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    Between 1815-1840 Upper Canada was under the influence of a few elite individuals known as the ‘Family Compact’. These individuals held sway through their control of large amounts of land and their dominance of the governments various branches. With their hold on the government of Upper Canada, the family compact aimed to create a government that regulated all aspects of society. However the people of Canada disliked the family compacts dominance of Upper Canada’s political system and when attempts

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    The Case of the Black Donnellys

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    Donnellys” is indicative of social and community relations during the nineteenth century in Upper Canada. Characterized by frontier agriculture, a growing but weak authority structure, and an influx of emigration, mob justice complemented the legal system nefariously. The arson of the Donnelly's home, as well as James Senior's imprisonment demonstrate the role of these two powers in society. I will argue that Upper Canada during the mid to late nineteenth century reacted to increased crime with both community

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    Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace

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    Susanna Moodie, a 19th-century emigrant to Canada. In a disparaging memoir entitled Roughing it in the Bush , published in London and addressed to an English audience, Moodie concentrated on the ‘otherness’ and ‘foreigness’ of Canada to refined European sensibilities, thus emphasising the privilege of ‘home’ over ‘native’ and ‘metropolitan’ over ‘provincial’. (Litvack 120). Life in the Clearings, Moodie’s sequel, intended to show the ‘more civilised’ side of Canada west, contained an account of her visit

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    keep open for tourists. The significant history connected with the building should be told. The background of Mackenzie House is linked to a person named William Lyon Mackenzie. He was born in 1795, in Scotland and when he was 25 years old he came to Canada with his mother, son, and Fiancee. Mackenzie had a talent for politics. As a result, he became the most famous and reputable newspaper editor and writer. He started running his own newspaper, which he named The Colonial Advocate, in 1824. The newspaper

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    not know why I decided to leave Ashburton, England and go all the way to British North America with my sister’s family. Maybe it was because I wanted a fresh start. Also, it’s an experience to be able to live in the new world. Once we landed in Upper Canada and saw a glimpse of my new home-- my new farm, I knew it was too late to turn back now. The government assigned us a lot at the northernmost part of the land. Since my brother-in-law is severely injured, it was up to my sister, her seven year

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    country the realization a new nation and broke the control they had over. Although it is clear that American Revolution created the nation of American, it can argued that it also created the nation up north; Canada. The Revolutionary War not only resulted in the nation of America but the nation of Canada as well. The American Revolution and Nova Scotia Reconsidered by George A. Rawlyk discuss the impact the American Revolution had on Nova Scotia. Due to the Seven Years’ War, there were many settlements

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    to become the first Bishop of Toronto. John Strachan had a highly Loyalist view towards the governing of Upper Canada; he was especially faithful to the betterment of the Church of England. Strachan was in favour of a purely British Upper Canada or at least one run according to British standards. Although Strachan believed that the best way was the British way, many individuals in Upper Canada disagreed. Strachan's attempts to monopolize all opportunities in favour of the British caused public uproar

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    The 43 acres in Toronto’s downtown west end that make up the Fort York National Historic site is of huge civic significance in Toronto’s founding landscape. Built in 1793, the site remains Canada’s largest collection of original War of 1812 buildings. But despite it being considered the birthplace of urban Toronto, it isn’t the easiest place to get to. “It is glaringly obvious how difficult it is to find Fort York and it has been like this for years,” explained David O’Hara, Museum Administrator

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    The Canadian Shield

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    In the period between 1760 and confederation, settlement in Lower and Upper Canada pushed into the Canadian Shield. In Lower Canada, settlement in the Shield was mostly by the Saguenay River, St. Maurice Valley and the area north of Montreal. In Upper Canada, settlement was attempted in the Ottawa-Huron Tract which was eastward from Lake Huron into the Ottawa Valley. Canadian colonial settlement shared a fluctuating relationship with the Canadian Shield. The Shield was a barrier to settlement

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    Robertson Davies

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    the city of Kingston, where his father owned the local newspaper, the Whig-Standard. From 1928 to 1932, Robertson Davies attended Toronto’s Upper Canada College – the "Colborne College" of his novels Fifth Business, The Manticore, and What’s Bred in the Bone. Truly, these Ontarian towns shaped the geographical heart of Davies’ fictional works. At the Upper Canada College, young Davies was immersed in school dramatics and was the editor of the school paper. Admitted to Queen’s University in Kingston

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