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    Thomas Young

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    Thomas Young (1773-1829) Thomas Young was a brilliant man throughout his life. At a young age of fourteen, he was familiar with Latin, Greek, French, Italian, Hebrew, Arabic, and Persian. He was so educated in a variety of areas that his peers called him Phenomena Young. This Englishman found interest in languages, medicine, nature, and light. He did his studies in London, Edinburgh, and Göttingen, and practiced medicine in London. With his strong interest in sense perception, he was able to

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    Thomas Young

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    Thomas Young Thomas Young, English physician and physicist, was born on June 13, 1773, in Milverton, Somerset; and died May 10, 1829, in London. Young was the son of a banker, who at the tender age of two learned how to read. He attended boarding schools between 1780 and 1786, where he became fluent in several different languages. Young was also greatly knowledgeable in the fields of mathematics and natural sciences, and in 1793 he entered St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London to study medicine,

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    eyes. It wasn’t until 1803 when the English scientist, Thomas Young, first challenged this theory. Instead, Young believed that light was a wave phenomenon just like sound. He developed a new experiment, now referred to as Young’s Double-Slit Experiment, to test his hypothesis. The results of Young’s experiment were extremely important, proving that light has both wave and particle characteristics, called wave-particle duality. Thomas Young knew that sound was a wave which resembled a ripple of water

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    on Earth would not exist. It is the most essential component in all of the universe and it is very complex. In 1799, Thomas Young began to study sight and the behavior of light, otherwise known as optics. During his time, Young made many scientific advancements in the field of optics that have impacted the world we know today. This report will be discussing the topic of Thomas Young's Double-Slit Experiment. Take note of the diagrams as presented in paragraphs one and three. The main ideas of

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    that light was made up of waves. During Thomas Young’s time, it was very difficult to describe the behavior of light. The predominant theory was that light was made up of particles. However, in his experiment, Young was able to observe the interaction of light waves when passed through two slits, showing the wave-like nature of light. This report will cover the reasons for Young’s experiment, the experiment itself, and its implications. The question Thomas Young sought to resolve was whether light was

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    Since the dawn of man, light has been a point of interest. For centuries man has studied light and its effects in the world, and for a long time we were oblivious to how it truly worked; but thanks to a young scientist, name Thomas Young, we learned how it worked in the early nineteenth century. Light, as it turned out to be, is a wave particle rippling through the universe. The purpose of this essay is to explain Young’s findings and the experiment he used to learn how light worked. During the centuries

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    Light Experiment

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    In 1801 a man by the name of Thomas Young made a striking discovery on the behavior of light. Young devised an experiment that determined the characteristics of light. In this experiment, a coherent light source illuminates a plate, pierced by two parallel slits, and the light passing through the slits is observed on a screen behind the plate. It was thought that with two slits cut into the plate would cause it to illuminate two slits on the observing plate behind. Because at that time it was thought

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    experiment, light was widely accepted as being comprised particles, not waves. This theory was made popular by Sir Isaac Newton, and accepted as true until Young proved him wrong in 1801. Young sought out to prove that light was made of waves, not particles; but his findings opened up a whole new spectrum that scientist never foresaw. In 801, Thomas Young conducted his experiment to prove that light was indeed made of waves. To do so, he had to find a coherent light source. At the time, the only artificial

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    The Rosetta Stone

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    the first demotic symbols. He identified a few of the proper names in the demotic text, after comparing them with the same names found in the Greek text. (Ogg 78) Next on the scene was Thomas Young, an English physicist, who took an interest to the deciphering the Rosetta Stone as well. After much researching, Young was able to prove that the proper names in the hieroglyphics section of the stone did in fact have phonetic value, and were not made up of symbols. He then introduced the idea of the proper

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    The Nature of Light

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    seen that the ability continues to be sought by scientists today. To try and achieve this researchers are looking at and deepening their understanding of the nature of light. The modern research carried out are elaborations of the work done by Thomas Young and Francesco Grimaldi who’s work formed the foundations of our current understanding of the nature of light. Figure 2 (Science Blogs, 2013) Backround Research Waves and Interference Wave motion is said to be the most common type of motion; it’s

