of a guarantee against job insecurity or even unemployment. Recent research into the Australian labour market has shown that holding a university degree is far from a guarantee of employment in a job that actually requires a university education. Various authors have estimated that anywhere from 20% to 45% of male university graduates and 17% to 38% of female university graduates are under-utilised in the

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    ‘UK unemployment rises to 2.53 million’ The Guardian. [Online] 16th March 2011. [Accessed on 27th May 2011] http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/mar/16/unemployment-rises-to-two-and-a-half-million ‘Youth unemployment hits record high’ The Guardian. [Online] 19th January 2011. [Accessed on 26th May 2011] http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/jan/19/youth-unemployment-heads-towards-1-million

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    drug/alcohol abuse, gang violence, education gap and unemployment have significantly affected the youths. The scourge of crime and violence reportedly scarred the inner city youths, hence the NCB Foundation sought to avert some of those challenges. It has since helped by contributing to the improvement of the lives of those most vulnerable and at-risk youths. Therefore, the intention of this study is to assess the contributions of the NCB Foundation on youth in the community of Denham Town. Definition/Conceptualization

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    School Violence

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    On April 20, 1999 Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold opened fire on Columbine Highschool killing twelve fellow classmates and one teacher. School violence changes our youths morals. From bullying to peer pressure, youth are exposed to school violence everyday. What is school violence? School violence varies from accounts of “death, homicide, suicide, weapon related violence, in the US.” (c1) School violence can occur to and from school, while attending a school sponsored event, on a bus, or at an activity

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    The Transition of Youth into Adulthood.

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    Research has suggested that youth of today are taking longer to complete the transition into adulthood. Twenty-five years ago youth had more of a traditional model of transition, whereas today, the transition seems somewhat fractured. Changes in education and the benefit system may be responsible for the altered state of transition in current youth, (Keep, 2011) which is an assumption that will be investigated further. Therefore, this essay will explore youth transition and will look at how the

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    adolescence”(Clarke 2009:1) at the start of the 19th century, we have seen multiple images created in regards to youth, created both politically academically and in the mass media. For the most part these images created are portrayed as problematic and damaging to society. They very often carry negative connotations such as lazy, disaffected, binged, unruly and broken. It could even be argued that just the word “youth” used alone could be seen as a negative connotation in its own right as it’s so rarely used positively

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    Teenagers Driving Today

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    drivers liscense represented independence and freedom attained only at the cusp of adulthood, but now most are waiting to attain this “license” to independence (Copeland). In the past, this desire for independence was a driving force of America’s youth, but this is no longer the case. Today, due to new technological,economical, and societal reasons, teenagers are obtaining their licenses at older ages than generations before them had. In today’s day and age with new technologies popping up everyday

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    Short History of Gangs

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    Since the beginning of time, youth groups or gangs have been in existence. These groups have had many negative effects on society for many years. These youth groups or gangs, as they are commonly called, have participated in many criminal and illegal acts that have plagued society. They have been stereotyped with such negative names as rowdies, bad kids, troublemakers, and many other mischievous names. Some of the earliest records of gangs date back to the fourteenth and fifteenth century in Europe

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    social environment of the youth through entrepreneurship and employment opportunities. In this context... ... middle of paper ... ...trieved May 17, 2008, from http://www.e-greenstar.com/India/launch/Press-release.pdf. 8. Pearl, D., & Phillips, M. M. (2001). Grameen Bank, which pioneered loans for the poor, has hit a repayment snag. Wall Street Journal, 27(11), 01. 9. Generating decent work for young people: An Issues Paper prepared for the Secretary-General’s Youth Employment Network. (2002)

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    The Transition of Youth into Adulthood.

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    Youth of today are taking longer to complete the transition into adulthood compared to youth of twenty-five years ago. Changes in education and the benefit system may be responsible for the altered state of transition in current youth (Keep, 2011) which is an assumption that will be explored. In regards to this; this essay will cover youth transition and will look at how the restructuring of polices and legislations have affected youths transition in to adulthood. Furthermore the manner in which

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    Name Institution Annotated Bibliography Date of Submission Youth Violence and Community Cohesion 1. Aisenberg, E. & Herrenkohl, T. (2008). Community Violence in Context: Risk and Resilience in Children and Families. Journal Of Interpersonal Violence, 23(3), 296-315. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260507312287 According to this article, the root cause of violence among the youth is family. The author of the article strongly believes that violence mainly is greatly influenced by the family

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    Introduction At-risk youths are adolescents experiencing acute behavioural problems and emotional problems, causing them to be a safety liability to both themselves and others (Janis, 2002). This also impedes their ability to learn and cope in various social settings. Often at-risk youths end up incarcerated in a juvenile facility and are often labelled as a menace to our society. They are prone to suicidal behaviours that sometimes leads to a fatal outcome. According to the CDC, suicide is the third

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