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    our own lives as we vicariously experience the lives of other people through the reading experience. After reading these three novels, there are many things I have learned from them and I can strongly relate to many aspects of these novels using my personal life. Many things that happen throughout the life of a person can ironically be the exact same thing that is in a novel. Many times the answers to the problems of the person can be shown in the story or through the characters. To me, John Steinbeck’s

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    spent much of my free time this semester reading and analyzing three novels for my English class. One book in my opinion stands out among the others. The three books had some similarities between them, but the books also had quite a few differences. Through those similarities and differences I have concluded that Hatchet is by far my favorite. It was also the easiest to follow and in a weird way relate to. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen is a novel about a young boy’s survival. According to randomhouse.com Gary

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    Two novels written before the nineteenth century were, Pride and Prejudice and The Three Musketeers. In the first novel, Pride and Prejudice written by Jane Austen, there is the Bennet family. They have five daughters and Mrs.Bennet is very eager to get them all married. At coincidental timing Mr.Bingley, a wealthy single man comes to Netherfield. After a social visit by Mr.Bennet to Mr.Bingley, the Bennets are invited to a ball. At the ball Jane immediately catches the attention of Mr.Bingley and

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    boundaries of human interference in nature are expanding indefinitely. Everywhere, there is a sense of the unconquerable forces unwittingly evoked to serve the project of progress, bringing the project itself into question. This idea has produced three novels that suggest the improvidence of man's quest for authority from natural law; they are: Frankenstein, by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, H.G. Well's The Time Machine, and Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley. The purpose of progress is to attain greater

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    Jazz and Three Novels

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    In an essay on Heinrich Heine in his Selected Prose Works written in 1860, Matthew Arnold penned: “Modern man finds himself with an immense system of institutions, established facts, accredited dogmas, customs, and rules which have come down to him from times not modern. Though his life must move forward, he has a sense that this system is not of his own creation, and that it by no means corresponds exactly to the wants of his actual life. Life has become customary, not rational. The awakening of

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    and The Sun Also Rises we see the plights of this generation played out in a very serious way that leaves the reader with a heavy feeling of discomfort with the illogical and empty way the characters attempt to subsist.  Both authors and all three novels point to one conclusion, that if your goal is to live without suffering consequences of your actions you will in fact not live but suffer in an unfulfilling existence. Throughout the tale of The Great Gatsby the reader is treated to a vivid

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    and Dune Ursuala K. LeGuin's The Left Hand of Darkness was written after J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and Frank Herbert's Dune. One of the most interesting comparisons between the three novels is how the authors treat the issue of cross-cultural misunderstandings. All three works contain many incidents where people of one race or planet encounter people of a different race or from a different planet. Tolkien treats this issue in a 'specisitc' or physiological manner. The

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    been stifled by culture and history and she is left wondering who and what she is. Shelley, Brontë, and Eliot each deal with the complexity of female identity in their respective texts: Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, and The Mill on the Floss. All three novels parallel in respect to the image of mirrors, and the obvious implications of mirrors and their ability to reflect their observer. In Frankenstein, the monster looks into a pool and in relating the incident to Victor, says "when I became fully convinced

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    Abstract—This paper describes design considerations and performance analysis of a novel on-line single-phase to three-phase uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with reduced number of switches. The proposed topology uses only 5 active switches reducing the cost of the system compared to the traditional 10-switch topologies. The proposed UPS consists of a single-phase rectifier/charger, a two-leg/three-phase inverter connected to load, battery bank, DC link capacitor and an AC inductor. Detailed circuit

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    For instance, situations of despair may cause feelings of depression and uncertainty to develop in an individual, as would likely be expected. However, those same situations could ultimately lead to a sense of fulfilment or enlightenment. In the novels All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Remarque, The Wars by Timothy Findley, and A Farewell To Arms by Ernest Hemmingway, the varying possibilities of the effects of war on an individual are clearly displayed. In All Quiet On The Western Front,

