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    Introduction pg. 2 Historical background of the Ulster Museum pg. 2 Context pg. 4 Description of spaces pg. 5 The Potential step forward pg. 5 Conclusion pg. 6 Bibliography pg. 7 Books pg. 7 Journals pg. 7 Internet pg. 7 Introduction This museum has been in transition at pivotal points of its historical time line thus far. It begs the question though, does it work as an architectural

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    The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Cultra, Co. Down, Northern Ireland Monuments and museums are arenas of public history and for the formation and articulation of identities and narratives.[1] Decisions taken as to the formation of museums and the selection, display and organisation of exhibits are influenced by criteria which are not necessarily politically neutral; these may especially involve devices of political elites to emphasise aspects of communal togetherness and thus exert control

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    The Bedrock Geology

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    rock, which in Northern Ireland include sandstone, mudstone and limestone. The collections of the Ulster Museum contain fossils from all around the world, from tiny microfossils found in the lias in Ulster, to dinosaur skeletons found in North America. Many fossils in the Ulster Museum's collections are very scientifically important and have been studied by experts from around the world. The Ulster Museum holds particularly important collections of brachiopods, fish teeth and other fossils from the

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    in Drogheda. Were there was a mighty rebellion, which Oliver reacted in a very harsh and bloody way killing everyone. Before the British settled the country was one country all owned by Ireland with 26 counties, but when they came most went to Ulster the top half and made it British land. This split the country into two, which as you can imagine the Irish, didn't like and they have tried to rebel ever since. In 1969 the army under control of king James tried to take the town of Derry, when

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    politics as their loyalty was with Rome and with their Head of Church, the Pope. He thought therefore that they could never be loyal to the government of Ulster; he therefore labelled them as ‘traitors’. Gerrymandering was done to stop these so-called traitors from entering local councils where they would probably betray the people of Ulster. It was also believed that if Catholics had a greater voice in politics they would make their own laws similar to those in the Republic. This had happened

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    The Preservation of a Culture: The Gaelic League Imagine what if much of today’s freedoms that we take for granted were never even there to begin with? In Ireland this is what most of the people were realizing when the Government was starting to take control. The Government was getting irritated and wanted to get rid of all Ireland’s language and culture. During the 1800’s Ireland was a thriving culture with much going on. Ireland had many things coming to an end and also starting a new beginning

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    Ireland: The Invention of Tradition

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    linked to Gaul and Britain so the analogy between them and the invading English was complete. The Ulster Cycle, (an Rúraíocht), is concerned with heroic battles by great Irish warriors. The statue put up in the General Post Office in Sackville Street, Dublin, (now O’Connell Street) to remember the fallen of the 1916 Rising was inspired by these tales. It shows the hero Cuchulainn, the Hound of Ulster, who tied himself to a tree so that he would die on his feet. Even more importantly, as he died

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    Conflict in the Emerald Isle

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    Conflict in the Emerald Isle The island of Ireland is known for many things: St. Patrick’s Day, its green landscape, music, beer, and discord. The heart of this conflict began centuries ago, when Britain came over and forced Protestantism on the Irish Catholic inhabitants. There has always been hatred between the Irish Protestants and Catholics. The island is broken up into to distinct regions. The Republic of Ireland consists of 26 counties, which make up the southern region. This area

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    The Flight of the Earls

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    Nine Years War. Sir John Davis, the Solicitor general had drafted a proclamation in March 1605, which denied any standing to Gaelic customary systems of tenure. He had obtained instructions from James I in order to minimise the danger of the earls of ulster becoming too powerful. Tyrone and O’Donnell’s lands were to be divided into freeholds held directly from the crown by their inhabitants to limit the power that they have over their followers. Tyrone anticipated this and divided his lordship into

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    rebellion; not only on its nature, but also with regards the plantations and interaction of settlers, and the social, cultural, political and economic landscape of the era. While it was customary to think that the rebellion of 1641 was a reaction to the Ulster Plantation, or ‘a straightforward tale of conflict between protestant and catholic’, wider research has now proved these explanations to be oversimplified. There are also varying views on the involvement of the Lords and gentry of the Pale in the

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