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    In Thomas Young’s Double Slit Experiment, Young wished to prove that light was not, in fact, made from particles, but instead waves. Isaac Newton was the original scientist to declare that light was made up of particles. This theory of particles was eventually thrown out because it could not explain the results of Young’s experiment. Later, the two brilliant scientists’ theories would be combined to explain the concept of wave particle duality. To help explain the steps of this experiment, this

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    community. Nearly a century later, Thomas Young, an English physician and physicist, was intrigued by light’s dilation after it had passed through a thin slit. He then set out to discover the mysterious properties behind light. While Newton’s observations were sufficient enough for a macroscopic environment, they did not correctly anticipate the results on a much smaller scale. Young challenged the standard particle theory in the early nineteenth century. Young understood that sound traveled in waves

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    disc. Thomas Young devised the double slit experiment to prove that light is a wave. Two coherent sources of light are obtained in his experiment by splitting one monochromatic light source throw the two slits. The images below illustrates how Thomas Young conducted this experiment ---------------------------------------------------------------------- We know that in order for interference to occur, the source of the light must be coherent; however the images show that Young used

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    The double slit interference and Davisson-Germer experiments. In 1801 Thomas Young provided some very strong evidence to support the wave nature of light, he placed a monochromatic light in front of a screen with two slits cut into it, and observed an interference pattern, only possible if light was a wave. In 1965 Richard Feynman came up with a thought-experiment that was similar to Young’s experiment. In Feynman’s double-slit experiment, a chosen material is fired at a wall which has two small

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    colour physics

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    Colour Physics 712 words 1.     Colour physics, dispersion of sunlight into colours of the spectrum. (Sir Isaac Newton 1676) Discuss and illustrate Newton’s experiments and beyond, from particle to wave theory. 2.     Research, identify and illustrate how the eye sees colour, reference to light emitted, transmitted and reflected. 1. Sir Isaac Newton, held the theory that light was made up of tiny particles. Around the same period, Christiaan Huygens, believed that light was made up of waves vibrating

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    Binary Reasoning

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    a wave. The ancient world believed light was an extremely light and small particle that moved at incredible speeds. More recently, physicists have conducted experiments that proved that light has wave-like properties. In the early 19th century, Thomas Young, a British scientist, conducted a famous experiment in which he proved that light would interfere and diffract. A broad discussion about the nature of light emerged in the scientific world. The theories that light reflected of a surface just like

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    Light Essay

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    debated on for many centuries. Some claimed it was a wave. Others claimed it was a particle. In the early nineteenth century, Isaac Newton proposed that light was made up of particles, but the answer was not agreed on until an experiment performed by Thomas Young. Young’s basic experiment consisted of a coherent light source such as a laser beam being shot through and illuminating a plate containing two parallel slits and being observed on a screen located behind the plate. What exactly were the results

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    The focus of this report is researching Young’s Double Slit Experiment. With research comes understanding and that understanding will be shown by explaining his experiment in detail differently than other authors decided to explain it. In other words, Young’s Double Slit Experiment will be restated in a different way. This report will also be focused on the reasons behind the results of the experiment. This report is also focused on learning and understanding modern physics and how it affects the

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    How Holography Works

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    To develop and understanding of how holograms work, one first needs a basic understanding of light and its wave-like properties. First, we will consider investigate the concepts of diffraction and an interference pattern. Consider, for a moment, a person threw a rock into a pond. At the point where the rock hit the water, waves would form and would move away from the source of the wave (the rock) in a spherical shape. This is what a wave looks like when the wave is being emitted from a single

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    Tomorrowland” by Thomas Hine, he emphasizes the beliefs that adults began the idea of youth alienation from older societies and the teenagers keep it that way. Donna Gaine’s essay, “Teenage Wasteland,” discusses four teenagers who were mocked and misunderstood by adults and reporters alike. Jon Katz lets the kids explain themselves about their seclusion from society and the misconceptions about them in his column, “More from the Hellmouth: Kids Tell About Rage.” The fear that elders show towards young people

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