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Free Understanding Alzheimer Essays and Papers

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    Exploring Alzheimer's Disease

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    irritable. Families often become impoverished before the patient is eligible to receive financial support. Furthermore, almost half of the family caregivers become clinically depressed. In the last few years, research has made great strides in understanding this Alzheimer's. Specifically, in the areas of ne... ... middle of paper ... ...acetylcholine is released into a synapse and then connects with a receptor. Works Cited Connor, B.; Young, D.; Yan, Q.; Faull, R.L.M.; Synek, B.; Dragunow

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    they reach the age of eighty-five.(r.1) Scientists have been studying the disease for many years now in hope to find answers to a cure for this depressive disease. The disease is persistently being studied with the hope of cures, and a better understanding of how one person can conquer Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease contains no known single cause. Scientists are patiently and determinedly studying every aspect of the disease in hope to establish a precise cause. Late-onset Alzheimer’s cause

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    Alzheimer's Disease, progressive brain disorder that causes a gradual and irreversible decline in memory, language skills, perception of time and space, and, eventually, the ability to care for oneself. First described by German psychiatrist Alois Alzheimer in 1906, Alzheimer's disease was initially thought to be a rare condition affecting only young people, and was referred to as presenile dementia. Today late-onset Alzheimer's disease is recognised as the most common cause of the loss of mental function

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    Alzheimer's Disease: What are we Forgetting?

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    thinking and behavior. It was first described by Dr. Alois Alzheimer in 1906 and has been diagnosed in millions of people to this day (1). This disease results, ultimately, in the destruction of the brain and brings new meaning and insights into just how much brain may equal behavior. Alzheimers is a degenerative disease that usually begins gradually, causing a person to have memory lapses in both basic knowledge and simple tasks (7). Alzheimers disease causes the formation of abnormal structures in

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    The Role of Genetics in Alzheimer's Disease

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    if they take care of themselves. Let us start with some general history and facts and then proceed to the specifics. Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is named after a German doctor, Alois Alzheimer. He discovered the disease in 1906, while doing an autopsy on a woman who had died from an unusual mental illness. Dr. Alzheimer noted unique changes in the brain tissue (U.S 1995). His findings included clumps, which are also known as plaques, and tangled fibers, also called neurofibrillary tangles. These findings

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    Alzheimer's Disease is a condition that affects 50% of the population over the age of eighty five, which equals four million Americans each year. It is becoming an important and high-profile issue in today's society for everyone. There are rapid advancements being made in the fight against this disease now more than ever, and the purpose of this essay is to educate the public on the background as well as the new discoveries. There are many new drugs that are being tested and studied every day which

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    Alzheimers Disease

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    Alzheimer's Disease Introduction to Alzheimer's Alzheimer's disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain. It is first described by the German neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) in 1905. This disease worsens with advancing age, although there is no evidence that it is cause by the aging process. The average life expectancy of a person with the disease is between five and ten years, but some patients today can live up to 15 years due to improvements in care and

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    Nursing Care and Understanding of Alzheimer Disease Introduction Loss of memory, forgetfulness, personal change, even death, are common related disorders caused by a disease called Dementia or better known to most people as Alzheimer’s disease. This disease is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States in persons 65 and older. Alzheimer’s disease is, named for the German neurologist Alois Alzheimer, who first recognized the disease in 1907; Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by a progressive

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s is a disease of the brain that causes a steady decline in memory. This results in dementia, which is loss of intellectual functions severe enough to interfere with everyday life. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting ten percent of people over 65 years old, and nearly 50 percent of those age 85 or older. My grandmother was diagnosed with “probable” Alzheimer’s disease over two years ago. After finding this out, I wanted to know more

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    Alzheimer's Disease and Down's Syndrome

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    Alzheimer and Down's Syndrome Down?s Syndrome, Trisomy 21, or Mongolism is one of the most common causes of mental retardation. The majority of Down?s Syndrome patients have a moderate retardation although it can range from mild to severe. Trisomy 21 occurs in about 1 in 800 live births. This incidence increases markedly as the age of the mother increases over 35. The prevalence in children born to young mothers is 1 in 1000, while it increases to almost 1 in 40 in children born to mothers over

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