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Free Understanding Alzheimer Essays and Papers

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    Understanding Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer's Disease is a progressive and irreversible brain disease that destroys mental and physical functioning in human beings, and invariably leads to death. It is the fourth leading cause of adult death in the United States. Alzheimer's creates emotional and financial catastrophe for many American families every year. Fortunately, a large amount of progress is being made to combat Alzheimer's disease every year. To fully be able to comprehend and

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    Alzheimer's Disease: a hopeless battle?

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    considered abnormal and the leading cause for dementia, otherwise known as Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's was named after the German physician Dr. Alois Alzheimer who discovered the disease in 1906 in a middle-aged woman with dementia. After her autopsy, two abnormal brain structures were found that today are fundamental in understanding the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The disease basically consists of a gradual reduction of the brain size due to the fact that its nerve cells one by one

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    1906, the German neurologist Alois Alzheimer began an autopsy of a woman from Frankfurt, that had died after several years of progressive mental deterioration. From the accounts of the doctor, family, and friends of the woman, Alzheimer put together her mental state prior to death, and described the woman as being marked by increased confusion, disorientation, and memory loss.Taking advantage of staining techniques that had recently been established, Alzheimer noticed an odd disorganization of the

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    Disease and People with Mental Retardation, Good Detailed Site http://www.thearc.org/faqs/almr.html 10)Developmental Disabilities and Alzheimer's Disease, Good Detailed Site by The Arc http://www.thearc.org/misc/alzbk.html 11)Epidemiology of Alzheimer Disease in Mental Retardation, Periodicals Index http://www.aamr.org/index.shtml 12)Fact Sheet: Alzheimer's Disease, Family Caregiver Alliance http://www.caregiver.org/factsheets/diagnoses/alzheimers.html 13)Harvard Researchers Link Alzheimer's

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    Times http://www.latimes.com/HOME/NEWS/SCIENCE/REPORTS/%20THEBRAIN/brain.htm (8) ... http://neuro-www.mgh.harvard.edu/forum/AlzheimersDiseaseF/MyFeelingsAboutThis.html (9) Memories in the Making, a program of creative art expression for Alzheimer patients http://www.coa.uky.edu/ADReview/memories.htm

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    Alzheimer’s disease is a slowly progressive, degenerative disorder of the brain that eventually results in abnormal brain function and death. The disease was first described in 1907 by a German physician, Dr. Alois Alzheimer(1864-1915). In the neurological autopsy on the brain of a 56-year-old woman Auguste D., of Frankfurt, who died after several years of progressive mental deterioration marked by increasing confusion and memory loss. Taking advantage of a then-new staining technique, he noticed

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    Dementia is the lost of thinking, remembering and reasoning so bad it screws up ability to do daily functions and eventually resolves in death. Dr. Alois Alzheimer’s first discovered the disease in 1906. Since then research has developed a deeper understanding of the changes in the brain. Warning sign’s of Alzheimer's are memory loss that affects home and job skills, problem in speaking, poor judgment, and difficulty in learning. The last stage of Alzheimer's disease is when you’re unable to take care

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    Alzheimer's Disease

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    that is affecting more and more people. Works Cited Page Coogle, Constance (October 2000). Alzheimer’s Disease and Hospice. Alzheimer’s Association Newsletter, 1-2. Cutler, Neal R., M.D., and Sramek, John J., Pharm D. Understanding Alkzheimer’s Disease. University Press of Mississippi., 1996. Doraswamy, P. Murali, M.D. Update on Alzheimer’s Disease. NC: Chapel Hill. 1997. Geldmacher, D.S. (1997). Donepezil (Aricept) Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease. Comprehensive Therapy;

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    Alzheimer’s Disease

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    promising new approach for understanding AD in view of the evidence that there is a familiar factor present in the disease (4). In several studies, over one thi... ... middle of paper ... ...scular disease, Parkinson’s disease, hydrocephalus, amyotrophic lateral and multiple sclerosis, and dementia’s resulting from tumors and brain injuries. In light of all this, with an aging population, it is clear to see the need for further study in order to gain a better understanding of the cause and parameters

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    Pathology and Current Treatment of the Alzheimer's Disease Introduction One of the most feared aspects of aging is the deterioration of the memory and cognitive function (dementia) that occurs among the elderly with increasing frequency with advancing years. A significant proportion of otherwise healthy elderly persons show a significant decline in mental function later in life. It has been estimated that 10% of the population over the age of 65 suffers from mild to moderate dementia and

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