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Free Tokugawa Essays and Papers

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    Tokugawa Japan

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    Midterm Question—1 Tokugawa Ieyasu was a great samurai fighter and cunning politician. In battle of Sekigahara Tokugawa defeated his major rivals and established Tokugawa government. His headquarter was established in village of Edo away from the imperial families in Kyoto. Ieyasu and successors choose to rule as shoguns, or feudal lords, demanding loyalty from the daimyo and exercising direct control only over their own territorial domains. The people saw the emperor as divine descent of sun goddess

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    The Tokugawa Dynasty

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    The governing body in Japan, during the nineteenth century, went from leadership under the Tokugawa dynasty to leadership under the leaders of the Meiji restoration. This shift of power caused the end of Feudal Japan and the beginning of modernized Japan. The Tokugawa dynasty fell because of foreign encroachment, Tokugawa political and economic instability, and the role changes and actions of Japan's daimyo and samurais. These stresses proved that, a state of affairs was likely to bring about the

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    The Tokugawa Restoration

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    signaled the end for the Tokugawa bakufu, who had for the last two centuries mostly avoided all contact with the West (Gordon, 2009, 18-20). A year later Perry would return, and force open the once closed off Japan (Gordon, 2009, 50). Less than fifteen years later, the Tokugawa shogunate, which had persisted through an unprecedented era of stability in Japan’s history, would no longer exist (Gordon, 2009, 11, 61). The events that culminated in the overthrow of the Tokugawa regime are most commonly

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    Tokugawa Government

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    Tokugawa government had belonged to the Shoguns and was successful in forming and keeping an affordable system that had lasted two and a half centuries (Pg.3). Tokugawa government’s goal was to maintain “under the centralized power in the context of a feudal system, in which the various lords (daimyo) could retain their autonomy (Pg.3).” Tokugawa Shogun had his castle in Edo and he had also established the Shogun government in Edo and it is now presently known as Tokyo. The Edo government of the

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    The Tokugawa Administration

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    The Tokugawa dynasty ruled Japan from the period 1600-1868 that was known as the Tokugawa or Edo period, as Edo was the Capital city at this time (O’Neill,115).This clan came to power via Iyasu’s victory in the battle of Sekigahara in 1600 over the forces loyal to the house of Toyotomi (Gordon, 11). This was the last warrior clan to rule Japan, ending with the restoration of Imperial power in 1868 (O’Neill, 115). The warriors of this clan were known as samurai, a Japanese word meaning “one who serves”

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    Japan Tokugawa Period

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    breakdowns in this book that tells the story of the different periods in Japan too. Tokugawa Era was considered a critical period in Japan’s history as it helped Japan evolved to pre-war period and Japan’s 21st century. The main highlight of the book was in regards to Tokugawa Era as the author mainly focused on this critical period and there was elaborate research on this topic. Tokugawa Era was brought about by Tokugawa Ieyasu who was a military dictatorship and he helped achieve hegemony and stability

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    The Tokugawa Era in Japan

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    The Tokugawa Era in Japan, also known as the Edo Period, took place after the Era of Warring States, which in Japanese is called the Sengoku Jidai. Events that occurred during this era were essential to the start of the Tokugawa Shogunate¹. The Sengoku Jidai started in the 1500s with the Ashikaga Shogunate, when General Ashikaga Takauji crushed a samurai rebellion. The current emperor at the time, Go-Daigo, "—a man of 30 determined to put an end to cloister rule..." (Swann 147) refused to make him

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    The Influence of Japan's Tokugawa Family

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    In 1868, after more than two centuries of self-imposed isolation, Japan finally begun to emerge into the modern world. The beginning of the 16th century saw the Tokugawa family awarded military control of Japan, and the introduction of an isolation policy on their behalf. During this period, starting in the 1630s and ending with the arrival of Matthew Perry in 1853, Japan had extremely limited contact with the outside world. Japanese culture and Japan’s internal economy continued to develop, however

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    This essay will be about the samurai class in the Tokugawa era and all the events leading to their fall. It will also talk about how they did not technically ‘fall,’ but were in fact replaced by the commoner class in Japan. This commoner class brought on an economy centred around money rather than land, making the Samurai class bow down to the commoner class, since the Samurai were already in poverty at this point, however, they were still supported by what the commoner class had to offer so there

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    What Accounts for the Stability of the Tokugawa Regime? In the first half of the Seventeenth century, the regime perfected by Ieyasu Tokugawa and his successors was based on the accepted system of daimyô domains which Nobunaga and Hideyoshi had been developing prior to Ieyasu’s rule. It was thus basically feudal in structure, but it represented a highly organised and stable stage of feudalism, unlike Europe ever experienced. The reasons for the stability of such a regime are quite numerous, and

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