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    Underwater Acoustics

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    My Communications coursework will be on non-radio communications. My chosen topic is underwater acoustics. The applications of underwater acoustics and their advantages and disadvantages will be studied. All forms of non-radio communications are based on waves. Waves are generally a disturbance in a surface, transferring energy from A to B. Waves can be mechanical vibrations travel through a medium. For example: water, sound. These waves are called mechanical waves. Progressive waves are

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    The Effect of Underwater Acoustics on Whales

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    The Effect of Underwater Acoustics on Whales Whales utilize acoustic frequencies to communicate underwater. If the whales are unable to communicate their bi-annual migration can become perilous. Man-made low frequency sonarcan prevent whales from producing soundand sometimes causes them to take alternate routes. When the whales try to avoid the sonar they are in danger of running ashore and perishing after being beached. Introduction: Twice a year, around the months of December and

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    UNDERWATER WIRELESS COMMUNICATION The communication between any two entities can be either wired or wireless. The concept of wireless technology was started in the year 1923. As we all know that 70% of the earth is full covered with water. It was necessary to develop wireless network that can also work under water. Here arises the concept of acoustic waves. Acoustic wave’s works better in water .Also it can travel long distance inside water and are very fast than radio waves. The concept of underwater

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    Singh, Hanumant; Adams, Jonathan; Mindell, David; and Foley, Brendan 2000 Imaging Underwater for Archaeology. Journal of Field Archaeology volume 27 number 3: 319-328. The article by the various authors listed above concentrated on the various techniques that are used to locate and then to excavate these sites. They list and discuss the various techniques that they use. These vary from side-scanning to locate the sites to high resolution video to see how the site appears and the various locations

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    Acoustic levitation to help Medicines Unless you travel into the vacuum of space, sound is all around you every day.. You hear sounds; you don't touch them. But as the vibrations that sound creates in other objects. The idea that something so intangible can lift objects can seem unbelievable, but it's a real phenomenon. Acoustic levitation takes advantage of the properties of sound to cause solids,and liquids to float. The process can take place in normal or reduced gravity. To understand how acoustic

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    Oedipus, The Movie

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    Oedipus, The Movie After reading the play Oedipus the King, I had various expectations related to how the movie should be performed. The stage presentation of the story fulfilled some of my expectations but failed to satisfy others. Most importantly, the performance was an accurate rendering of the play. The characters in the movie were developed effectively and were portrayed precisely as I had perceived them. I thought that the movie lacked qualities including stage design, clothing, and

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    information simultaneously and Avoidance tasks which involve the animal avoiding a location where they have previously received a shock. Other behavioral traits that have been assessed are aggressiveness, reproductive behavior and the effects of acoustic startle where the reaction of a mouse to a loud noise is measured as well as its reaction when the sound is preceded by a relatively quiet sound The effects of genetic strains have also been studied with regard to their effects on certain drugs

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    are trains, planes, and automobiles. Industrial and construction noise can also contribute to external noise. In order to better define the noise present in a classroom, we must look at the classroom acoustics when the classroom is unoccupied and compare that to when the classroom is occupied. Acoustic standards recommended that maximum background noise levels for classrooms smaller than 10,000 ft3 do not exceed 35 dBA. Reverberation time (RT) should not exceed 0.6 seconds (ANSI SOURCE). Sadly, many

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    Sarvar Aliyev First Draft How it sounds to be 18. Presumably, everyone knows that seeing and hearing are the two main senses of people and the fundamentals of our life. These two sentiments are the essences for all human efforts. Although, both of these two higher senses might seem evenly significant, it is not always figured out that hearing has the more substantial effect in identifying the character of our lives. A dog barks, a sheep bleats

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    Emergency Siren Vehicle (Dorset Ambulance)

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    Emergency siren vehicle (Dorset Ambulance) Introduction Each and Every-day occurrence for many drivers they here sound of an emergency vehicle siren, that might be from an ambulance, police car or fire engine. Emergency siren vehicle transportation is allowed after you had a sudden medical emergency, when your health is in danger conditions. When emergency siren is heared by drivers or passengers they look across and they will try to check from which way the sounds are approaching. There should

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    Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder. AOS affects an individual’s ability to motor plan. Individuals with AOS have difficulty saying what they want to say correctly and consistently. These individuals struggle with putting sounds and syllables together in the correct order to produce words. AOS most commonly occurs in adults, though it can affect an individual of any age. The most frequent etiology of AOS is a cerebrovascular accident also known as a stroke (Duffy, 2013).

