Free United States copyright law Essays and Papers

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    Software Piracy and Copyright Laws: United States versus Vietnam I. Introduction "Software piracy is the unauthorized duplication, distribution or use of computer software". Five main types of software piracy exist: publisher patent and copyright infringement, industrial piracy, corporate piracy, reseller piracy, and home piracy. Software piracy is a large global issue, which has become a more pressing issue due to a number of reasons: software is now easier to distribute on a global scale

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    Copyright Laws of Argentina-(Liz Marroquin) Argentina 's first copyright law was created all the way back in 1933. Today section 2 of this law gives copyright owners almost complete control over there work. After 70 years copyrighted work falls into public domain and Argentina is one of the few countries left to enforce a tax to users who wish to use works in public domain. The tax is a pretty big issue there and and back in 2012 the government tried to pass a bill where public libraries, archives

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    bill official introduction titled; “A bill to amend title 17, United States Code, to implement the Berne Convention of the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, as revised at Paris on July 24, 1971, and other purposes. The “Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988” ( hereafter referred to as “Berne Act” throughout this report) was approved October 31, 1988 and went into force in the United States on March 1, 1989 as Public Law 100-568-Oct. 31, 1988. The “Berne Act” was created to protect

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    Emerging Economies: Copyright Law and Enforcement in Pakistan Introduction The United States and Pakistan have similar laws protecting software using copyright and patents despite being at very different stages of economic development. Pakistan has an emerging economy with a per capita GDP of $2000 per capita and a literacy rate of 46%.[i] The US has a more mature economy with per capita GDP of $37,600 and a 97% literacy rate[ii]. Despite having similar laws regarding copyright and patent protection

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    The Digital Millennium Copyright Act

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    The Digital Millennium Copyright Act Signed into law by President Clinton on October 28, 1998, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) "was the foundation of an effort by Congress to implement United States treaty obligations and to move the nation's copyright law into the digital age." ("Executive Summary DMCA Report") While this seems a valid description of the law, perhaps a more accurate interpretation lies in the following statement: "The DMCA is a piece of legislation rushed through

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    Copyright From a Computer Perspective

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    Copyright From a Computer Perspective Copyright, is one of nine Muses that inspires authors in modern society during the creative process. Copyright is a category of intellectual property, and the main idea behind intellectual property is to encourage creation, by ensuring authors with recognition of original works as their own. Copyright protects original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression by giving authors exclusive right to copy, distribute, and to create derivative

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    Copyright laws are a form of governance designed to protect the intellectual property of authors, inventors, and other individuals creating innovations or inventions. Intellectual property consists of published and unpublished books, manuscripts, paintings, music works, sound recordings, movies, choreographic works, architectural works, sculptures, and even pantomime works among others (Copyright Works, 2012). The World Intellectual Property Organization states that: "Intellectual property (IP) refers

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    What is Copyright?

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    What is “Copyright”? What is “Fair Use”? To all, these words are a meaning of protection. Ironically, one represents the law and the other is debatable under the law. Copyright.com best defines copyright in the United States as “a form of protection provided by the government to the authors of ‘original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works.’ This protection is available to both published and unpublished works, regardless of the

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    Copyrights in the Music Industry

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    obtain a copyright. Music has been around before anyone could obtain a copyright and when the invention of the computer came along it made it easier for someone to steal another artist's intellectual property with the help of the internet. This paper will cover what events have taken a big role in copyright protection for artist, the consequences if someone was to break the rules of a copyright which is called copyright infringement, and how will a copyright hold in the future. Were copyrights enacted

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    Who Owns Music

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    Music in the Biblical Period BIBLICAL PERIOD."Pauljerveymonzaga. N.p., 14 Mar. 2012. Web. 05 Feb. 2014. Lotha, Gloria. "Berne Convention (copyright Law)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, 06 Mar. 2013. Web. 05 Feb. 2014. "Limitation." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, n.d. Web. 06 Feb. 2014. "U.S. Copyright Office - Fair Use." U.S. Copyright Office - Fair Use. N.p., June 2012. Web. 05 Feb. 2014.

