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    Where The Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls There was this boy named Billy who lives on a farm. He wants two good hunting dogs, very badly, but his Pap cannot afford any for him. Billy decides that he has to work hard, selling fruit and bait to fishermen, so eventually he has enough money for the dogs. He gives the money to his grandfather, who orders the dogs for him. Billy sneaks off in the middle of the night to go to town and pick them up. While in town, other children pick on him, but he stands

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    In the story Where The Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. Billy is willing to try his best when he wants to get the dogs. He also tries his best when he wants to get Old Dan down from a tree. Billy thinks that God helped him knock the tree down and catch the coon who was up the tree. Billy tries his best to get the dogs he saw in an ad, he found in a magazine by the lake were fishermen fish. He picked berries util his feet were covered with scratches because of the bushes. He also hunted for coons with

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    Where the Red Fern grows A novel by Wilson Rawls named Where the Red Fern Grows is the story of a boy, his two hounds (which he named Old Dan and Little Ann), and all of the adventures they shared together. A loving threesome, they ranged the dark hills and river bottoms of the Cherokee country. Old Dan had the brawn, Little Ann had the brains, and Billy had the will to train them to be the finest hunting team in the valley. Glory and victory awaited them, but sadness waited

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    “The fame of my dogs spread all over our parts of the Ozarks. They were the best in the country” (Rawls 131). This is a quote from the book Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. Where the Red Fern Grows is a book about a boy, Billy, and his two coon hunting dogs. The three of them have many adventures, and many of these adventures demonstrate the theme that change is inevitable. Firstly, the part of the book when Billy got into a fight with the kids in the town is a great example of the theme

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    Summer of the Monkeys: Jay Berry and His Conflicts OUTLINE Topic: Jay Berry Purpose: To identify the nature of the force of the conflict which Jay Berry encounters, and indicate how they help or hinder Jay Berry the protagonist in Wilson Rawls novel Summer of the Monkeys Thesis: Before Jay Berry succeeds his goal he encounters many conflicts that both hinder and help him through his amazing adventure. I.                    Inner Forces A. Help- personality traits 1. Determination 2. Confidence

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    Hegel and The Libertarians

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    ethical-political philosophy. I argue that the Hegelian political theory is of central import to the discussion between communitarians and libertarians, both in the communitarian criticism of the libertarian — mainly in Michael Sandel's criticism of Rawls — and in the Rawlsian project of a society founded in justice as equality. For if the communitarians' theoretical basis is the living of a community in terms of historical-social values, and the individualists' deontological rationality is the basis

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    Government, Justice, and Human Rights

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    relationship between justice and government, examining views on the subject expressed by traditional political philosophers such as Rousseau and Locke, as well as those expressed by contemporary political theorists such as John Rawls and Robert Nozick. According to Rawls, justice is one of the fundamental concerns of a governing body; Locke and Rousseau agree that government and justice are essentially connected. Nozick and Max Weber, however, claim that the essential characteristic of government

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    of access to healthcare should be pursued for the greatest number of people (Wilson). Utilitarianism is a theory of consequences, in which the results of actions should determine their moral value. It can be summarized by the greatest happiness principle, which John Stuart Mill describes as “happiness is desirable, and the only thing desirable, as an end; all other things being only desirable as means to that end” (Wilson). For Mill, pleasure is the prime motivator, and all beings must seek out maximum

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    Rawls Social Justice

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    As indicated by Rawls, these standards are requested; importance of the first standard (the "equivalent freedoms guideline") ought to be attained before deliberations to attain the second rule are endeavored. Further, the first piece of the second rule (the "equivalent open door guideline") goes before the second part (the "distinction standard"). The requesting of the standards proposes that, to Rawls, fairness is the most critical component of social justice. Fairness implies a reasonable appropriation

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    How Rawls was trying to correct/improve Bentham/Stuart Mills's utilitarianism and classic social contract theory;  When we think about justice, we think of doing something “the right way,” having a conduct that is just and fair; but what is the right way? Many scholars have tried to answer the best course to become a just society. One of them, Jeremy Bentham considered the best way to determine how to be a just society was to analyze what course of action would prove to be more “cost effective.”

