Free Wilkie Collins Essays and Papers

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Free Wilkie Collins Essays and Papers

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    The Ostler by Wilkie Collins "The Ostler" a pre-20th century story by Wilkie Collins written in 1855. This short story is about the life of a man called Isaac Scatchard, who is a very unfortunate man. He goes for a job and being the unlucky man he is, gets there a day late. He stays at a frightening inn where he has a dream/premonition about a woman who tries to kill him. Later in the story he meets and marries this woman. The Opening four paragraphs are one episode in the story where

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    The Moonstone, by Wilkie Collins

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    truth occurs in the realms of the unconcious. We will explore the relevance of the contemporary psychology and its preoccupation in The Moonstone by examining the Victorian enthrallment of contemporary pyschology and the supernaturalism of Collins characters, observing the quivers of both themes throughout the novel. The mid nineteenth century sensational novel though criticised for its commonplace compromise is a reliable validation of the importunate effect of the investigation

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    Wilkie Collins' The Moonstone Near the beginning of Wilkie Collins’s novel, The Moonstone, John Herncastle’s cousin explains, “The deity commanded that the Moonstone should be watched, from that time forth, by three priests in turn, night and day, to the end of the generations of men… One age followed another—and still, generation after generation, the successors of the three Brahmins watched their priceless Moonstone, night and day” (2). As a result of remembering the past, and specifically

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    William Wilkie Collins

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    William Wilkie Collins William Wilkie Collins was born in London on January 8 1824, the son of the renowned painter William Collins (1788-1847). His father was a religious man, who was disappointed by his son's freethinking nature: Collins refused to conform to parental expectation, failing to make a career at the tea-merchants Antrobus and Co., to which he was apprenticed at the age of seventeen, and at the law, which he entered as a student in 1846. Collins was twenty-two when his father died

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    Wilkie Collins’ The Women in White begins in the perspective of Walter Hartright, a drawing master who has recently taken a job and is on his way. While traveling he helps a woman in white named Anne Catherick. Hartright thinks nothing of the encounter except that he found it odd the she was dressed in all white. But he later finds out that she has escaped from an asylum and is on the run. After finally arriving and prospering at his new job, Hartright takes a liking to Miss Laura Fairlie and befriends

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    Criricism of Wilkie Collins’ Woman in White “To Mr. Collins belongs the credit of having introduced into fiction those most mysterious of mysteries, the mysteries which are at our own doors.” So said Henry James in an unsigned review of another author’s work. But his view was certainly not shared by all those who cast their opinions into the fray. An unsigned review in the Saturday Review said of Collins’ work, “Estimated by the standard of great novels, the Woman in White is nowhere. Somewhere

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    Wilkie Collins’ The Woman In White: 19th Century Victorian femininity exposed through the accounts of multiple narrators Readers of nineteenth century British literature imagine typical Victorian women to be flighty, emotionally charged, and fully dependent on the men in their lives. One envisions a corseted woman who is a dutiful wife, pleasant entertainer, and always the model of etiquette. Wilkie Collins acknowledges this stereotype in his novel The Woman in White, but he contradicts this

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    The Woman In White, by Wilkie Collins, is a successful gothic novel of the 19th century. It is a 3-volume novel; each volume (epoch) finishing with the reader eagerly waiting to read the next one, therefore there are many unanswered questions, in or... The Woman In White, by Wilkie Collins, is a successful gothic novel of the 19th century. It is a 3-volume novel; each ‘volume’ (epoch) finishing with the reader eagerly waiting to read the next one, therefore there are many unanswered questions

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    The Moonstone

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    Alexandra Lloyd What role did 19th Century popular serial novels such as Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone play in British understandings of India? When Wilkie Collins first wrote The Moonstone in 1868, it was not published in the form available today, but was published in instalments in a popular Victorian magazine, All the Year Round. Upon its first publication it was eagerly read by the general British public, for its readership not only included the ruling and upper classes, but the cost and availability

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    ed. p.87) This hypothesis adequately compliments Wilkie Collins’ characterisation of the eponymous jewel in The Moonstone and the moral pattern the author forms around its adventures. In the Nineteenth Century the jewel was the ultimate exotic object, Collins describes the Moonstone as “a yellow diamond- a famous gem in the native annals of India,” (Collins p.33) and clearly credits influence to the Koh-i-Noor in his preface to the novel. Collins builds upon the alien nature of such an object utilising

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