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    destiny as a fictive device, which serves to propel the three following books: Cat's Cradle, Mother Night, and Jailbird. Kurt Vonnegut is a master of fictive devices because he uses them to construct an intricate web of possibilities for his stories to proceed on. Destiny, as the dictionary tells us, is "a predetermined course of events often held to be a resistless power or agency," and in these three novels, Kurt Vonnegut implies that destiny is just the way things

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    Intelligent White Trash in the Snopes Trilogy William Faulkner's three novels referred to as the Snopes Trilogy submerge the reader into the deepest, darkest realms of the human mind. The depth of these novels caused the immediate dismissal of any preconceived notions I had toward Faulkner and his writings. No longer did his novels seem to be simple stories describing the white trash, living in the artificial Yoknapatawpha County, of the deep South. The seemingly redneck, simple-minded characters

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    Comparing Maturation in Sons and Lovers by D.H Lawrence, Out Of The Shelter by David Lodge and The Rachel Papers by Martin Amis Each of these three novels Sons and Lovers by D.H Lawrence, Out Of The Shelter by David Lodge and The Rachel Papers by Martin Amis, examine the transition between childhood and adulthood of the three main characters in each of the texts. Each author represents this transition by showing how all the characters deal with significant stages or events in their lives. The

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    what is an ideal society? Many people have very diversified views about a perfect civilization. In Plato's Republic, Sir Thomas More's Utopia, and James Gurney's Dinotopia, three imaginary societies are described, each with its own peculiarities and highlights. Various aspects of the nations described in these three novels, including their respective economies, governments, and social structures, will be compared and contrasted. A crucial aspect of any society would be its economy. In Utopia

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    Why are books so important? Some may say their educational other’s may say for there entertainment. Well I personally believe that books are important because their our guides/sages that will help us determine our path in life. Books represent knowledge, and imagination, and feelings and hopes and fears of the people who write them. Even if they are badly written, you can still learn from books. Some of the books that I remember that that affected me were Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, Mythology

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    to be in an uneasy state and have flashbacks of bad memories, and it caused Ung to adapt to a new lifestyle. Childhood wartime experiences have had a negative impact on Wiesel's life. The war caused Wiesel to lose faith in God. For example, in the novel, he states, “Why, but why should I bless him? In every fiber, I rebelled. Because he had thousands of children burnt in his fire because he kept six crematories working day and night, on Sundays, and on fast days” (Wiesel 67). Even though the Jews

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    and a worker). This essay begins by introducing the theme of 'ambiguous heroism' that runs through each of the three novels, by scrutinising the example of The Robber Bridegroom. Following this, by looking in detail at the similarities (and differences) that are evident in terms of the characters' moral stances, physical bravery, and world view, it shall be demonstrated that all three characters are candidates for ambiguous heroism. The simplest example of ambiguous heroism is offered in Welty's

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    Literary Allusion in Women of Brewster Place, Linden Hills, and Mama Day Gloria Naylor has endeavored to overcome the obstacles that accompany being an African-American woman writer.  In her first three novels, The Women of Brewster Place, Linden Hills, and Mama Day, Naylor succeeds not only in blurring the boundary between ethnic writing and classical writing, but she makes it her goal to incorporate the lives of African-Americans into an art form with universal appeal.  Gloria Naylor explains

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    Baldwin’s first three novels -Go Tell It on the Mountain, Giovanni's Room, and Another Country-boil over with anger, prejudice, and hatred, yet the primary force his characters must contend with is love.  Not meek or mawkish but "...something active, more like fire, like the wind" (qtd. in O'Neale 126), Baldwin's notion of love can conquer the horrors of society and pave the way to "emotional security" (Kinnamon 5).  His recipe calls for a determined identity, a confrontation with and acceptance

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    All of the authors, however, recognize the “wild vitality” (Conrad) within the natural populace, and Conrad specifically goes so far as to declare that they are as “true as the surf along the coast” (Conrad). The “civilized” white men in all three novels feel it is their position to go to Africa and “fix” them—the very “thought of their humanity” (Conrad) is what causes the white man to label them as adversaries while the writers identify them as vibrant and whole. People as a whole stereotype

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