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    Vaudeville Theaters

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    Vaudeville was a premier source of entertainment for many Americans in the late 19th and early 20th century. Vaudeville theaters around the United States consisted of a variety of acts from singers and comedians to animal trainers and human marvels. In this paper I will take a look at some of the most intriguing acts I could find. Such acts include celebrities, humans performing incredible feats like surviving being shot by a cannon multiple times or spewing flames, and the so called missing link

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    perform in theaters, while illustrating the creativity of people with an eagerness to entertain. The The development of vaudeville theater had a significant impact on America by providing people of all ages with a new source of entertainment, a new type of music/ theater experience, and symbolized the cultural diversity of early 20th century America. There really was no need for vaudeville theater, but it was still beneficial to Americans in multiple ways. For the performers, also known as vaudevillians

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    musical theatre developed into how we know it today. Vaudeville and burlesque were forms of theatre in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s that forged the way for the American musical to emerge. The elements that writers used from vaudeville allowed for not just musical acts to be performed during the course of the story, but eventually became a way for the story to further be told. The American musical was not always as big as it is today, and vaudeville and burlesque acts made it possible for such a type

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    Vaudeville, Act Two: Nickelodeons With the entertainment business already booming with traveling circuses, wild west shows, burlesque, and vaudeville, just to name a few, it seemed like Americans already had an abundant amount to choose from. However, going into the 20th century, with the invention of early motion picture cameras, such as Thomas Edison's kinetograph, it seemed like only the beginning for the entertainment industry; new means of entertainment were bound to be founded. Americans wanted

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    emerging vaudeville theatrical shows. Vaudeville was gaining much popularity because it strived to appeal to people of all socioeconomic classes and cultural background as well as offered low admission prices. It consisted of a diversity of individual performances which could range from comical skits, singing, acrobatic stunts to magic shows. “Variety theatre drew larger audiences than the ‘legitimate’ theater which presented classical performances” (Administrator). For this reason, vaudeville theatre

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    History Of Shuffle Along

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    gave African American’s the opportunity to better represent themselves for themselves. Shuffle Along was the creation of Eubie Blake, Noble Sissle, Flourney E. Miller and Aubrey Lyles. The two groups met while traveling with their own respective vaudeville acts and decided to try together to bring the Negro back to Broadway, which had not been successful up to this point. Miller and Lyles had the idea that the only form of black theatre that would be successful on Broadway was a musical comedy.

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    twenties. The lifestyle in Chicago featured jazz, booze, sex and crime. More importantly, Chicago had beautiful, young women with the dream of having their own Vaudeville act. The two main female characters, Velma and Roxy were two such women hoping to capture the public's attention. The composition of the show is a metaphoric integration of Vaudeville type acts amongst the book scenes and diegetic musical numbers. Chicago is an example of a concept musical. It would not be realistic to simply accept

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    Comedy of Errors - Romance What is so interesting about Shakespeare's first play, The Comedy of Errors, are the elements it shares with his last plays. The romances of his final period (Pericles, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest) all borrowed from the romantic tradition, particularly the Plautine romances. So here, as in the later plays, we have reunions of lost children and parents, husbands and wives; we have adventures and wanderings, and the danger of death (which in this play is not

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    Essay On Musical Theatre

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    How did musical theater develop from reviews, opera to what it is today? Musical theatre originated from something called an Operetta. An Operetta is a genre of light opera, light in terms both of music and subject matter. It is also closely related, in English-language works, to forms of musical theatre. An Opera is a performance which started in the 1590s in Italy. This form of musical theatre includes spoken word too, such as some scenery, acting, costumes and dance. Opera is most commonly performed

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    came along with it. One of the most popular forms of entertainment during the Gilded Age was theater, particularly Vaudeville, which was a type of variety theater prominent in late 19th century America. Of course, similar types of variety shows had existed much earlier, before the 1830's, but they experienced a growth thanks to Benjamin Franklin Keith, "the father" of American Vaudeville. He spent his earlier years working in traveling shows and circuses, before establishing his own museum of oddities

