Free Universal Appeal Essays and Papers

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Free Universal Appeal Essays and Papers

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    Othello – the Universal Appeal

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    Othello – the Universal Appeal For 400 years the audience has found William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello to be relevant to their lives and tastes. Why? What enduring qualities does the play possess in order to ensure its continuing success? Does the reason lie in the great heterogeneity of characters and scenes and actions within the play?  Robert B. Heilman in “The Role We Give Shakespeare” relates the universality of Shakespeare to the “innumerableness of the parts”: But the

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    William Shakespeare's Universal Appeal "Shakespeare's plays have universal appeal" Shakespeare's plays deal with aspects of the human condition this is what makes his plays have Universal appeal. The human condition contains issues and emotions that appear in everyday life, for example love and power are both elements of the human condition. As Shakespeare's plays deal with this they not only have a timeless quality, as emotions do not change over centuries even though other issues might

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    effectively incorporates timeless components. The epic poem relates the tale of Beowulf, a warrior who throughout his life overcomes evils. It has strong elements of Anglo-Saxon elements of bravery, strength and of religious tenets. Beowulf enjoys universal appeal primarily because of its elements of characterization, plot and theme that prove timeless. Beowulf’s portrayal of human nature proves eternal. The protagonist Beowulf brashly lists his accomplishments before entering battle: "But the truth

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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality What secrets of dramatic genius underpin the universal acceptance of Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet so long after its composition? Harold Bloom in the Introduction to Modern Critical Interpretations: Hamlet explains one very solid basis for the universal appeal of this drama -- the popular innovation in characterization made by the Bard: Before Shakespeare, representations in literature may change as they speak, but they do not change because of what they

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    The Internet as a Learning Tool

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    The Internet as a Learning Tool The Internet has a universal appeal for most people. We (in the United States) have become dependant on it for our daily routines. We shop, send mail, read the news, look up movie reviews, etc., using the Internet. We depend on this service, because we have told ourselves that "It" has made our lives easier. We advocate the use of similar technologies within the classroom, because we are convinced that the use of computers and having access to the Internet is

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    I strongly disagree with Isabel Paterson’s opinion. I do not think The Great Gatsby lacks universal appeal at all. Many of the issues touched upon in the story can be directly connected or related to events that are still happening in today’s society. To say that this book is only good for one time period is not realistic due to all the proof against it. The importance of wealth is demonstrated in the book by showing Gatsby’s popularity due to his wealth, which allows him to throw extravagant parties

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    Koestler, a refugee from Fascist and Communist prisons, was the model for protagonist of 1984 - Winston Smith. Orwell chose this name because he felt that the reader could relate to Winston. By using the last name 'Smith' it conveys the universal appeal of everyman. The name Winston was chosen because Winston Churchill ruled England at the time and was seen as a hero. (Gardner 118) From this, Orwell puts forth the idea that anyone can do anything and rise to greatness. The physical setting

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    Archetypal Characters and Symbols in The Phantom of the Opera The story of The Phantom of the Opera appeals to many types of personalities and people of all ages because of its archetypal characters and patterns.  Carl Jung theorized that we are born with innate tendencies to perceive things a certain way:  "a kind of readiness to reproduce over and over again the same or similar mythical ideas . . ."1.  These repeated ideas are archetypes.  The basic legend of The Phantom takes place in 19th

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    soliloquy is arguably the most famous soliloquy in the history of the theatre. Even today, 400 years after it was written, most people are vaguely familiar with the soliloquy even though they may not know the play. What gives these 34 lines such universal appeal and recognition? What about Hamlet's introspection has prompted scholars and theatregoers alike to ask questions about their own existence over the centuries? In this soliloquy, Shakespeare strikes a chord with a fundamental human concern:

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    Hamlet – its Universality

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    Hamlet – its Universality Shakespeare’s tragic play Hamlet is an excellent example, perhaps the best in English literature, of a work that has universal appeal. This essay will analyze the incredible universality of this drama, with the input of literary critics. Robert B. Heilman in “The Role We Give Shakespeare” relates the universality of Shakespeare to the “innumerableness of the parts”: But the Shakespeare completeness appears graspable and possessable to many men at odds

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