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    Childhood Obesity Campaign

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    series of public relations campaigns to enhance the fight against children obesity such as free exercise courses for children (City and Country of Swansea, 2010). However, the rate of obesity has continue to increase in the last ten years (Welsh Assembly Government, 2013a). Gregory (2000:44) listed ten stages of planning: analysis, objective, publics, messages, strategies, tactics, timescales, resources, evaluation and review. Based on the market research result, a three month healthy eating campaign

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    Comparing the Scottish Parliament and Welsh Assembly On the 1st of July 1999 the Scottish Parliament assumed its full powers and duties. This was a devolved government, where some legislative powers were transferred from Westminster to the Parliament in Scotland. The Scottish parliament was designed to embody the links between the people of Scotland, the members of the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Executive. The powers of duty are divided between the Scottish Executive (handles ministerial

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    1. Introduction: Since the national waste strategy for Wales was launched in 2002, Welsh recycling has been dramatically improved (Welsh Assembly Government, 2010a). In 2010, Welsh government revised its overarching waste strategy to “Toward Zero Waste”. Based on this strategy, Wales will achieve a high recycling in 2025 and zero waste by 2050 (Welsh Assembly Government, 2014a). In the past three years, the tonnes of waste recycled and composted have significantly raised (Statswales, 2014a). Meanwhile

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    Wales Essay

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    Britain. Although united politically, administratively, and economically with England since the Act of Union of 1536, Wales has preserved, maintained, and developed a somewhat independent cultural identity. It is the interplay between English and Welsh elements that characterizes life in Wales (Gruffudd, Carter, Smith,

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    led to the Devolution Act. In 1999 and 2003 the conservatives received 18 seats through the List vote under AMS, giving them a much fairer representation of their support nationally in Scotland. The AMS in the welsh assembly has enabled more choice and consequently 50% of the welsh assembly’s members are female, the first democratically elected legislature to be able to say that. These results in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales have reduced the probability of a single party gaining complete

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    A Welsh Identity

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    “For Wales, see England” - this oft-quoted entry in the index to the original edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica elegantly sums up the centuries of suppression of the Welsh identity by the English parliament. Llywr James, a worker at the National History Museum of Wales, told me with passion in his voice how he dreams of the day when the Embassy of Wales will be opened in Washington D.C. “And it will happen during my lifetime,” he emphatically added. “Independence is simply not in the interests

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    Snowdonia National Park

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    priority, and the decisions made in this period reflect those times. Young people back from the armed services became disillusioned and moved away. This was a great time of expansion in the motor industries in the midlands. The 1974 local government reorganisation presented and opportunity for change and the national park became a department of Gwynedd County Council. This period was one of building on the work that had been done in previous years. Many sites were brought and made into

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    Nationalism in Britain

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    conquest, and then with France until the 15th century. From the 16th century n English national consciousness developed. Wales was politically subject to the English crown from the 13th century, being formally united with England in 1536; the Welsh had little say in the process of absorption under English rule. Ireland was more erratically controlled by the English monarchy from the 12th century, but unlike Britain remained obstinately Catholic, apart from Ulster which was forcibly settled

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    rights. A country that has made steps to preserve its national language is Wales, through government legislations and incorporating the language into all public sectors successfully. As to be discussed there is extensive research that exists explaining why it is important to be able have the freedom to use a language of choice and how much it can affect people. Social workers work alongside the council and government to try and ensure the best results for the people of Wales. Both social workers and their

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    document but in a complex mixture of institutional practices; that is, of history, custom, tradition, and politics reflected in conventions, procedures, and protocols as well as within the body of statute and common law. Because on many matters British government depends less on legal rules and safeguards than upon political and democratic principles, the UK constitution is well-known to have a political constitution. A political constitution is defined as one where those wielding power are held accountable

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    Contemporary Language Situation in Wales

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    Wales. Welsh had declined to a minority language status in Wales at the beginning of the 20th century but recent efforts carried out by the Welsh Government saw the language experience signs of revitalisation. I will consider the level of success of a possible revitalisation and the ways in which the country attempts to encourage it. I will refer to statistical data to support my arguments and apply the works of language theorists such as Joshua Fishman and David Crystal. I will explore the Welsh language

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    Subsequently the return of the Labour government in June 2001 heralds a second wave of changes to the British constitution. I believe that the onset of this century will introduce a new phase for the British constitution as 'the momentum continues' (Hazell et al., 2000, 260). This is why I have chosen to investigate such a topic, as it is so relevant on the contemporary stage. A constitution is a body of fundamental laws of a state, which lays down the system of government and serves to define the relations

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    contract law

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    in legislation was deemed to include Wales. This ceased with the enactment of the Welsh Language Act 1967 and the jurisdiction is now commonly referred to as "England and Wales". Although devolution has accorded some degree of political autonomy to Wales in the National Assembly for Wales, it did not have the ability to pass primary legislation until the Government of Wales Act 2006 came into force after the 2007 Welsh general election. The legal system administered through both civil and criminal

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    fully understood before it can be explored in sufficient depth. A written constitution would outline the structures and powers of government in broad terms and the relationship between the different parts of government and citizens. Gradual reform, on the other hand, has no written record of the powers of government or a clear relationship between government and citizens; however, these are determined by laws that evolve with the current views and morals of Britain. A modern democracy can

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    The Structure Of The NHS

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    was developed, there was no prediction of how much all the services would cost to run. The government introduced the first service charges for dentures in 1951and prescription and spectacle’s in 1952 this could have been due to everyone needing medical care at the same time. This also suggests that individuals health improved, likely to live longer and would need more services in the future which the government realised would be unrealistic to achieve. Even then, as it is currently, it remains difficult

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    Vavasor Powell

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    Vavasor Powell (1617-1670) Puritan preacher, author, and soldier, was born at Knucklas (Welsh Cnwclas, ‘Green Hill’) Radnorshire, modern Powys. His father was Richard Powell, his mother was Penelope, daughter of William Vavasor of Newtown, Morrice has her originally coming from Yorkshire, before settling in Wales. He was an ardent evangelist and preached in many places around Wales. He once denounced Cromwell by saying “Lord, wilt thou have Oliver Cromwell or Jesus Christ to reign over us?” Not

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    the Conservatives have been in Government. This has been the occurrence since 1945, and to amend this and be represented wholly, we should reform our electorate system using a method of Proportional Representation in which the electorate would be represented. The current system does have some advantages, such as it is a simple system and the concept can be grasped by anyone, and it produces clear results. Therefore, there would be a strong majority government and no weak coalitions. The author

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    Confidentiality

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    the care and patient relationship and result in patients being reluctant to share information important to their proper care. In relation to the national guidelines, and those relevant to the location of the placement being considered, the Welsh Assembly Government (WAG, 2005) highlight that when dealing with confidential information, it should be done lawfully and ethically and conforming to profession related codes of practice. The WAG (2005) point out that legal considerations are necessary when

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    which means authority of American government shared between Washington and the other states. Which operates according to the principles of federalism and separated institutions therefore there is a tri-partite division of power between executive, legislature, judiciary sharing power; both disperse and fragment government power. This therefore provides a decentralised political system and auntonomy is given to the state governent by the national government. As each state has its legislative

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    The Need For Constitutional Reform No government in modern times has ever been elected with such a commitment to reforming the constitution as the Labour administration that won office in May 1997. Within months of its election, Scotland and Wales were on the road to devolution. Within a year, although in a very different context, the framework had been set for a devolved, power sharing government in Northern Ireland. A year after that the process was well under way for reform of the House

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