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    William Thomson

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    Born on June 26th 1824 in Belfast Ireland, William Thomson was one of many children. He was primarily raised by his father, James Thomson, as his mother died when he was six. James Thomson raised his family in a strict Presbyterian fashion. Although his father was strict and demanding, William mangaed to maitain a close relatioship with his father. James Thomson was the professor of engineering in Belfast and later was appointed to the chair of mathematics at the University of Glasgow. He taught

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    Lord Kelvin, or William Thomson

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    Lord Kelvin, or William Thomson, was destined for greatness at birth. He was born June 26, 1824 in Belfast, Ireland. His father was a prestigious mathematics professor at Glasgow University and his brother later became a professor of engineering (Webster 2). Both William Thomson and his older brother, James, were homeschooled by their father, also named James Thomson, in their early years. Their father encouraged them to discover and pursue all academic possibilities. While living on campus at Glasgow

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    Magnets

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    Diamagnetics was discovered by Michael Faraday in 1846, but no one at the time thought that it could lead to any appreciable effects. William Thomson (Lord Kelvin), referring to levitation as the problem of "Mohamet’s coffin," had this to say: "It will obably be impossible ever to observe this phenomenon, on account of the difficulty of getting a magnet strong enough, and a diamagnetic substance sufficiently light, as the [magnetic] forces are excessively feeble." Fields strong enough to lift diamagnetic

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    Anosmia

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    they go to the doctor almost immediately to fix the problem. However, because the sense of taste and smell are so closely related, many people attribute the problem to a lack of taste and do not see their doctor until the damage is irreversible (Thomson, 2001). Anosmia is a condition in which although there are mild cases, more serious cases do exist which may jeopardize the victim's life. This disorder not only affects the person's life and safety, but also has psychological effects as well . In

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    There is a basic contradiction involved in permitting abortion while at the same time prohibiting prenatal harm. (1) This contradiction can be stated in personhood terms and in terms of the woman's rights. I'd like to elucidate that contradiction and examine three solutions which rise out of current literature; I'd like then to propose a somewhat new, fourth solution. The Contradiction Stated in terms of personhood, the contradiction is this: abortion is permitted or condoned because the fetus

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    James Prescott Joule

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    that: "all matter is composed of atoms." Lord Kelvin James Joule worked with Lord Kelvin on experiments, which later became know as the Joule-Thomson Effect: Lord Kelvin was a well known Mathematical Physicist. The well known "Lord Kelvin" born as William Thomson, June 26 in 1824 and later died December 17 in 1907. William Thomson later became the 1st Baron Kelvin, he was known as "Lord Kelvin." Lord Kelvin is most recognized for his work in thermodynamics and Kelvin temperature

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    Lord Kelvin (1824 - 1907) William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin) was born June 26, 1824 in Belfast, Ireland, and was part of a large family whose mother died when he was six. His father taught Kelvin and his brothers mathematics to a level beyond that of university courses of the time. Kelvin was somewhat of a genius, and had his first papers published in 1840. These papers contained an argument defending the work of Fourier (Fourier transforms), which at the time was being heavily criticized by

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    Metropolis

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    wheels turning within wheels and the thudding of the pistons create an awe inspiring vision. Equally stunning is the workers conditions, as the slave in ominous underground factories " and live in apartment blocks all done in Expressionist style"(Thomson) Their homes, are stylized into mere forms with black rectangles for windows. A number of these were "models, which were combined with live actors through the Schufftan process"(Jensen). "The working class is portrayed powerfully -- slaves dressed

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    Abortion

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    the inappropriateness of a woman's body being her property. She continues her work by using Judith Thomson's paper, A Defense of Abortion as a tool to navigate her idea that abortion is morally permissible, even if a fetus has moral rights. Judith Thomson, according to Warren, says, "…a woman is under no moral obligation to complete an unwanted pregnancy" (Warren, 315). Warren uses one of Thomson's analogies to help state further rationalize her hypothesis. The analogy is this: What if you found yourself

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    Abortion

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    them In “A Defense of Abortion” Judith Thomson does a good job of poking holes in the extreme conservative argument, she is a moderate liberal. Even though she is defending abortion she states there are still times when it is impermissible. . Her first analogy she compares a growing fetus to a famous violinist who has unknowingly been attached to a person’s circulatory system. Is the person morally responsible to remained attached to the violinist? Thomson says no, because the person was kidnapped

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