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    Jean Toomer

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    Governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction. The Pinchback's retired north and settled in the Negro community of the capitol. Thus, Toomer was born, as Nathan Pinchback Toomer into an upper class Negro family in Washington D.C. on December 26, 1894. Shortly after Toomer's birth, his caucasion father deserted his wife and son, and in 1996 Toomer's mother, Nina Toomer, gave him the name Nathan Eugene (which he later shortened to Jean). At the age of ten he was stricken with severe stomach ailments

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    Claude McKay was born on September 15th 1890, in the West Indian island of Jamaica. He was the youngest of eleven children. At the age of ten, he wrote a rhyme of acrostic for an elementary-school gala. He then changed his style and mixed West Indian folk songs with church hymns. At the age of seventeen he met a gentlemen named Walter Jekyll, who encouraged him to write in his native dialect. Jekyll introduced him to a new world of literature. McKay soon left Jamaica and would never return to his

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    Jean Toomer- An African American Writer

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    Jean Toomer was an African American writer. He was known as the leading American writer of the 1920s after he established his book "Cane" which inspired authors of the Harlem Renaissance. Jean Toomer was born on December 26, 1894 as Nathan Pinchback Toomer. His mother was the governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction and the first U.S. governor of African American descent (Jones 1). In 1985, Toomer's father abandoned him and his mother. He forced them to live with his mother cruel father in Washington

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    Like many average White American, Toomer was not recognized by the African American people and had no intentions to taking him or his book seriously because of his preference of being white. Toomer, like other poets and playwrights, has been very successful in describing significant events through his use of vocabulary and vision. Toomer uses different literary devices to give a visual and emotional feeling of the reaper and his hunger

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    why don't that doctor come on here?" Rannie keeps on hoping, and not allowing Sarah, the witch doctor to help her. Rannie believes that Sarah help will be evil, and that the white doctor will soon come. 'We going to have us a doctor,' Rannie Toomer said fiercly, walking over to shoo a fat winter fly from her child's forehead. 'I don't belive in none of that swamp magic.' Rannie is unaware of who she is and how others view her. She does not realize that the color of her skin is oppressing

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    Toomer's Seventh Street, Depicts Life and Issues in the Prohibition Period Toomer captures very deep thoughts in his writing in fairly simple language. The way he works his ideas into the text is amazing. In "Seventh Street," an excerpt from his larger work, Cane, Toomer blends ethnic ideas together while speaking about issues that involve the whole public spectrum. He begins with a four-line verse that draws the reader in and helps him to visualize the setting. Money burns the pocket

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    Comparing the Blues and Jean Toomer's Cane

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    in my Bowl," "Gimme a Pigfoot and a Bottle of Beer, "when placed next to a work of such literary boldness as Cane; a work that William Braithwhite gushingly refers to as "a book of gold and bronze, of dusk and flame, of ecstasy and pain, and Jean Toomer is a bright morning star of a new day of the race in literature" (Baker 16). A closer examination of both forms reveal startling similarities in theme, structure and content and that most important attribute - spirit.

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    Ohio, an earlier work from the modernist canon. A close reading of Cane’s structure and thematic content suggests that the importance of sophistication and companionship found in Winesburg, Ohio epitomize the aspirations of modern maturity that Toomer recognized. Though Cane’s diverse characters aspire to find love and the sophisticated, complex truth of life, it is the misunderstanding of these ideas that connects the stories. In what may be the most obvious formulaic consistency in the collection

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    Use of Imagery in Jean Toomer's Cane

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    dreamlike derivatives form the connective imagery joining light and dark, day and night, black and white. It is the kind of imagery that most closely articulates what George Hutchinson called Toomer's dream of a new "American" race in his essay "Jean Toomer and American Racial Discourse" (227). He says, "Toomer's vision of a coming merging of the races makes perfect sense within the framework of the first section of Cane: the dystopia of the contemporary South implies a corresponding utopia" (234).

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    An Analysis of Jean Toomer's Cane In the prose fiction Cane: Jean Toomer uses the background of the Black American in the South to assist in establishing the role of the modernist black writer.  While stylistic characteristics such as ambiguity of words and the irony of the contradictory sentences clearly mask this novel as a modernist work.   Toomer draws upon his experiences and his perspective of the life of Blacks in Georgia to create a setting capable of demonstrating the difficulties

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