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    Themes of Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt vonnegut and Catch 22 by Joseph Heller In the books, Slaughter House 5 by Kurt Vonnegut and Catch 22 by Joseph Heller there are many themes that at first don’t appear to be related but once given a closer look have striking similarities. Both books are about one mans experience through World War II, one being a fighter pilot and another being a soldier. Each man is known as an anti-war hero. They do not agree with the war and do not find it appropriate to

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    How Kurt Vonneguts Life Efected his Work

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    How Kurt Vonneguts Life Efected his Work Kurt Vonnegut Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. was born in Indianapolis in 1922. His father was an architect, his mother a noted beauty. Both spoke German, but wouldn’t teach Kurt the language because of all the anti-German sentiment following the first World War. While in high school, Vonnegut edited the school's daily newspaper. He attended Cornell for a little over two years and wrote for the Cornell Daily Sun. In 1942, he was drafted into the U.S. Army. In

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    In the short story, “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut Jr, the futuristic setting of 2081, demonstrates the negative impacts of excessive equality and the detrimental effects that it can have on society. The governing body in the story is provided too much power, forcing individuals to be tamed for their individuality. The laws enforce weights to be worn upon the strong and athletic, the intelligent to stick radios on or in their ears, broadcasting government messages to disrupt their concentration

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    States, equality is demanded for everyone. At first glace, complete equality sounds optimal, but upon closer inspection, it can have detrimental effects. This prompts the question, when does equality become problematic rather than idealistic? Kurt Vonnegut Jr.’s “Harrison Bergeron” is the perfect example of a society that has taken equality too far, turning something that was once ideal into something dystopic. In “Harrison Bergeron,” individuality is essentially eradicated through the enforcement

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    In his science fiction novel The Sirens of Titan, Kurt Vonnegut attempts to answer the meaning of life and ultimately comes with the answer that in order "to realize that a purpose of human life, no matter who is controlling it, is to love whoever is around to be loved." (220). However, giving such a straightforward and blunt answer obviously hints that Vonnegut's sarcasm to such a simple solution. Throughout the novel, Vonnegut ridicules religion and science simultaneously in order to come to the

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    upon others. This idea destroys our differing perceptions of what it means to shape a “fair” community. Equality and fairness often coincide, and with that, their respective definitions are commonly misinterpreted. In “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut Junior, it is essential for the reader to acknowledge that one 's perspective of an ideal society reflects their measure of self-worth, because it affects the way we interpret events in our daily lives, resulting in insecurities, restricted freedoms

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    In Slaughterhouse-Five, the author, Kurt Vonnegut, did an excellent job to narrate the life story of Billy Pilgrim, a man who could travel between his past and future back and forth. And as readers went through the novel, there were two major themes that would stick in their mind, which were the condemnation of war, and the attitude towards life. The central event of the book, the bombing of Dresden, has caught the readers’ attention to the power of a war. The unnecessary war attack brought 135,000

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    Kurt Vonnegut - The Only Story of Mine Whose Moral I Know "This is the only story of mine whose moral I know. I don't think it's a marvelous moral; I simply happen to know what it is : We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be." "Look out, Kid!" -Bob Dylan, Subterranean Homesick Blues Vonnegut's work is rife with instances of lie become truth. Howard Campbell's own double identity is a particularly strong example, although Vonnegut's

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    The story “Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut is120 years in the future, which allows us to more easily accept some of the bizarre events that happen in the story such as when the character Harrison Bergeron is dancing with a ballerina and there is no law of gravity and motion, so they can almost touch the studio ceiling which is thirty feet high. The author emphasizes in his work themes such as freedom, mind manipulation, the American dream, and media influence, also the opposition between strength

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    happens when you return from war. Kurt Vonnegut in Slaughterhouse-Five touches on how it is to deal with this mental illness before it was diagnosed as post-traumatic stress disorder. The author uses science fiction’s raw intensity to alter Billy Pilgrim’s imagination after he returns from the war. As he is a victim of this undiagnosed mental illness, he uses science fiction’s effect on him as a coping mechanism. Through the experiences of Billy Pilgrim, Kurt Vonnegut explores the powerful impact science

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