Free William Jennings Bryan Essays and Papers

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    Written by Robert W. Cherny, A Righteous Cause discusses the life of William Jennings Bryan. It examines the many goals and proposals in which Bryan had became a public figure for. He wanted to reform the United States in a way that would “give equal rights to all and special privileges to none”. A few of his proposals included: government owned railroads, monetary policy, and a direct election of senators. Throughout Bryan’s career of activism he had a great impact on American history by conveying

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    however, would be tedious without varying viewpoints on essential vital matters. Hence, contemplating the mind of a passionate creationist defending an uncompromising claim instead of conforming to both sides is spellbinding. Thus what is, for William Jennings Bryan, the relationship of science and morality pertaining to his closing statement at the trial of John Scopes in 1925? Morality is endangered by science. To be more precisely, Christianity is endangered due to evolution theories, for evolution

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    “This one fact you must understand if you are to grasp the importance of the trial: the ignorance and bigotry against which Darrow and his associates struggled was too real, too armored in widespread public opinion to make the conflict waged in that Dayton court room anything less than high drama. Never, even in its most humorous moments and, fortunately, such moments were many, never was there an element of farce. The convictions involved were too deep-rooted, too passionately held.” – Marcet

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    The Election of 1896 and William McKinley

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    election of 1896 was between William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan. William McKinley was the republican candidate for president and William Jennings Bryan was the democratic candidate. Both candidates had different campaign styles and different supporters. Big businessmen supported McKinley and most common men supported Bryan. William McKinley’s campaign style was a front porch campaign while Bryan had a moving campaign. Mark Hanna played an important role as William McKinley’s campaign manager

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    Journalistic History

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    of the cartoon switched newspapers. The ensuing dispute gave rise to “yellow journalism” (unprincipled journalism) and led to the recruitment of countless newsboys in a bid to increase sales. The biggest yellow journalists were Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst (“Please remain. You furnish the pictures. I’ll furnish the war.”) 17. Bohemian Thinkers- Many of these “thinkers” lived in Greenwich Village, NYC. They supported Freudian psychoanalysis, rejected traditional sexual traditions, and

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    Dayton had no desire to travel forward with the roaring twenties.  William Jennings Bryan was the leading defender of the Butler Law as well as heading the prosecution. Bryan was determined to defend as literally true every word of the Bible.  In the deepest sense, he had to defend it; he needed reassurance and certainty, and since childhood had learned to rely on the Bible as the source of reassurance and certainty.  (Ginger 41).  Bryan would be the leader to a people who held on to religion and the

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    coinciding eras, as well as over compared generations. The individual philosophies of William Jennings Bryan, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, with regard to America’s roles in world affairs and foreign diplomacy; are both varied and conflicted. Despite those conflicts however, each leader has left his own legacy behind, in terms of how the U.S. continues to engage in world affairs today. William Jennings Bryan, despite being a thrice-failed presidential candidate, was a well respected Congressman

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    Imperialism in America

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    and the views of its people were changing. Many different ideas were surfacing about issues that affected the country as a whole. The Republican Party, led by William McKinley, were concentrating on the expansion of the United States and looking to excel in power and commerce. The Democratic Party at this time was led by William Jennings Bryan, who was absorbed in a sponge of morality and was concerned with the rights of man. The nation’s self-interest was divided into different ideas between the two

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    mysterious unknown figure in the shadows; a slithering serpent in the courtroom. The defense attorney for the Scopes Monkey Trial was a cunning man. Clarence Darrow had difficulty defending his client, John T. Scopes, against his opponent, William Jennings Bryan. To everyone’s surprise however, he proved that he could prevail, even if he was under pressure from the world around him. Though Scopes was found guilty under Darrow, he surprisingly only had to pay a fine of one hundred dollars. With such

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    Inherit The Wind

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    confrontation between fundamentalist literal belief of the bible and people who believed the bible was allegory or myth. The attorney for the defense was the famed trial lawyer Clarence Darrow and the prosecutor was the orator and statesman William Jennings Bryan. During the trial, no test of the constitutionality of the law was allowed by the trial judge, nor was any statement allowed that tested the validity of Darwin's theory. The trial was limited to questions on whether or not John T. Scopes

