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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality What secrets of dramatic genius underpin the universal acceptance of Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet so long after its composition? Harold Bloom in the Introduction to Modern Critical Interpretations: Hamlet explains one very solid basis for the universal appeal of this drama -- the popular innovation in characterization made by the Bard: Before Shakespeare, representations in literature may change as they speak, but they do not change because of what they

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    Universality and the Particular

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    Universality and the Particular “History,” Gilman writes, “is, or should be, the story of our racial life” (Gilman 216). Eliot is a bit less succinct, but perhaps he could be most pithily summed up as saying: “The business of the poet is not to find new emotions, but to use the ordinary ones and, in working them up into poetry, to express feelings which are not in actual emotions at all” (Eliot 1919, 23). It is not immediately evident what either author means by these statements, however, they

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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality Shakespeare’s tragic play Hamlet is an excellent example, perhaps the best in English literature, of a work that has universal appeal. This essay will analyze the incredible universality of this drama, with the input of literary critics. Robert B. Heilman in “The Role We Give Shakespeare” relates the universality of Shakespeare to the “innumerableness of the parts”: But the Shakespeare completeness appears graspable and possessable to many men at odds

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    Pluralism and the Universality of Rights

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    Pluralism and the Universality of Rights ABSTRACT: The problem of the coexistence of cultures arises inside modern societies that have a constitutional set-up expressed by 'pluralism.' Their central problem lies in the relationship between individuality and sociality, freedom and order. The function of law is to transform absolute pluralism into a relative pluralism limited by fundamental common interests, thus overcoming the problems that arise from the variety of different views of the world

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    Othello’s Universality of Appeal

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    Othello’s Universality of Appeal The Shakespearean play Othello has enjoyed popularity on the stage and in print for 400 years. What are the features which enhance this quality among readers? And what detracts? Does the playwright’s use of “double time” contribute to its universality of appeal? In The Riverside Shakespeare Frank Kermode explains the advantages of “double time” to Shakespeare: “Double time” is a classical topic of Othello criticism; one of its uses is to remind

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    Uniqueness and Universality in Tess of the D'Ubervilles She can flirt, she can listen, she can sympathize, she can work with her hands.    (Hardy  131) The above line from Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles demonstrates a great deal about the themes of the novel as well as the character of Tess.  The line reprinted above is supposed to reveal the versatility of Tess' character.  However, it also reveals a good deal that helps us understand Hardy's central theme of the book.  This is because

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    Universality of Romeo and Juliet There seems to be an on-going debate as to whether we should attempt to "modernize" Shakespeare (or any of the other classics for that matter).  I think that you can look at it two ways.  Both appeal to the universality of the work.  Either: 1. It is universal and modernizing it only emphasizes that fact, or 2. It is universal and  modernizing it is not necessary.  I think you can play it both ways, and I think Romeo and Juliet  is a good example

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    Othello: its Universality Pro and Con

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    Othello: its Universality Pro and Con In the Shakespearean play Othello there are elements which the audiences of 400 years ago found appealing, and which the audiences of today find appealing. This is the secret of the universality of the drama – a quality which some critics question. H. S. Wilson in his book of literary criticism, On the Design of Shakespearean Tragedy, discusses the lack of universality in the protagonist of the play: Still, the play is Othello’s story: he is

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    Utility and Universality versus Utility and the General Good ABSTRACT: The concepts of Utility and Universality form an answer to the utilitarian topology of Utility and the General Good. Starting from the realization that utility cannot be determined materially, but only formally, the very premise of utilitarian philosophy has to be abandoned. The greatest good is not the good of the greatest number, but the universal good. The concepts Utility and Universality form an answer to the utilitarian

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    Critique of Kohlberg’s Claim of Cultural Moral Universality Introduction As the American Heritage Dictionary plainly states, morality is "a system of ideas of right and wrong conduct" (American Heritage Dictionary 2000). People have been researching the development of this sense of morality for centuries. There is great debate over how a person’s morality is formed and then how to categorize one person’s level of morality compared to others. Most researchers believe that people reach different

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