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    Wise Blood Analysis

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    Flannery O’Conner’s work is filled with profound Christian imagery and themes; however, her stories are not ones of rainbows, triumph, and love. They are grotesque, disturbing, jarring, and bleak. In Wise Blood Hazel Motes devolves from self-appointed priesthood, to blind decay, then death. Enoch is a man ruled by his instincts, like an animal, who devolves into an ape-like existence. These men aren’t exactly showing the fruits of the spirit, engaging in prostitution, theft, and murder, but this

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    Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood follows Hazel Motes’ attempt to abandon his religious beliefs and establish a “Church Without Christ”. Hazel Motes and many of the characters in Wise Blood seek material prosperity, but utilize religion as a means to reach such a goal. This perversion of Christianity for materialistic objectives prevents the characters’ redemption from Christ. Specifically in the case of Motes, it is not until he has lost everything material that he finally accepts Jesus’ divine grace

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    tirelessly focuses on the idea that redemption from Jesus Christ is a poorly constructed illusion; however, O’Connor uses symbolic figures to disprove Hazel Motes’s theory of Christ’s redemption. The title Wise Blood has multiple symbolic meanings, but one of the meanings focuses on the redemptive blood of Jesus Christ. Humanity sees Christ’s sacrifice as an act that “redeemed humans from the effects of Original Sin so that all who repent of serious sins could enter paradise after physical death” (“Flannery

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    The novel Wise Blood was written by the great twentieth century author William Faulkner. The book contains two stories woven together; the story of Hazel Motes and the story of Enoch Emory. Hazel, also known as Haze, left his home for four years to serve in the army only to return to his home in Tennessee to find that the place he had grown up was completely deserted. Although he was largely affected by his preacher grandfather in his youth, he takes this opportunity to be free to live the life he

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    The Essex and Hazel Motes in Wise Blood by Flannery O'Connor In her 1952 novel Wise Blood, Flannery O'Connor presents Hazel Motes's Essex automobile as a symbol for Hazel himself. The car's dilapidated state corresponds to Motes's own spiritual decay; however, the initial quality of the car's workmanship corresponds to Hazel's Christian upbringing, which he cannot deny in spite of himself. Motes's identification with and reliance upon his car as a means of escape becomes ironic as the Essex

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    Christianity vs. Entrapment in O'Connor's Wise Blood In "The Cage of Matter: The World as Zoo in Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood," William Rodney Allen addresses the "reverse evolution" of Enoch Emery and the "inverted quest for salvation" of Hazel Motes, suggesting a parallel between the two main characters of O'Connor's novel which reinforces its theme of the utter hopelessness of those who reject or mock Christ. Allen shows that O'Connor describes the spiritually devoid characters in her book

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    Flannery O’Connor’s novel Wise Blood. Among the most familiar characteristics of Southern literature is a writing style that is based upon imagery. Another common characteristic which can be drawn from Southern literature is the struggle to understand the difference between what is real human experience as opposed to what is believed to be real, as well as the human/God relationship. Flannery O’Connor’s use of consistent imagery reinforces one of the major themes of Wise Blood – that man seems to only

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    an evil, one which encourages the basest forms of human behavior. Through individuals like Leora Watts and Enoch Emery, the author depicts people whom have reached the depths of perversion and the grotesque. Works Cited: O'Connor, Flannery. Wise Blood. Three by Flannery O'Connor. New York: Signet, 1962.

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    Wise Blood

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    Wise Blood I am not sure how to react to the novel after reading it. It has been a very confusing novel; I am not quite sure what it is saying about religion. Initially I thought that it was supporting an anti-religious aspect of life. However, the end of the novel presented a twist though the eyes of Mrs. Flood, which made me change my initial thoughts about it, turning it into a novel that seemed to say, this is what happens if you do not believe in Christianity. The novel also presented

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    In his search for Hawks, Hazel asks Enoch, “that blind man named Hawks—did his child tell you where they lived?” (O’Connor, Wise Blood 82). In this statement, the words blind and hawk stand out as being contrasting. Although Asa pretends to be blind, he really is able to see like a hawk. He seems to be physically blind, with spiritual sight; he is really spiritually myopic, with

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