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    Woodstock Music Festival

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    Woodstock In 1970 a two-hundred and thirty minute documentary was released entitled "Woodstock." This documentary has set the standard for other documentaries to come. This documentary covers a three day festival that was held in August of 1969. The festival symbolized the ideas of the late 1960’s in terms of music, politics, and society in general. The documentary depicted the event as a major love and drug fest. Woodstock was a historic event that was the idea of four men by the names of

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    Woodstock was a three day music festival famously known for “peace and music” it happened August 15 to August 18, 1969 It was held at a 600 acre farm Bethel, New York in the Catskill Mountains. The festival created massive traffic jams and extreme shortages of food, water, and medical and sanitary facilities, it is still known today to be one of the biggest concerts in history. Woodstock drew 400,000 young people including a man named TJ Eck who was 28 at the time and had a thrive for music, Woodstock

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    The Woodstock Music Festival was a music event in Bethel, New York that changed the way people live. During August of 1969, many large crowds of American music lovers all came together to listen to the music of their favorite musicians for this huge music event. Woodstock swept the nation with not only talented musicians, but also many new thoughts and opinions on the world. This popular concert event introduced the ideas of peace, unity, kindness, and togetherness. The Woodstock Festival made a

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    Peace, Love, and Music. The Woodstock Music Festival focused on these three things. Young people came from all over the country to go to Bethel, New York in 1969 to listen to many influential musicians perform. With about 400,000 participants, the venue was packed with not only people, but with drugs, sex, and alcohol. In the end, the concert-goers left with a different view of their lives and had developed a new philosophy of understanding, peace, and love. Although there were many obstacles

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    The Woodstock Music and Art Festival

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    Woodstock represented the youth counterculture of the late 1960’s that emerged in response to inequality of minority groups, the Vietnam War, and political divisions. The people of Woodstock Nation embraced antiauthoritarianism “in pursuit of utopian visions”, using rock and roll as the ultimate symbol to rally around. The music festival, starring some of music’s biggest names, shocked the country and left a legacy of peace, love, and nonviolence. Despite bad planning, Woodstock represented the

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    about? Woodstock Music Festival, or otherwise known as the greatest music festival of the counter-culture era; but only four short months later, the music died, all thanks to Altamont Music Festival. Woodstock was a three day music festival (with a short extended fourth day), that brought together the hottest rock stars of the sixties, including: Santana, Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, The Who, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Jimi Hendrix, and many more. Woodstock took place

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    Kertesz Period 3 1969 Woodstock Music Festival At a time of social reflection, with America reacting to war in Southeast Asia, the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy (1963), his brother Senator Robert F. Kennedy (1968), and Martin Luther King Jr.(1968), the Apollo landing on the moon, and a culture of public demonstration, through Woodstock, the country was asked to question its attitudes toward drugs, sex, and the establishment. Was Woodstock simply a music festival or a sign of growing

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    Differing Views on the 1969 Woodstock Music Festival On August 15, 1969 at five-o’clock p.m., on a 600-acre hog farm in the small town of Bethel, NY, Richie Havens took the stage as the opening act at the legendary Woodstock Festival. Destined to become the largest gathering of people in one place at one time, Woodstock stood for three days of peace, love, and music amidst the horrors of the Vietnam War. Hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children made their way to the Catskills in New

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    Brief History of Rock and Roll and The Woodstock Music Festival of 1969 Throughout history, major social transformations have taken place that has changed how people perceive themselves and the world around them. With each social reformation, cultural forms and institutions also change as well as their meanings. For Example, the development of recording and electronic communication within United States capitalism spurred the unique coming together of music traditions in twentieth century United

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    Woodstock is a talked about legend. On August 16-18, 1969 Woodstock Music Festival took place on a patch of farmland in White Lake, a hamlet in the upstate New York town of Bethel. John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, Artie Kornfield and Michael Lang who all worked together to organize originally envisioned the festival as a way to raise funds to build a recording studio and rock-and-roll retreat near the town of Woodstock, New York. The longtime artists’ colony was already a home base for Bob Dylan and

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