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    creating simple complex musical pieces while gaining dexterity and technique. They can learn musical processes with keyboards and have fun at the same time. Electronic instruments can also be used in performance to enhance traditional and electronical-acoustics ensembles. A musical performance consists of a series of sounds played in time with appropriate tempo and dynamic changes. MIDI data, however, consists of a stream of information of note events generated by the electronic controller device. This

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    Nt1310 Unit 5 Lab 7

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    • 43,900 USD Specification: • +17 dBm 3rd order intercept at 2 GHz • ±0.3 dB absolute amplitude accuracy to 3 GHz • Displayed average noise level: –142 dBm/Hz at 26.5 GHz, –157 dBm/Hz at 2 GHz and –150 dBm/Hz at 10 kHz • Internal Preamp available: DANL of -156 dBm/Hz at 26.5 GHz, -167 dBm/Hz at 2 GHz • Phase noise: –113 dBc/Hz at 1 GHz and –134 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz carrier frequency, 10 kHz offset • High-speed sweeps with high resolution and low noise: 1 GHz sweeps at 10 kHz RBW in by monitoring

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    Ultrasound History

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    Ultrasound is one of the most vital inventions in women health care. The advancement of wave technology throughout history formed the basis for the ultrasound. Ultrasound history is embedded in innovations on wave technology (Woo, 2015). Earlier designs of ultrasonic devices were not in the field of medicine until in the 1950s (Woo, 2015). Even then, the devices were employed for therapy before they were improved and used for diagnosis. Ultrasonic are waves that have a high frequency that cannot

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    Speech Sound Disorders

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    Speech sound disorders (SSD) are the most common communication disorder in the pediatric population, impacting approximately 10 to 15 percent of children between 4 and 5 years old (Gierut, 1998 & McLeod & Harrison, 2009). SSDs result in speech intelligibility, occurring from difficulties in motor production of speech, phonological awareness of vowels and consonants, syllable discrimination, and the ability to understand rhythm, stress, and intonation of words (Bowen, 2015). Children diagnosed with

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    Ultrasound Waves

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    hypoechoic image from scanning some masses and fatty plaque. Since you can have something with low echogenicity you can also have an image with high echogenicity which we refer to as hyperechoic. This means that along with having a significantly different acoustic impedance there is also less attenuation due to absorption but more attenuation due to reflection. Being hyperechoic you will have higher reflected signals which can make something (like fibrous plaque) appear to be brighter than the surrounding

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    Physics of Music

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    oscillations--how the signals are emitted by the instruments and received by the listeners. Music itself, however, is made by how the listener interprets or experiences those signals. As stated in Levarie and Levy's, Tone, A study in Musical Acoustics, "Music is not 'something that happens in the air.' It is something that happens in the soul."

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    Digital Audio

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    • Introduction Technology has paved a way for us to appreciate music in a more personal and convenient ways. Gone are the days that we need a huge investment, wide space and a stationary action for us to appreciate quality music: the CDs and walkmans that render us immobile, the lack of good earphone technology, and even the low-quality amplifiers have been gone. A more interesting part in the technology that incorporates sound and music, however, is on how studios and computers facilitate recording

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    Beats by Dr. Dre: Not the Average Headphones.

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    What brings out the best music listening experience for people? How can we achieve that optimal listening experience? The best listening experience, differs to many people because some believe the best experience from music comes from the bass, some prefer dynamics and the highs and lows, others enjoy noise cancellation and the rest enjoy all of the aspects listed. Whatever the sound preference might be, there must be a worthy headphone in the market that addresses all these aspects of the music

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    Without the use of physics in the medical field today, diagnosis of problems would be challenging, to say the least. The world of medical imaging in particular has benefited greatly from the use of physics. Ultrasound is sound waves that have a frequency above human audible. (Ultrasound Physics and Instrument 111). With a shorter wavelength than audible sound, these waves can be directed into a narrow beam that is used in imaging soft tissues. As with audible sound waves, ultrasound waves must

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