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    Two Associations with the Unencumbered Self

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    Two Associations with the Unencumbered Self The unencumbered self separates who I am from my attributes and desires. Rawls encounters the unencumbered self in proposing both the veil of ignorance and the difference principle; both separate the subject from the attributes and ends of the subject. Rawls denies both the utilitarian and libertarian views as practical solutions, and puts forward the veil of ignorance and difference principle as a third alternative. This paper will begin with briefly

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    John Rawls and the Social Contract

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    John Rawls and the Social Contract ABSTRACT. Adapting the traditional social contract approach of earlier years to a more contemporary use, John Rawls initiated an unparaleled revitalization of social philosophy. Instead of arguing for the justification of civil authority or the form that it should take, Professor Rawls is more interested in the principles that actuate basic social institutions —he presupposes authority and instead focuses on its animation. In short, Rawls argues that “justice

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    ranging from Plato and Aristotle to the 20th century theorists such as Rawls and Nozic, all of whom discussed the universal principles of social justice. They argues that social justice and equity are reflected in having a sense of belonging which means feeling acknowledged as a person and as a member of a group or community regardless the ability, culture, religion and socio-economic status (Fraser, 1997; Bach 2005; Freiler 2002). Rawls (1971) and Fraser (1997) have developed different theories of what

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    Phil.104 Word Count: Take Home Exam # 1: Essay-2 John Rawls never claimed to know the only way to start a society, but he did suggest a very sound and fair way to do so. He based his just scenario on two principles of justice. His first principle of justice was that everyone should have the same rights as others. His following policy decision was that in the event of any inequalities, they should be to the benefit to everybody, and available to all people in the society. This original Rawl’s approach

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    John Rawls' A Theory of Justice John Rawls' "A Theory of Justice" has long been revered as a marvel of modern political philosophy. It's most well-known for the two principles of justice outlined by Rawls: (1) that all persons have an equal right to liberty; and (2) that (a) all inequalities in society should be arranged to benefit the least advantages, and (b) that all positions and offices should be open and accessible as outlined by fair equality of opportunity. Rawls' conception of society

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    features of Rawls’ property-owning democracy, and whether a liberal democratic socialism can be compatible with Rawls’ political liberalism. I argue that a property-owning democracy can be compatible with Rawlsian justice while liberal socialism cannot. I understand the choice between property-owning democracy and liberal socialism as the problem of which kind of regime is more compatible with the pluralism of modern democracies. Property-owning democracy is more compatible with Rawls’ political liberalism

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    John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples

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    John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples From its beginnings, Edward Said's Orientalism (1978) has produced conflict in post-colonial studies. Does Professor Said’s theory suggest global implications and/or strategies as Culture and Imperialism (1993) argues? Or does the East of Orientalism belong only to the Middle East and particularly to Middle Eastern studies? Is there a monolithic "Othering" at work? Or do resistive pockets exist within Western imperial discourse? Perhaps the thorniest issue

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    John Rawls and Political Liberalism

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    John Rawls and Political Liberalism Describe in detail the role that the ideas of “overlapping consensus” and “comprehensive doctrine” play in Rawl’s theoretical answer to the fundamental question of Political Liberalism: “How is it possible for there to exist over time a just and stable society of free and equal citizens, who remain profoundly divided by reasonable religious, philosophical, and moral doctrines?” (Rawls 4). More specifically, how do these concepts help to preserve the traditional

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    A Theory of Justice

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    A Theory of Justice Communitarian critics of Rawls have argued that his A Theory of Justice provides an inadequate account of individuals in the original position. Michael Sandel, in Liberalism and the Limits of Justice argues that Rawls' conception of the person divorces any constitutive attachments that persons might have to their ends. Hence, Sandel asserts that Rawls privileges the standpoint of self-interested individuals at the expense of communal interests. I do not find Sandel's specific

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    Constitutional Paideia

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    constitutionalism that construes a nation's constitution essentially in terms of ongoing processes of collective self-formation.(1) As such, it is markedly distinct from competing models. It is distinct from liberal models, notably represented today by John Rawls, for whom a constitution must "guarantee certain basic political rights and liberties and establish democratic procedures for moderating the political rivalry, and for determining issues of social policy."(2) While constitutional paideia is not chary

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