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Free Young Women Essays and Papers

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    James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man presents an account of the formative years of aspiring author Stephen Dedalus. "The very title of the novel suggests that Joyce's focus throughout will be those aspects of the young man's life that are key to his artistic development" (Drew 276). Each event in Stephen's life -- from the opening story of the moocow to his experiences with religion and the university -- contributes to his growth as an artist. Central to the experiences of Stephen's

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    Women in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown

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    “Young Goodman Brown” and Women What are the attitudes of the young Puritan husband Goodman Brown toward women, of the author toward women, of  other characters in the story toward women? This essay intends to answer that question. Randall Stewart in “Hawthorne’s Female Characters” states that there are three types of female characters in Hawthorne’s writings: (1) “the wholesome New England girl, bright, sensible and self-reliant;” (2) “the frail, sylph-like creature, easily swayed by

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    Bad Women in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown

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    Few, if any, women in Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” are truly good. Even the seemingly best ones are involved in devil-worship – at least, and maybe much more. This essay intends to explore this subject of bad women in the tale. Randall Stewart in “Hawthorne’s Female Characters” states that there are three types of female characters in Hawthorne’s writings: (1) “the wholesome New England girl, bright, sensible and self-reliant;” (2) “the frail, sylph-like creature, easily swayed by a stronger

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    Mind Diminishing

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    people, various reality television shows effect American society as many become idealistic to the people on the shows. Shows such as, The Swan and Extreme Make Over are shows that completely remake and rebuild one’s outer image. Episode after episode women change their weight, nose, lips, etc. by plastic surgery hoping to become “beautiful.” Unfortunately, The Swan and Extreme Make Over make transform the meaning of beauty on the show and hypnotize many into believing that beauty comes in a certain shape

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    have nothing to do with women, like tires, cars, liquor, and guns” (Pipher, Reviving Ophelia 42). As if using women’s bodies to sell completely unrelated products weren’t harmful enough, the women used to sell these products are a far cry from what most women in America look like. The average American woman is 5’4” and weighs 140 pounds, whereas the average professional model in this country is 5’9’’ and weighs roughly 110 pounds (Barnhill 49). Consistently, women are diminished by advertisers

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    Eating Disorders and the Media

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    Eating Disorders and the Media Doctors annually diagnose millions of Americans with eating disorders. Of those diagnosed, ninety percent are women. Most of these women have one of the two most common types of eating disorders: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa (National Council on Eating Disorders, 2004). People with anorexia nervosa experience heart muscle shrinkage along with slow and irregular heartbeats and eventually heart failure. Along with their heart, their kidney, digestive

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    Teenage Pregnancy Teenage pregnancy has always been present in society. There is research stating that about half the women, born between 1900- 1910, who were interviewed were non-virginal at marriage (17 Ravoira). This contradicts some thoughts that premarital sexual behavior is something new. There was another study done in 1953, it found that one fifth of all first births to women were conceived before marriage (17 Ravoira). Even before our modern openness in discussing sexual behavior and acceptance

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    vast majority - more than 90 percent - of those afflicted with eating disorders are adolescent and young adult women (1). This has led to the popular belief that eating disorders can be attributed to social factors, specifically the heavy emphasis which is placed on thinness as a measure of physical attractiveness and feminine beauty in our culture. It is thought that women, especially young women, develop eating disorders in an attempt to conform to this ideal (1). While it is likely that such social

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    Eating Disorders: Their Dark Sides

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    today due to society’s stereotypical view of women and young teenage girls, in, but many cases’ men are affected too.First, an eating disorder is an illness that affects several of the United States population because society has driven many people to be self-conscience about their appearance. For example, eight million people in the United States suffer from eating disorders ("The Secret Language of Eating Disorders," 1). Furthermore, 3% of all young women suffer from anorexia and 3-4% suffer from

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    The Women of Young Goodman Brown, The Birthmark, and Rappaccini’s Daughter In his short stories, "Young Goodman Brown," "The Birthmark," and "Rappacciniâs Daughter," Nathaniel Hawthorne uses his female characters to illustrate the folly of demanding perfection in the flawed world of humanity. Although Hawthorneâs women appear to have dangerous aspects, they are true of heart, and thus, they cannot be fully possessed by the corrupt men who seek to control them. Hawthorne endows each of his

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