Free United States Bill of Rights Essays and Papers

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Free United States Bill of Rights Essays and Papers

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    first amendment guaranteed the people of the United States the freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom of religion, freedom of assembly, and freedom of petition. Although the first amendment guarantees us, Americans the freedom of speech, we cannot use it to cause others harm. This amendment has helped shaped Americans into what we are today, because of our right to assemble, speak freely, and worship as we please. Before the United States became its own country, the colonies were tormented

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    The Bill of Rights and Protection of Civil Liberties When the English came to America to escape religious persecution, things commenced at a shaky start. For example, Puritans fled from England because of religious persecution. They were being physically beaten because of their religious beliefs therefore they attempted to create a Utopia or "City upon a hill" in the New World. There "City upon a hill" began with a government based on religious beliefs. It developed into a government

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    Bill of Rights

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    The Bill of Rights as it stands for the United States entered as a stems from a vow as promises so to speak was made by the Fathers of Confederation to the states during the effort for ratification of the Constitution in 1787-1788. Numerous states had created some conditions for their ratification; the appendage of amendments, which would assure citizen’s a safeguard like a safety net for their human rights in contrast to the central government and therefore the people had a rather remarkable circumstances

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    In the United States, the Bill of Rights is the name by which the first ten amendments to the U. S. Constitution are known. It was introduced by James Madison to the First U.S. Congress in 1791 as a series of constitutional amendments. The Bill of Rights came into effect on December 15, 1791 when about three fourths of the states were ratified. The bill of rights limits the power of the Federal government of the United States so it is protecting the rights of all of the citizens, residents and visitors

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    of section one, ? All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, as citizens of the United States and of the state where in they reside? citizenship was universalized. The Amendment was designed to prohibit state governments from curtailing the rights of former slaves after the Civil War, however it has been used to grant all of the personal liberties and rights conveyed in the Bill of Rights. The Amendment gives definition to citizenship, requires

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    THE BILL OF RIGHTS The United States Bill of Rights came into being as a result of a promise made by the Fathers of Confederation to the states during the struggle for ratification of the Constitution in 1787-88. A great number of the states made as a condition for their ratification, the addition of amendments, which would guarantee citizens protection of their rights against the central government. Thus, we have a rather interesting situation in which the entrenchment of a bill of rights in the

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    Articles of Confederation. A new constitution was needed. The one that we know today with its Bill of rights and multiple amendments. The U.S. constitution did not originally have the Bill of Rights when it was ratified in 1787 (Bingham). Anti-federalists, who feared the power of the government, demanded the inclusion of the Bill of Rights. This was in opposition to the Federalists, who believed the Bill was not necessary (Bingham). These two arguing sides, the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, consisted

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    There is no other government in the world that gives freedom to the people like the United States of America. In the last sixty years, American courts, have made a set of legal doctrines that protect all forms of the freedom of expression. The First Amendment is a great respect toward the freedom of religion. It also prevents the government from "abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances

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    The Bill of Rights

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    Introduction The Bill of Rights was created because the states believed that the federal government would have too much power and they wanted to have more individual rights. Around this time the colonies had just been under the British rule, which oppressed the people and give them very limited freedoms. The states or the colonies were kind of afraid that this would happen all over again within this new government forming in the form of the Constitution. Most of the state at this time believed that

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    Bill of Rights

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    The “Bill of rights” had been proposed as a follow up to Parliament’s original Habeas Corpus bill, which safeguarded personal freedom and liberty. Now just about every colony had a bill of rights, so James Madison suggested that if the United States was to survived as a a country it would need to have a set of rules versus thirtheen and every state would have the same rules. In 1789, James Madison proposed a series of legislative articles to the first United States congress, but the processes took

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