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Free Underdeveloped Countries Essays and Papers

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    Underdeveloped Countries and the War on Drugs With the presidential election peering around the corner, it is time to bring back an age-old topic which has been troubling United States citizens for decades, the War on Drugs. Politicians have long quarreled over what sort of action should be taken to combat the world’s drug problems, and it is time that this issue surfaces again. Despite increased efforts from every government faction imaginable, the drug problem subsists, if not worsens. The

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    Women Health and education in underdeveloped countries Substantial health disparities exist in women in underdeveloped countries because of the lack of education. As most of the underdeveloped countries are patriarchal (male dominated), women are confined to working at home and are unpaid or underpaid even if they work outside. Their desires to making health decisions are undermined by their family’s expectations. More often than not, they are required to defer to other in making health decisions

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    the community. We know this to have greater effects on underdeveloped and developing countries because they don’t have the public education system like wealthier countries. Countries like the U.S, France, England, and Germany have illiterate citizens however the illiteracy rate isn’t as prevalent. This is due to the access to public education and the right each man, woman and child has in these developed countries. Education in “Rich ” countries are thought to be the best in the world, however there

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    Prosperity and Violence in Developed vs Underdeveloped Countries The best examples of the trade off between prosperity and violence are attributed in Bates to the early developers, whose' success story stands in contrast to the prospect of the late developers who's situation is fundamentally related to their historical relationship with the developed nations. In order to come to an understanding of the trade off between prosperity and violence it is therefore necessary to establish the

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    The Problems with Human Population

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    all countries would create a population policy that would attempt to help the countries deal with social, economic and cultural development. Although the United States has a large population problem to deal with of its own, underdeveloped countries hold 80 percent of the worlds population and are unable to provide methods of birth control, leaving people no choice other than abstinence. A question we are forced to ask ourselves is: Should we help fund family planning in third world countries, or

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    Foeign Affairs

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    the world and if those places of business are not ensured safety then both the economy of that particular country as well as our own is affected. Adding onto that, America is not a self-sufficient country. We have to import oil, food, and much of our merchandise. The days of when Americans worked in sweatshops is long gone, for we now usually rely on overpopulated and underdeveloped countries to do the dirty work. Internally, America has a very strange economic system. While some families own massive

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    In underdeveloped countries there are a number of reasons why children don’t stay in school and not only because of family income. In underdeveloped countries hardships children have to face that don’t allow them to be successful in the pursuit of their education range from difficulties of getting to school, to paying tutoring for additional support to pass test’s to well as the actual cost of the schooling necessary. Even when the tuition of the education these children in underdeveloped countries

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    are relatively poor are absolutely poor, but, all people who are absolutely poor are relatively poor. These types of poor are found all throughout the world especially in underdeveloped countries. In the United States a advanced well-developed country both absolute and relative poverty are present throughout the country. I think that absolute poverty has no beneficial purposes to society. However, relative poverty does have beneficial functions. I think that relative poverty can make people

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    Colonialism and Dependence

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    sharper. Historical research has shown that the distance that separated the standard of living in the wealthy countries from that of the poor countries toward the middle of the nineteenth century was much smaller than the distance that separates them today. The gap has widened. In 1850 the per capita income in the industrialized countries was 50 per cent higher than in the underdeveloped countries. To have an idea of the progress that has been achieved in the DEVELOPMENT OF INEQUALITY, we have only to

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    Role of English Language Education in Developmental Contexts The teaching of English in postcolonial, Third World countries is an issue that has received much debate in the TESOL profession. Opponents of the current global spread of English argue that this language dominance is a form of neo-colonialism and that its expansion should be halted, especially in postcolonial countries where English was previously a language of oppression. Phillipson (1992) goes so far as to term the spread of English

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