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    net/~dlarkins/slang-pg.htm Betty: Hello, everyone, and welcome to KDKA. Today we have the famous author This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the highly popular actress and nightclub host, Mary Louise Cecilia “Texas” Guinan. But first, let’s welcome Mr. Fitzgerald! It's swell having you on our program today. F. Scott: It’s a pleasure to be here, Betty. Betty: You wrote a breakout novel called This Side of Paradise, for those of you don’t know it investigates lives and the morality of post-World War

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    The Search for Identity in This Side of Paradise In F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel This Side of Paradise, Amory Blaine searches for his identity by "mirroring" people he admires.  However, these "mirrors" actually block him from finding his true self.  He falls in love with women whose personalities intrigue him; he mimics the actions of men he looks up to.  Eleanor Savage and Burne Holiday serve as prime examples of this.  Until Amory loses his pivotal "mirror," Monsignor Darcy, he searches for

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    This Side of Paradise and The Great Gatsby

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    characters of Fitzgerald’s writings. Although Fitzgerald’s protagonists are wealthy, there is a noticeable distinction between those who come from “old money” and those who are considered “new money”. Amory Blaine, of This Side of Paradise, and Jay Gatsby, of The Great Gatsby, exemplify this difference. Fitzgerald’s novels explore the opulent lifestyle of the upper class, and the resulting desire of outsiders to belong. Jay Gatsby is one such character who makes his way to the fringes of the upper

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    This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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    ” In This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald demonstrates the crisis of self-identification Amory Blaine faces up until his early twenties. Blaine’s struggle for self-identification parallels the challenges post-World War I American youth had to face, such as identifying the “right” group of people, establishing their own moral standards, and finding the perfect mate. The novel primarily takes place during World War I, in which the United States remains neutral for much of the war. This American

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    English 355 Character Analysis of Jay Gatsby and Amory Blaine from The Great Gatsby and This side of Paradise Fitzgerald’s character Jay Gatsby from his book The Great Gatsby, was very much in love with luxurious life .That is why in his early childhood he left St.Olaf’s College because he had to work as a janitor there to pay his tuition fees. It would not be wrong to say he hated poverty from his early life. This could be his main reason to feel attracted towards Daisy Buchanan, who was a symbol

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    are certain struggles in life that some are not sufficiently knowledgeable to overcome. A prevalent issue, F. Scott Fitzgerald was unwillingly forced into, during the twentieth century, was naiveness. This brought common misconceptions of what makes life worthwhile. The novel, This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, is influenced by his adolescent to adult years. Through the character of Amory Blaine, Fitzgerald portrays that naiveness and conceit can prevent life fulfillment. Amory Blaine

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    Jennifer R. Kinsey Professor Natascha Gast America Literature since the Civil War March 30, 2014 This Side of Paradise This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, I chose to write about the main character Amory Blaine. My goal is to show how unique and American Amory Blaine is from a very early age to adulthood. It will show how Amory Blaine can be compared to others in this century. Amory Blaine is the son of a man that is ineffectual, inarticulate of having a habit of drowsing over the Encyclopedia

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    Criticism by Imprisonment

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    Francis Scott Fitzgerald and Edith Wharton authored novels that take place in America around the beginning of the nineteenth century. In both This Side of Paradise and The House of Mirth, the authors paint the protagonists as imprisoned. This is a criticism of the society that they live in and is represented in the authors’ use of imagery, characterization, and the motif of social standing. Wharton uses a great deal of imagery to reflect Lily Bart as imprisoned, while Fitzgerald uses less imagery

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    Fitzgerald at Princeton

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    Fitzgerald at Princeton While he was a student at the Newman School, called St. Regis in This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald became enamored with Princeton. He attended the first Harvard-Princeton game since 1896 on November 4, 1911 and Princeton won 8-6 on a blocked kick that was returned for a touchdown (Tate, 199). His aunt offered to pay for his education at Georgetown, but Fitzgerald wanted to go to Princeton. When his grandmother died in 1913, she left money that made Princeton

