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    Treatise on the Lord’s Supper All of the gospels contain references to the Lord’s Supper, along with Acts and 1 Corinthians, Genesis, and also Daniel. Matthew 26:26-30, Mark 14:22-24, and Luke 22:17-23 all talk about the Last Supper with Jesus’ disciples, and all contain the saying, “Take eat, this is My body.” Acts 2:42 and 46 both talk about breaking of the bread and eating it with joy. I Corinthians 23-26 also talks about the Last Supper, and the bread and wine representing Jesus’ sacrifice

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    In this essay Martin Luther comments upon the role of good works in a Christian's life and the overall goal of a Christian in his or her walk. He writes seventeen different sections answering the critics of his teachings. I will summarize and address each one of these sections in the following essay. In the first and second section, Martin Luther exclaims that if you want to know what good works to do, know the commandments and follow them accordingly. He also says not to judge works by their

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    Hobbes' Leviathan and Locke's Second Treatise of Government Hobbes’ Leviathan and Locke’s Second Treatise of Government comprise critical works in the lexicon of political science theory. Both works expound on the origins and purpose of civil society and government. Hobbes’ and Locke’s writings center on the definition of the “state of nature” and the best means by which a society develops a systemic format from this beginning. The authors hold opposing views as to how man fits into the state

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    Milton's Treatise for the Christian Soldier in Paradise Lost While the War in Heaven, presented in Book VI of John Milton's Paradise Lost, operates as a refutation of the concept of glory associated with the epic tradition, the episode also serves a major theological purpose. It provides nothing less than a perfect example of how the Christian soldier should act obediently in combating evil, guarding against temptation, and remaining ever vigilant against the forces of darkness. It also offers

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    Observations on Property in Robinson Crusoe and Second Treatise People have been fighting over land and possessions since Adam and Eve left the Garden of Eden. But what actually constitutes the ownership of property? In the eighteenth century John Locke and Daniel Defoe addressed this question. In his Second Treatise, Locke defends the rights of people to property and he explains the basis for obtaining and maintaining dominion over it. In Robinson Crusoe, Defoe suggests a definition of property

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    A Constitutional Framework: The Relationship of Supreme Power and Individual Rights in the Second Treatise The supremacy of legislative power is a deceptive phrase in the Second Treatise. If one were to follow Locke’s blueprint for the original formation of the commonwealth closely, it would become apparent that supreme power in political society rests with the people, not the legislature, because ultimately, there must be a constitution that is written by the people. In order to most clearly

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    Moral Economy in Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and Locke’s Second Treatise of Government James Joyce on Robinson Crusoe: “…the man alone, on a desert island, constructing a simple and moral economy which becomes the basis of a commonwealth presided over by a benevolent sovereign” (Liu 731). Issues of property and ownership were important during the 18th century both to scholars and the common man. The case of America demonstrates that politicians, such as Thomas Jefferson, were highly influenced

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    Review this essay John Locke – Second treatise, of civil government 1. First of all, John Locke reminds the reader from where the right of political power comes from. He expands the idea by saying, “we must consider what estate all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit.” Locke believes in equality among all people. Since every creature on earth was created by God, no one has advantages

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    Locke's The Second Treatise of Civil Government: The Significance of Reason The significance of reason is discussed both in John Locke's, The Second Treatise of Civil Government, and in Jean-Jacques Rousseau's, Emile. However, the definitions that both authors give to the word “reason” vary significantly. I will now attempt to compare the different meanings that each man considered to be the accurate definition of reason. John Locke believed that the state “all men are naturally in ... is a state

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    Comparing Morality in The Prince, Second Treatise of Government, and Utilitarianism Niccolo Machiavelli, John Locke, and John Stuart Mill present three distinct models of government in their works The Prince, Second Treatise of Government, and Utilitarianism. From an examination of these models it is possible to infer their views about human nature and its connection to the purpose of government. A key to comparing these views can be found in an examination of their ideas of morality as an intermediary

