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    The Path of Shelley's Winged Thoughts

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    The Path of Shelley's 'Winged Thoughts' Writing much of his poetry on the Continent, away from England where his readership lived, and dying only three years after the composition of much of his best work, Percy Bysshe Shelley had little control over the transmission of his poetry. At the time of its initial publication, “Ode to the West Wind” appeared as part of a larger volume, entitled Prometheus Unbound, also the name of its signature, featured poem which overshadowed “Ode to the West Wind

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    Winged Victory: The Nike of Samothrace

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    Winged Victory: The Nike of Samothrace The Nike of Samothrace (fig. 1) Charles Champoiseau uncovered pieces of masterfully worked Parian marble in April of 1863.1 On Samothraki, the island from which Poseidon is said to have watched the fall of Troy, these segments of stone came together to form four main sections: a torso, a headless bust, a section of drapery, and a wing.2 The sections were shaped to be assembled though the use of cantilevering and metal dowels, allowing

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    Bats

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    their lives to share food with the less fortunate. 3. The African Heart-Nosed bat can hear the footsteps of a beetle walking on sand from a distance of over six feet! 4. The giant Flying Fox bat from Indonesia has a wing span of six feet! 5. Disk-winged bats of Latin America have adhesive disks on both feet that enable them to live in unfurling banana leaves (or even walk up a window pane). 6. Nearly 1,000 kinds of bats account for almost a quarter of all mammal species, and most are highly beneficial

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    Iago the villain

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    he personifies the devil (pg. 244) this accusation comes to life as you read the play and discover for yourself that in each scene in which Iago speaks one can point out his deception. It is not clear whether Iago has a master plan or if he is just winged it moment by moment with his ultimate gain in mind. However, what is clear, and what we will point out in the following, is that Iago has the ability to use word play to say the right thing at the right time. He is quick witted and that is what makes

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    Hermes

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    The fleet-footed messenger with wings on his heels and cap symbolizes fast delivery. However, Hermes was neither originally winged nor a messenger - that role was reserved for the rainbow goddess Iris (Medusa's cousin and the daughter of Thaumys and Elektra). Hermes was, instead, clever, tricky, a thief, and, with his awakening or sleep conferring wand (rhabdos), the original sandman whose descendants include a major Greek hero and a noisy, fun-loving god. Before Zeus married Hera, Maia (a daughter

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    Modern Control Systems

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    vehicle dynamics was successfully used with specific gain values to produce a stable system built to design specifications. Introduction The design of a winged space vehicle is one that has occupied the National Aeronautics Space Administration throughout the 1950’s and 1960’s. It was not until the 1970’s that NASA put into use the first winged space orbiter. Set to this backdrop of history, we began our modest endeavor to model the wing dynamics of our spacecraft design. The goal for the final design

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    a teakettle. Looking up, I see the silver belly of a red-tailed hawk as it glides in circles below the moon. “I fly those flights of a fluid and swallowing soul,” writes Whitman. He, too, must have witnessed the swooping undulations of a ruddy-winged bird. His heart, like mine, unburdened. From my rough but solid seat in the hickory tree, I hear, at first, the sounds of Annville’s busy thoroughfare - the drone of engines, squealing brakes, the chime of a church bell. Soon, however, other noises

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    outrageous to keep his reader’s attention. Ariosto, in his Orlando Furioso, does so with winged horses and curses placed upon high ranking officials. The main character in cantos 33-35 is Astolfo, and he starts his journey by riding upon a hippogryph. A hippogryph, in mythology, is a flying animal having the wings, claws, and head of a griffin and the body and hindquarters of a horse. Astolfo rides this winged horse for quite awhile, journey through many different lands. During this time, the hippogryph

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    A Genius

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    vision of worship and hierarchy. “Relief Showing the Head of a Winged Genius” visually depicts the role of worship and deity among this ancient Mesopotamian civilization. Artwork from any era directly mimics the civilization from where it came. This particular piece with its strong emphasis on line and shape lends itself to an overwhelming sense of stylization and sophistication. Though stylized, Relief Showing the Head of a Winged Genius is also very naturalistic. Dated 883 – 859 BCE., this piece

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    The Fate of Prometheus

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    call once again on the “cruel King” (I, 50), who has sentenced him to his fate, after begging the natural world to hear his cries and not punish him, no longer to injure his bones by “burning cold” (I, 33) the chains that bind him or let “Heaven’s winged hound” (I, 33) feed upon him. His words echo his earlier sentiment, found in Aeschylus’ work, where he mourns himself, as a “spectacle of pity” (14) who must suffer the “disease of tyranny (13) . In his quest and the earlier part of his imprisonment

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