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    Othello – the Universal Appeal

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    Othello – the Universal Appeal For 400 years the audience has found William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello to be relevant to their lives and tastes. Why? What enduring qualities does the play possess in order to ensure its continuing success? Does the reason lie in the great heterogeneity of characters and scenes and actions within the play?  Robert B. Heilman in “The Role We Give Shakespeare” relates the universality of Shakespeare to the “innumerableness of the parts”: But the

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    William Shakespeare's Universal Appeal "Shakespeare's plays have universal appeal" Shakespeare's plays deal with aspects of the human condition this is what makes his plays have Universal appeal. The human condition contains issues and emotions that appear in everyday life, for example love and power are both elements of the human condition. As Shakespeare's plays deal with this they not only have a timeless quality, as emotions do not change over centuries even though other issues might

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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality What secrets of dramatic genius underpin the universal acceptance of Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet so long after its composition? Harold Bloom in the Introduction to Modern Critical Interpretations: Hamlet explains one very solid basis for the universal appeal of this drama -- the popular innovation in characterization made by the Bard: Before Shakespeare, representations in literature may change as they speak, but they do not change because of what they

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    I strongly disagree with Isabel Paterson’s opinion. I do not think The Great Gatsby lacks universal appeal at all. Many of the issues touched upon in the story can be directly connected or related to events that are still happening in today’s society. To say that this book is only good for one time period is not realistic due to all the proof against it. The importance of wealth is demonstrated in the book by showing Gatsby’s popularity due to his wealth, which allows him to throw extravagant parties

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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality Shakespeare’s tragic play Hamlet is an excellent example, perhaps the best in English literature, of a work that has universal appeal. This essay will analyze the incredible universality of this drama, with the input of literary critics. Robert B. Heilman in “The Role We Give Shakespeare” relates the universality of Shakespeare to the “innumerableness of the parts”: But the Shakespeare completeness appears graspable and possessable to many men at odds

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    Best Evidence

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    effectively incorporates timeless components. The epic poem relates the tale of Beowulf, a warrior who throughout his life overcomes evils. It has strong elements of Anglo-Saxon elements of bravery, strength and of religious tenets. Beowulf enjoys universal appeal primarily because of its elements of characterization, plot and theme that prove timeless. Beowulf’s portrayal of human nature proves eternal. The protagonist Beowulf brashly lists his accomplishments before entering battle: "But the truth

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    Archetypal Characters and Symbols in The Phantom of the Opera The story of The Phantom of the Opera appeals to many types of personalities and people of all ages because of its archetypal characters and patterns.  Carl Jung theorized that we are born with innate tendencies to perceive things a certain way:  "a kind of readiness to reproduce over and over again the same or similar mythical ideas . . ."1.  These repeated ideas are archetypes.  The basic legend of The Phantom takes place in 19th

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    The early modern novel had no definite divisions between fantasy and realism. Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, for instance, has universal appeal in that it deals with and develops real moral and psychological issues, but the narrative still depends upon extraordinary settings and events (Konigsberg 18). Also, Defoe used a fictional "editor," and preface, among other things, to make his work seem like an authentic document and therefore a worthwhile read. As the literary form evolved, novelists began

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    Marketing Strategy for the Mars Ice Cream Bar My Aims for this Report In this report I will be focusing my attention on Mars Ice Cream Bar. I will investigate how they promote their product. I will do this by investigating how they advertise their product, and where, as well as looking at how they package their product and at the same time I will look at where they sell the Mars ice cream bar. Also I will be investigating their main rivals and compare their marketing mix’s. This will

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    The Internet as a Learning Tool

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    The Internet as a Learning Tool The Internet has a universal appeal for most people. We (in the United States) have become dependant on it for our daily routines. We shop, send mail, read the news, look up movie reviews, etc., using the Internet. We depend on this service, because we have told ourselves that "It" has made our lives easier. We advocate the use of similar technologies within the classroom, because we are convinced that the use of computers and having access to the Internet is