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    and pointless wars in history plagued the world: World War I. This war destroyed a whole generation of young men, something one would refer to as the “Lost Generation”. Modernism was a time that allowed the barbarity of the war to simmer down and eventually, disappear altogether. One such author that thrived in this period was F. Scott Fitzgerald, a young poet and author who considered himself the best of his time. One could say that this self-absorption was what fueled his drive to be the most famous

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    Fitzgerald uses a lot of the same concepts and themes to have the same story line in these works. The Great Gatsby and This Side of Paradise are two examples of Fitzgerald’s use of similar characteristics. In Fitzgerald’s works, losing love to someone of a higher status is a recurring motif. In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby and Daisy are two lovers, brought apart by war. During this time Daisy marries a man named Tom, an extremely privileged young man, because of her need for love and falls in love with

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    Zelda Great Gatsby

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    rebellious future queen of the flappers Zelda if so then soar back into the roaring twenties and experience “The Great Gatsby.” Haven’t you ever read an interesting book and thought to yourself hmmm, how did this author Portray this amazing story. Was it based on his/her real life experience? or their ingenuity? The truth is everyone experiences

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    His first novel, 'This Side Of Paradise', was published in 1920, a time when the younger generations, who had fought in the first world war, turned to wild and extravagant living to overcome the shock of death. After this novel, Fitzgerald became a celebrity, and fell into a wild, reckless lifestyle of parties and decadence. Many of the events from this early stage of his life appear in "The Great Gatsby', which was published in 1925. It is the issues presented in this novel that illustrate

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    The Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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    In the book This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald, even though the main protagonist’s, Amory Blaine, character development is completely controlled by Fitzgerald's life, Amory goes through many changes through the story and they are born from the people Amory is around and Amory interactions with other characters are in relation to how Fitzgerald interacted and responded with others. Amory’s character seems to fluctuate throughout the novel, the more types of people he meets the more ideas

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    believed that this metaphor stems from his own troubles in finance during the creation of many works. (pardis 82) Another example of this themes was Josephine from “Josaphines stories”. It is shown through this work that “emotional bankruptcy” was inevitable for women of Fitzgerafitzgerald 'sld 's time, because they were treated as sexual objects. In the story, Josephine’s “emotional bankruptcy” is expressed that she is not only a consumer, but also an object of consumerism. This was very common

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    The Great Gatsby is just one of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s many published novels. In 1920 Fitzgerald published The Side of Paradise, he also published in 1922 The Beautiful and the Damned, which showed that Fitzgerald has many great life achievements, but The Great Gatsby was the finest even though it wasn’t until after Fitzgerald died that the novel really got it’s praise as one of the best novels written about the Roaring Twenties. It really portrays the views and the way of life back in the time frame

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    themselves. To him it seems as though this society is based on appearance and recognition and judges people according to how much they own rather than what they believe in. Nick's criticisms are accepted by the reader as impartial because Nick is the only major character who is not preoccupied with wealth. This is established in the first few pages of the novel where Nick describes himself and his upbringing in a manner that immediately secures the trust of the reader. This allows Nick to act as a measure

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    concerns. Ashes are light and easily blown about—a Sahara-like desert is expected, yet the dust storms Nick describes are rather tame, conjuring up very familiar human images (23); even those that Wilson sees are gentle and "fantastic." (160) Perhaps this doldrum-like state might emphasize the lack of change, but would still fail to account for the lack of effect rain has. Rain would wash away the ashes, or at least make a mess, but it fails to do so; the valley of ashes remains, neither blown nor washed

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    "one of the most powerful ends that ever played football" (Fitzgerald 10), as well as inherited wealth to give him the power and prestige to be perceived as better than the best. In the beginning of his college career, as Nick seems to suggest, it was this supreme physical ability on the football field that allowed Tom to have supreme reign over all off the field. But, after college, the football legacy ended, and with it, Tom'... ... middle of paper ... ...lected to "make a short deft movement [that]

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    Written during and regarding the 1920s, ‘The Great Gatsby’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald is both a representation of this distinctive social and historical context, and a construction of the composer’s experience of this era. Beliefs and practises of the present also play a crucial role in shaping the text, in particular changing the way in which literary techniques are interpreted. The present-day responder is powerfully influenced by their personal experiences, some of which essentially strengthen Fitzgerald’s

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