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    The objective of the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) is to protect those who create works, such as artistic works or literary works, as well as those other subject matter, such as films or sounds recordings, from those who would serve to exploit or profit from their labor, skill and creativity. But, what about those who use these protected works and other subject matter for interests different to the above? Such as for educational purposes or for broadcasting? Under the act, there are listed many defences

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    Internet Copyright Laws

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    Internet Copyright Laws A student comes home to his dorm at the University of Scranton after a rough day of classes. With the quick internet connection provided on the school’s network, the student makes a few clicks and logs into Morpheus, a program that enables music fans to download free music. Within a few minutes he is on his way to owning an unlimited amount of songs at no cost. Everything this student is doing is legal, right? Wrong. The downloaded music from the internet is copyrighted

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    The Digitial Millenium Copyright Act As current lawsuits unfold and the history of the Internet progresses, the debate over the future of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act thrives. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act, signed into law by President Clinton on October 28, 1998, was written in an attempt to strike a balance between the rights of a work’s creator to receive adequate compensation and society’s fundamental right to freedom of information. The bottom line is that the objective of

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    Copyright and Fair Use

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    Copyright and fair use are prominent topics in today’s society where mass pirating of copyrighted material occurs. A product is considered copyrighted “when something is put into ‘tangible form’ the creator of the work owns a copyright,” (Simpson, 2005). Such tangible forms include movies, books, music, and etc. (Simpson, 2005). Therefore, “copyright is the law of the United States that protects the works of authors, artists, composers, and other from being used without permission,” (Cyberbee

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    quantities. This makes it very difficult to effectively enforce anti-piracy laws, as the officials cannot raid each and every home in search of illegal copies of copyrighted software. In India, with a population of over 1 billion, effective enforcement of anti-piracy laws is a ponderous task. The government of India possesses neither the will nor the finances to dedicate a chunk of its budget to enforcing copyright infringement laws. Another problem is that to control expenditure of monitoring and convicting

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    There are several laws in place that involve copyright and libraries. These laws each affect public libraries and the resources they provide to community members in distinctive ways. The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on October 28, 1998. There are five titles included in the DMCA. Title one enacts the WIPO Treaties in the United States. Title two creates limitations on the liability of online service providers for copyright infringement when

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    taken down for copyright infringement. But not as many people know that without that, YouTube could be shut down. Since the printing press was invented, copyright has existed to secure the livelihood of content creators. The idea of copyright is that an author can continue to sell their work without fear of mass reproduction without compensation. This way, content owners are able to pay for housing, materials, food, and other necessities to support them and their families. Without copyright, anyone who

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    Music Copyright

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    is a Copyright? Music Copyright is a very important aspect of the music industry. The Copyright law was established to preserve the creativity and rights of authors, composers, performers of expression. Copyright is the law that protects the property rights of the creator of an original work in a fixed tangible medium. (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/copyright) A fixed tangible medium is something substantial like copying lyrics on paper or putting a song on tape or CD. Copyright can be

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    The Failure of Software Copyright Law

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    The Failure of Software Copyright Law A Definition With the Copyright Act of 1980, the following was added to the existing copyright laws: A "computer program" is a set of statements or instructions to be used directly or indirectly in a computer in order to bring about a certain result.1 A "program" or "software" instructs the "hardware," the computer, in its task of adding, storing, exchanging data, etc.2 At the base level, a program is simply a mathematical algorithm, a stream

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    Copyright Essay

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    Is Copyright An Outdated Concept In The Light of New Technologies? [2,500] The rise of new technologies has created a new consumer mindset that demands a different approach to copyright than the one that was originally created. With the advent of the digital age, copyright has become ever more present in consumers day-to-day lives. The rise of the personal computer alongside the Internet has meant that copyrighted materials are now easier than ever to access, whether this be legitimately or otherwise

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