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    Locke's Second Treatise of Government, by far, is his most influential and important piece of writing. In it he set forth his theory of natural law and natural right. He shows that there does exist a rational purpose to government, and one need not rely on "mysticism and mystery." Against anarchy, Locke saw his job as one who must defend government as an institution. Locke's object was to insist not only that the public welfare was the test of good government and the basis for properly imposing obligations

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    Property in Second Treatise of Civil Government and Robinson Crusoe Both John Locke's Second Treatise of Civil Government and Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe deal with the question of property. In these two texts, the following questions arise: when does common property become an individual's property; and what factors make the appropriation of property justifiable or not? These questions may be answered by looking at each author's political views, followed by how they are incorporated in their

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    “And thus came in the use of Money, some lasting thing that Men might keep without spoiling, and that by mutual consent Men would take in exchange for the truly useful, but perishable Supports of Life.” (Chapter V: 47). In Chapter V of his Second Treatise, John Locke defines the legitimate appropriation of property as a process dependent on the use of personal labor by individuals. He explains that God has given the World to all of mankind so that they might use its resources to their advantages.

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    John Locke’s Views on Property and Liberty, as Outlined in His Second Treatise of Government John Locke’s views on property and liberty, as outlined in his Second Treatise of Government (1690), have had varying interpretations and treatments by subsequent generations of authors. At one extreme, Locke has been claimed as one of the early originators of Western liberalism, who had sought to lay the foundations for civil government, based on universal consent and the natural rights of individuals

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    In the first section of “Government” political theorist James Mill attempts to answer the question regarding the existence of the institution of government, as he believes that despite the abundance of literature regarding this topic, only few principles are well-established. Mill states that the reason for this is incorrect analysis, and existence of only a generalised conception, leading to endless disputes especially when deliberated upon. Mill begins by stating that government is primarily a

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    In the beginning of the Second Treatise of Government, John Locke showed his protest against Filmer's theory about the omnipotent power of government over human beings. He assured that political power must derive from the divine state of human beings. That is the State of Nature which includes the state of perfect freedom and the state of perfect equality. In other words, he argued that all men are by nature created equal; however, John Locke didn't reject the reality that inequalities of wealth

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    approach to each other is as old as humankind, and, though it has never been able to be proved a proper science, in everyday life we all believe in and use physioculture. The earliest extant written work on the subject is the pseudo-Aristotelian treatise Physiognomonica. The author of its first part, in discussing the methodology of the art, refers to Aristotle, who develops the logical foundation of physiognomical inference: as an enthymeme, a syllogism from signs. Yet, concentrating solely on the

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    David Hume’s Two Definitions of Cause

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    both A Treatise of Human Nature, and An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding have been the center of much controversy in regards to his actual view of causation. Much of the debate centers on the lack of consistency between the two definitions and also with the definitions as a part of the greater text. As for the latter objection, much of the inconsistency can be remedied by sticking to the account presented in the Enquiry, as Hume makes explicit in the Author’s Advertisement that the Treatise was

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    Archimedes

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    We know he was born in 287 B.C. around Syracuse from a report about 1400 years after the fact. Archimedes tells about his father, Pheidias, in his book The Sandreckoner. Pheidias was an astronomer, who was famous for being the author of a treatise on the diameters of the sun and the moon. Historians speculate that Pheidias^ profession explains why Archimedes chose his career. Some scholars have characterized Archimedes as an aristocrat who actively participated in the Syracusan court

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    been plunged into the depths of uncertainty. The cosmological, geographical, and religious revolutions called into question the nature of truth itself. It is no wonder, then, that some of the great writers at the time included within their works a treatise on the ways in which truth is constructed. Because of the major ideological revolutions that shaped their world, Montaigne and other authors all used characters and theatrical devices to create their own ideas on the construction of truth. Montaigne

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