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    Wolf Whistle

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    In his novel, Wolf Whistle, Lewis Nordan depicts a racist society. The society and the citizens within it are not only mean and nasty, but also self-absorbed. However, between narrating a loose account of a 14 year old black boy's murder and telling the stories of the citizens of Arrow Catcher, Mississippi, Nordan gives a sort of ray of hope for the future. Since the actual murder is somewhat a minor aspect of the novel, and the book lacks any real major black characters, readers may get the impression

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    maturity, civilization and wilderness, man and wolf—have the ability to be harmful and restrictive, but perhaps more worryingly, they create an ill-defined middle ground between where the rules are vague and fluid, which allows for dishonesty and deception, and Carter foregrounds the resultant proliferation of untruths as the real peril. One vehicle for clear and honest communication, however, is the narrator's changing characterization of the

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    Wolf Reintroductions

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    and habitat loss due to population encroachment, wolves were eliminated from most of the contiguous United States by the 1940s. In 1973 wolves were finally put under the protection by the Endangered Species Act, and just recently wolf populations are increasing due to wolf recovery and reintroduction projects. Within the continental United States, gray wolves once ranged from East Coast to West Coast, and from Canada to Mexico. Today only about 2,200 wolves live in the wild in Minnesota, fewer

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    Our freshman class has been studying ecology and the wolf and moose population on Isle Royale this unit. We have gone through packets and models to learn more about how organisms have relations with one another in their physical surroundings. On top of that, we have gone through case studies and videos to learn more about the wolves and moose on the island. Throughout our investigation we had built a graph showing the populations of the moose and wolves. As we reached the end of our unit, our class

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    wolves attention and she doesn't know what the wolf is thinking but she never gives up and

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    going to lay low for the time being. I am starting to get very hungry, I only packed enough food for a week and this is the eighth day that I have been gone. My father believed that you could talk to wolves, so I figured I would give it a try. The wolf just snarled at me, so I backed away and spent the next few minutes watching how it interacted with the other wolves. After watching the interaction I am feeling more comfortable around the wolves. I would really like to communicate to them that I

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    Wolf Essay

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    The wolf has often played an arguable role in people’s mind; however, in some cultures like the Native American one, the wolf is seen as a guide who can show humanity the way to get closer to their roots. In some other cultures, the wolf has been seen as the villain or as the wolf who tried to eat children or even as the one who is wearing a sheep suit to rule the real sheep to be able to eat them. However in indigenous or Native cultures, the wolf has been given a lot of great qualities. The wolf

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    The Gray Wolf

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    This report is all about the gray wolf. Its scientific name is Canis Lupis. Canis is the Latin word for dog. The genus also includes jackals and coyotes. Lupis is the Latin word for wolf. Gray wolves look similar to German shepherds, but the wolf has longer legs and bigger feet. The color of a gray wolf can range from black to white, but shades of gray are the most common. A unique feature about gray wolves is that the farther north you find them, the larger they are. Males can range from (nose-to-tail)

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    Hypotheses of the Effects of Wolf Predation Abstract: This paper discusses four hypotheses to explain the effects of wolf predation on prey populations of large ungulates. The four proposed hypotheses examined are the predation limiting hypothesis, the predation regulating hypothesis, the predator pit hypothesis, and the stable limit cycle hypothesis. There is much research literature that discusses how these hypotheses can be used to interpret various data sets obtained from field studies

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    The Gray Wolf Ecosystems

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    with, in 1995 the Gray Wolf was introduced back into Yellowstone National Park. This made the park’s ecosystem form back to it’s regular balance of the ecosystem. The balance of the ecosystem goes producer, herbivore, then carnivore. This is called the food chain and with the Gray Wolf back on top of the food chain it will help the ecosystem's balance. “Loned dispersed wolves have traveled as far as 600 miles in search of a new home”. This means that it can take a Gray Wolf up to 600 miles to find

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