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    Williams Syndrome

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    Williams Syndrome, also known as Williams-Beuren Syndrome, is a genetic disorder caused by a deletion along chromosome seven. It is named for the two men who discovered and studied it in 1961, J.C.P. Williams of the United States and A.J. Beuren of Germany. Those with the disorder can be identified by their characteristic facial structure, the presence of cardiovascular anomalies and hypercalcemia, and a bright, outgoing personality. The exact number of those affected is unknown, however experts

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    and many other cancers. While on the other hand most disorders like Williams Syndrome are genetic and are primarily rare and only affect a limited amount of people about one in every several thousand. Because it is a genetic disorder that is estimated between 1 in 10,000 people worldwide, primarily caused by a micro-deletion on the seventh chromosome is what indicates the disorder being Williams Syndrome. Because Williams Syndrome is very uncommon within a large crowd among people, the causes that

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    Williams Syndrome and Brain Organization

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    Williams Syndrome and Brain Organization To understand the human brain, looking at behavior as an indicator of brain function has led researchers to focus on individuals with Williams syndrome (1). The limitations as well as highly developed features in behavior found in people with this syndrome have attracted investigators. The unique behavior displayed has led many to believe that it may be possible to unravel brain organization by locating the damaged areas in individuals with Williams syndrome

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    Williams-Beuren Syndrome

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    William’s Syndrome (WS) or Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is a condition that is genetic in origin, is present at birth, and affects males and females equally. Individuals with this syndrome have ongoing medical problems, which may include cardiovascular disease, developmental delays and learning disabilities. Individuals with WS are highly sociable, friendly, and endearing but cannot always understand social cues. William’s Syndrome is caused by a spontaneous deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome

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    pitch perception

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    (1998). Autism and pitch processing: a precursor for savant musical ability? Music Perception, 15, (3), 291-305. Lenhoff, H., M., Perales, O., Hickok, G. (2001). Absolute pitch in Williams syndrome. Music perception, 18, (4), 491-503. Levitin, D., J., Bellugi, U. (1998). Musical abilities in individuals with Williams Syndrome, Music Perception, 15, (4), 357-389. Pechstedt, P., H., Kershner, J., Kinsbourne, M. (1989). Musical Training improves processing of tonality in the left hemisphere. Music Perception

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    Hyperacusis

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    million people in the United States have hyperacusis. Further a survey conducted by the Autism Research Institute found up to 40% of children with autism to be affected by hyperacusis. Hyperacusis also has an occurence rate of 95% in children with Williams syndrome (Borse, Curfs, & Fryns, 1997). These facts plus its comorbidity with many other diseases leads one to believe hyperacusis is not an extremely rare disease. Hyperacusis is a poorly understood disorder resulting in many theories of etiology

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    Williams syndrome is a rare, relatively innocuous genetic disorder that gives its recipients a particular set of personality and physiological traits that can vary slightly depending on the case. Generally people with Williams syndrome exhibited extroverted benevolent personalities, prominent facial characteristics such as pronounced philtrums (the fold between your lips and nose), low nasal bridges, and pathologies such as certain heart diseases and optical defects, (amongst a plethora of behavioral

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    Battered Womens Syndrome

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    Battered Women's Syndrome: A Survey of Contemporary Theories Domestic Violence In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women's syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233, 23E (1993), which

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    Lesch Nyhan Syndrome

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    Lesch Nyhan Syndrome Lesch Nyhan Syndrome (LNS) was first reported in 1964 by Michael Lesch and William L. Nyhan. It is a rare disorder located on the x chromosome. It is a sex-linked trait, which means that it is passed from mother to son. This condition can be inherited or occur spontaneously as a result of a genetic mutation. It usually appears once in every 100,000 male births. Since the defective gene is recessive, females almost never exhibit symptoms of the disease. However, they can be carriers

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    Angelman Syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects the nervous system. Angelman Syndrome, also known as AS, affects behavioral, cognitive, and developmental functions of children, but most symptoms are not seen till later in the child’s life (Williams et al.). In 1965, Harry Angelman, a British physician, studied 3 children with similar conditions. He noted many parallel features in these children. The original term for Angelman Syndrome was “Happy Puppet”, but in 1982 the term Happy Puppet became

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