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    Vaudeville was very popular from the late 1800s to the early 1900s in North America. Vaudeville shows were made up of many random acts that were placed together in a common play bill. Some acts were, for example, plays, clowns, jugglers, comedians, etc. Once the radio was introduced, vaudeville’s started to become less popular as the radio’s popularity started to increase. The radio started out with maximum five programs but as the demand for radios increased so did the amount of programs, which

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    The music industry’s history is a convoluted mess. There is no real consensus on what the music industry IS and what paths it has taken. Were the Beatles the greatest band to ever exist? Maybe. Is there a hyper objectification of women throughout the “men’s club” that is the music industry? Probably. It’s this hard to define, frankly confusing business that is worth roughly $130 billion dollars today. With it’s flimsy and opaque edges, can the music industry ever be called into question on its wrongdoings

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    Walter Winchell was born in 1897, he grew up from a poor Jewish family. Winchell first started out as a child entertainer but later moved up the ranks and worked in Vaudeville. Winchell was a mediocre review but he excelled as a chronicler. Winchell had the ability to create neologisms that no one had ever thought of especially in Broadway. Winchell came up with the term the Big Apple, which is still popularly used even

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    A Closer Look at the Musical, Chicago

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    reporter Maurine Dallas Watkins about actual criminals and crimes she reported on. The story is a satire on corruption in the administration of criminal justice and the concept of the "celebrity criminal." Fred Ebb explains: “So I made it [Chicago] a vaudeville based on the idea that the characters were performers. Every musical moment in the show was loosely modeled on someone else: Roxie was Helen Morgan, Velma was Texas Guinan, Billy Flynn was Ted Lewis, Mama Morton was Sophie Tucker,” (Kander, Ebb

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    Orpheum Paper

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    and stabilize the economy and allow for a huge influx of immigrants into the 1920s (The History of Sioux City). In response to the economic recovery nationally, there was a great “Orpheum boom” across the country as places to perform the popular vaudeville acts and new “moving picture” shows (Poole). Rapp & Rapp out of Chicago were the leaders in designing Orpheum Theaters across the nation, designing theaters such as the Oriental Theater in Chicago, IL, the Paramount Theater in New York City, and

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    Philip Covarrubias Covarrubias 1 Fire 101-10 Friday 0900-1150 12-06-2013 Iroquois Theater Fire The Iroquois Theatre (Theater) Fire occurred on December 30, 1903, in Chicago, Illinois. It is the deadliest theater fire and the deadliest single-building fire in United States history. A total of 602 people died as a result of the fire. The theatre had three audience levels. The main floor (known as the

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    A.Early 1.Burlesque used parodies of songs that were already in existence. 2.The music was used to indicate a bright or high-spirited humor, sometimes in contrast to seriousness. 3.These songs were written to popular music worldwide. 4.Later burlesques mixed the music of opera, operetta, music hall and revue. 5.Some of the more demanding shows had original music composed for them. 6.Very much of Burlesque was acting and theatrical roles with dialogue. B.Today 1.Burlesque uses live music

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    The Vaudeville Star

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    The Vaudeville Star Vaudeville was a cheap form of escape for the struggling families going through the Great Depression. Vaudeville was a variety of acts from comedians to singers to dancing families and one would hardly see the same show twice. The Great Depression was a struggle to the people in the audience, and to the performers who had to work just as hard as any of the workers in the streets. Sophie Tucker overcame the struggle of the vaudeville lifestyle by moving away from her family

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    Because this is my final curtain call, I thought it would be fun to reminisce on my last four years in this department. Vaudeville 2014 Academy Presents I auditioned with one act, animals if you remember that masterpiece, and if you can imagine, I was actually pretty shy. I had always known I wanted to be in theater, but I didn’t know that joining Gibson Southern theater came with a huge supportive family. I quickly grew out of my shell and felt at home here. After academy presents was Mary Poppins

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    in Vaudeville, something nowadays akin to a talent show of sorts. People started to seek more diversified amusement, finding it in the touring traveling companies that Vaudeville was known for. Vaudeville stood for more than solely entertainment, it embodied and reflected the rapidly changing tides of the American culture, providing an up close and personal look at the progressing melting pot composed of a myriad of divergent ethnic and racial backgrounds. With the advancement of Vaudeville also

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