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    Scopes Trial

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    descended from a lower order of animals.” This act written by Rep. John Washington Butler, calling for a ban of the teaching of evolution, was written after Butler read a speech by ex-Secretary of State and leader in the anti-evolution movement William Jennings Bryan titled “Is the Bible true?”. A few months later a newspaper ran an article by the American Civil Liberties Union that said “The ACLU is looking for a Tennessee teacher who is willing to accept our services in testing this law in the courts

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    Scopes Monkey Trial

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    characters: three-time presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan; America's best defense attorney, Clarence Darrow: and its most popular journalist, H. L. Mencken. It was a trial about ideas, a contest between traditionalism, the faith of our fathers, and modernism, the idea that we test faith with our intellect. And it had what the New York Times called the most memorable event in Anglo-Saxon court history: Darrow's calling of William Jennings Bryan, the prosecutor, to the stand and examining

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    before, during, and after. The first section carefully exposes the political struggle over individual rights hidden in the debate between science and religion. What emerge are the political views of the two opposing parties: William Jennings Bryan and the ACLU. William Jennings Bryan’s adherence to fundamental Christianity and creationism was only one part of his politics. He also believed that the state had a duty to ... ... middle of paper ... ...e and technology with their religious beliefs

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    When bubble of happiness popped, Americans rushed to salvage what they could, but few succeeded. With the celebratory attitude of the Twenties in mind, Americans struggled to come to terms with the crisis of the Great Depression. The attitudes and shifting ideals of the Twenties led to many of the problems of the Great Depression, consequences of the hedonism and recklessness of the American public. No individual can solely take the blame for the carelessness of Americans, but many stood as role

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    Henry Darrow? The “Monkey Trial” in 1925 was one of the most famous clashes in history between the Bible and evolution. The concept of the play was based on the Scopes Trial, but characters, actions, and words were altered. During the trial, William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow went to court to try John Scopes for illegally teaching evolution, causing major complications in Dayton, Tennessee. In the play Inherit the Wind, the character, Henry Drummond, parallels his real-life counterpart, Clarence

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    “The Wizard of Oz” is a beloved, classical movie among children and adults alike. The story is about a young Kansas girl who dreams of being picked up from her uncle’s farm in a storm; in the dream, she is carried away to a land different from anything she has ever seen. Along the way she meets new friends who all wish to ask something of the Great Wizard of Oz for themselves. Once they reach the great Emerald City, however, they find the city to be a fraud; the very thing each had been searching

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    Scopes Trial

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    Scopes Trial For several days in July of 1925, a high school math teacher in Dayton, Tennessee became the most reported-on man in America. He was not an actor, an athlete, or a politician. He was on trial for teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution. The trial later came to be known as “Scopes Trial,” after John Scopes, the defendant. But this was not a trial to see what punishment he would receive. This trial pitted Protestant fundamentalists against the American Civil Liberties Union. In

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    This great Scottish man was born in his native on November 25, 1835. Mr. Carnegie was an iron/steel manufacture and a Philanthropist. Many people do not know that he was friends with some of the elite Americans such as Matthew Arnold, Mark Twain, William Gladstone and Theodore Roosevelt. In 1848, Carnegie’s family immigrated from his native to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from there he went from a regular boy to becoming a telegraph operator. There after he helped in the Civil War by helping to drastically

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    the two existing major political parties. Democrats had held the White House for the previous four years and were widely blamed for the severe economic depression of 1893. Before the democratic convention Bryan had traveled through the west, speaking passionately for the unlimited coinage

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    movement has been around since the Jacksonian era and since then we have seen populist politicians rise and fall from power. One of the most notable populists in American history is William Jennings Bryan, a young Democrat from Nebraska, ran for President in 1896 against William McKinley a Gilded Age Republican. Jennings campaigned to those who thought the American economy was corrupt and pushing them out of the system. Similarly, Donald Trump told a similar narrative. Trump preached the idea to make

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