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    tragedy using song and dance, elements of racism and nationalism, and a modern vernacular. Robbins called upon the musical talents of composer Leonard Bernstein and the words of Arthur Laurents for the script and book. The love story proved to have universal appeal throughout all artistic forms, as it had already been adjusted for opera and ballet. The contemporary adaptation of this timeless classic alters details and deepens the message of hatred, but maintains Brooke and Shakespeare’s vision. The relationships

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    African-Americans into an art form with universal appeal.  Gloria Naylor explains this struggle by stating, "The writers I had been taught to love were either male or white.  And who was I to argue that Ellison, Austen, Dickens, the Brontes, Baldwin and Faulkner weren't masters?  They were and are.  But inside there was still the faintest whisper: Was there no one telling my story?" (qtd. in Erickson 232).  Naylor, in her quest to make the western cannon more universal, readapts the classics.  By the use

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    Koestler, a refugee from Fascist and Communist prisons, was the model for protagonist of 1984 - Winston Smith. Orwell chose this name because he felt that the reader could relate to Winston. By using the last name 'Smith' it conveys the universal appeal of everyman. The name Winston was chosen because Winston Churchill ruled England at the time and was seen as a hero. (Gardner 118) From this, Orwell puts forth the idea that anyone can do anything and rise to greatness. The physical setting

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    Pagan Burial Rites in the Epic of Beowulf

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    influence on the Beowulf poet. Most notable Beowulf scholars such as Kl‘ber, Robinson and Whitelock do not fail to address the matter. Given the complexity of the issue and the proliferation of evidence within the poem, we can understand the universal appeal of this topic. The poet transposes his Christian convictions onto a story which formed in a culture devoid of Christianity. In many instances, however, the poem's pagan basis shines through. Among these idiosyncracies it is important to note

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    soliloquy is arguably the most famous soliloquy in the history of the theatre. Even today, 400 years after it was written, most people are vaguely familiar with the soliloquy even though they may not know the play. What gives these 34 lines such universal appeal and recognition? What about Hamlet's introspection has prompted scholars and theatregoers alike to ask questions about their own existence over the centuries? In this soliloquy, Shakespeare strikes a chord with a fundamental human concern:

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    Walt Whitman's Influence on Germany

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    numerous reasons. For his time he was truly unconventional and introduced the modern lyric with his autobiographical collection of prose poems called Leaves of Grass. The impact Whitman has, however, exceeds technical innovation; it lies in his universal appeal. Walt Whitman is many things to many people. The poet once remarked about the various photographs of himself he used to come upon, "I meet new Walt Whitmans every day. There are a dozen of me afloat." Perhaps even more manifold than the physical

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    Characterization within the Drama Hamlet

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    Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet – whether they are three-dimensional or two-dimensional, dynamic or static, etc. The genius of the Bard is revealed in his characterization. Brian Wilkie and James Hurt in Literature of the Western World examine the universal appeal of  Shakespeare resulting from his “sharply etched characters”: Every age from Shakespeare’s time to the present has found something different in him to admire. All ages, however, have recognized his supreme skill in inventing sharply

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    The Characterization within Hamlet

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    level, to transform a ranting roistering abstraction into a thing at once tender and majestical. (56-57) The genius of the Bard is revealed in his characterization. Brian Wilkie and James Hurt in Literature of the Western World examine the universal appeal of  Shakespeare resulting from his “sharply etched characters”: Every age from Shakespeare’s time to the present has found something different in him to admire. All ages, however, have recognized his supreme skill in inv... ... middle

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    and independent woman standing up to an oppressive and dominating society; the lead character, Nora, abandons not only her husband, but her entire family, in an effort to discover herself and become a liberated woman.  The play is known for its universal appeal, and the strong blow it dealt to a male-dominated society, by showing not only that a woman could break free from the restraints which society placed upon her, but that men were actually quite powerless in the face of a strong woman; Nora's husband

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    Othello – its Appeal

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    Othello – its Appeal Let us examine the William Shakespeare drama Othello for the purpose of determining exactly what characteristics of the play are the outstanding ones which give it such universal appeal. Othello would appear to have a beauty about it which is hard to match. Helen Gardner in “Othello: A Tragedy of Beauty and Fortune” touches on this beauty which enables this play to stand above the other tragedies of the Bard: Among the tragedies of Shakespeare Othello is supreme

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