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    Oil Drilling in the Alaskan Wildlife Refuges

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    Alaskan Wildlife Refuges America Should Reject the Oil Businesses Plan and Permanently Protect The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, comprising more than nineteen million acres in the northern corner of Alaska, is unique and one of the largest units of the National Wildlife system. The Arctic Refuge has long been recognized as an unparalleled place of natural beauty and ecological importance. The Arctic Refuge was established to conserve fish and wildlife populations

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    Wildlife Refuges

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    Are refuges in Trouble? There are 542 refuges in the U.S. comprising 95 million acres of protected land. Individual refuges serve as a multitude of purposes, including protecting endangered plants and animals and their habitats, preserving wilderness areas, providing outdoor recreational and educational opportunities, and providing lands and waters for traditional uses such as hunting and fishing. One would think that from the overall ownership of land and wonderful activities that the refuges provide

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    dependence upon petroleum-based energy sources has required the United States to consider a variety of options to fulfill [the] ever-increasing energy needs, even drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge [ANWR] (Smith). The controversial question on whether or not to drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge reserve has been in battle since its establishment. Drilling in ANWR would cause severe damage as it is a danger to its native plants and animals as the land is their home and birthing ground

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    Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge Everyday we put tons of pollution into the air, water and ground. Our population is growing each day and in turn urbanization is expanding. Teddy Roosevelt, being an avid outdoorsmen, knew the importance of setting land aside for posterity sake and in doing do set a trend for later presidents. When Richard Nixon set land aside in Alaska, which became the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), he set it aside to be never tainted by industrialization. Today

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    environmental damage, drilling in ANWR should not be conducted. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a 19,300,000 acre refuge in northeast Alaska; it is the largest wilderness area in the United States and is managed by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service. The refuge was created under the Public Land Order 2214 in 1960, and was expanded in 1980 through the Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). This Act is the source of great controversy because it included the

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    Chincoteague is tucked behind the much larger island of Assateague. Assateague Island houses Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) and Assateague National Seashore. Tourist must drive through Wallops Island mainland and Chincoteague Island to get to the beaches of Assateague. Chincoteague provides attractions, hotels, shopping and food for those tourists. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge is the only car accessible public beach on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. It is a major tourist destination

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    Oil Drilling in the Artic National Wildlife Refuge The main issue presented in my research involves the debate between environmentalists and the United States government on whether to open and develop a portion of the Artic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in the northern coastal plain of Alaska for the purpose of drilling for oil. Environmentalists argue that opening up this region of ANWR to future oil drilling would destroy the current ecosystems, disrupt animal habitats and adversely change

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    Opening up the Alaskan Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Many preconceived notions exist in the realm of environmental policy. Decisions are constantly made that effect human health or environmental integrity in order to reap great economic benefits for the many. Often these choices compromise the role of human beings as environmental stewards of the planet. It is my attempt in this paper to outline the development of a very controversial part of the proposed comprehensive energy policy: the

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    Twitchell researched the Northern Slope of the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and found out that there is a large amount of untapped crude oil. Twitchell states (2001) that the government and environmentalists have fought over drilling rights in this area and the government wants money but the environmentalists do not want to abolish the habitat. After researching this topic, Twitchell realized that he was not going to be able to pick one side of the argument. He says that both parties made

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    destroy the Alaskan preserves, just because Alaska is wealthy in oil. However, Alaska is wealthy in more than just oil. It is wealthy in beauty, wildlife, and culture. Americans and native Alaskans must endorse and implement an environmental law to support wildlife population. Or else overwhelming effects will follow. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, more commonly known as the ANWR , and other barren lands in Alaska, has a history of combating oil production. In 1923, twenty-three million acres

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