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    Theodicy

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    Malebranche and Leibniz slightly differ in their theodicy, or the theistic justification of evil. In this paper, I will discuss Malebranche’s and Leibniz’s solutions to the problem of evil, and argue that Leibniz’s explanation is more plausible based on his argument for the best possible world and its appeal to logical reasoning. Malebranche’s occasionalism, the doctrine that G-d is the sole cause of every effect, plays an important role in his theodicy. He argues that in order to understand the existence

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    be explained by the contrast theodicy that God may have reasons for evil to exist in society. An example of a contrast theodicy would be that bad things happen to good people and is the basis of the relationship of evil to God’s intent for the good of mankind. People also question why God does not eliminate the suffering of mankind from the world. Again, we can turn to a theodicy to provide an explanation to this question. The answer may found in the big-plan theodicy, which explains that suffering

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    Augustine and Boethius provide answers, although wordy and complex, to this problem of evil and exactly how humans are responsible in the midst of God's sovereignty and Providence. In Augustine's Confessions, the early church father puts forth a complex theodicy in which he declares evil to be nonexistent. Such a leap may seem to be illogical, but this idea stems from the understanding of what is substance and what is not. According to Augustine, the duality of good and evil is false, because anything

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    Soul Building Theodicy

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    people to hell all the time, therefore evil must exist. However, evil existing in actuality creates a problem to monotheistic religions. I will state what the problem of evil and what the soul-building theodicy is; additionally I will attempt to discuss another problem may arise due to this theodicy.

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    Theodicy Research Paper

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    Theodicy is the problem of evil in a world ruled by a sovereign and good God. That is, if an omnipotent God can prevent evil… why does He choose not to prevent evil. Especially since God hates and disapproves sin and corruption. For example, David writes in Psalm 5:4, “For you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil may not dwell with you.” However, many theologians believe that sin and punishment are willed and determined by God. Our text helped explain a few of these theories, and specifically

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    David Hume Anti Theodicy

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    Anti theodicy is the argument that it is wrong to seek theodicies, that is, it is wrong to seek answers to the problem of evil. Anti theodicy is prompted by the religious effects of theodicizing. Theodicizing has been accused of risking our faith in God by questioning Him, wasting time, reducing divine mystery in case we succeed in understanding the problem of evil, and increasing self-satisfaction when we realize that there are

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    not care, or He would notallow such things to happen. This is the basis of theodicy.What is theodicy? The term means giving explanations for God’s actions. God, who is apowerful and Supreme Being, allows innumerable acts of evil to take place. According to theEncyclopedia Britannica, if we look at theodicy and defense, only some evil can coexist with anomnipotent God. There are several views on what theodicy actually means. Christian theology isbased on two schools of thought, one based on the views

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    answers has always been the same, “No one knows for sure”. Theodicy juxtaposes evil and God’s ambivalent “all good, all knowing, and ever-present” condition in attempt to explain the reason why bad things happen to good people. Karma, in the other hand, simplifies the complexity of evil’s existence in the world by blaming ourselves for the bad things we have done not only in this, but also in other past lives. This paper will analyze how both theodicy and karma explain the existence of evil. My goal is

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    An Analysis of Peter van Inwagen’s The Magnitude, Duration, and Distribution of Evil: a Theodicy In his essay, "The Magnitude, Duration, and Distribution of Evil: a Theodicy," Peter van Inwagen alleges a set of reasons that God may have for allowing evil to exist on earth. Inwagen proposes the following story – throughout which there is an implicit assumption that God is all-good (perfectly benevolent, omnipotent, and omniscient) and deserving of all our love. God created humans in his own

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    Theodicy Problem

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    God, known also as “atheists”. An issue under discussion is the problem of evil or so-called theodicy problem in the world. The main idea of above-mentioned problem is that if God is perfectly good and all-knowing Creator then why there are so many troubles all over the world. This is the way why existence of God called into question. In my opinion, there is no doubtless reply while approach on theodicy problem depends on external factors. For instance, when someone is delighted he does not accept

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    Theodicy

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    Theodicy, when it is stripped down to its base, is the human response to the question of the reasons a good God would permit the manifestation of evil. From the 1700s to the early 19th century, literary works of art in the form of novels have attempted to provide an answer to the complexity. With the turn of each century authors produced new and different rationales and viable solutions to the problem of evil. Two authors in particular, Rousseau and Flaubert attempted to tackle this topic in their

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    Some theodicies prove to be objective and intelligent explanations for the problem of evil, and others are feeble justifications for the intense suffering seen in the natural world. John Hick, a theist philosopher discusses the idea that god has a reason for evil

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    Explain the Theodicy of Augustine (25 marks) The main purpose of a theodicy is to defend God, whilst explaining the existence of both natural and moral evil. Both Epicurus and Hume argued the unsatisfying logic behind there being an omnibenevolent God which allows evil to intervene in individuals lives on a daily basis. Epicurus outlines the trilemma of the problem of evil “is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? But then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? The he is not omnibenevolent

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    are not taking into account God’s nature. However, I maintain that Aquinas’s philosophy does not refute the problem of evil. To illustrate this I will raise three objections to Aquinas. First, I will show that although Aquinas is not attempting a theodicy, his arguments lead him into a position where one must defend how God can exist in a world with evil. Next, I will argue that moral agency is required for goodness. Then, I will contend that the problem of evil requires a moral justification. The

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    characteristics from a deity because the idea of an all powerful god and evil existing is nonsensical or by accepting evil and considering it as a trial or a test of loyalty from god that will eventually lead to a reward on Judgment Day. In Leibniz’s Theodicy, he doesn’t attempt to prove the existence of both evil and God’s omnipotence; so much as he tries to argue that is plausible and reasonable to believe in a god with the evident existence of evil. He does so by justifying (or attempts to) the evil

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    The Problem of Evil in Our World

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    are unable to understand how God being morally perfect can allow so many catastrophes around the world to happen all the time. Those questions raised in relation to God are described as issues with theodicy (Cunningham, and Kelsay 102). In a literal definition from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, theodicy i... ... middle of paper ... ... Prevention. N.p., 30 May 2013. Web. 30 Nov. 2013. "Boston Marathon Terror Attack Fast Facts." CNN. Cable News Network, 24 Oct. 2013. Web. 30 Nov. 2013. Cunningham

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    Hegel: Reason in History The second chapter of the Introduction to the Philosophy of History bears the title "Reason in History"; however, careful study reveals that it could just as aptly been dubbed Reason is History or better, History is Reason. Although Reason exists in a finite form within the human being, the whole—infinite Reason—is necessarily greater than the sum of its parts—the sum of finite Reasons. Hegel's Reason is the infinite material of all reality—the substance, form, and power

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    and He loves us and wants what is best for all His “children.” Curious creatures as we, humanity, are we tend to ask questions of why bad things happen to good people if He oversees and cares for us all. Theodicy Theodicy comes from the Greek word Theos meaning God and dikē meaning justice. Theodicy by translation

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    A theodicy is a response to the problem of evil by proving that God exists, that he is perfect, and that he lets evil exist. Leibniz does this by saying that “the best plan is not always that which seeks to avoid evil, since it may happen that the evil is

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    The Problem of Evil

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    were omnipotent, we would have the virtues without having to suffer. There is also no explanation of extreme suffering that occurs to the human race, for example the holocaust. The Theodicy does take into account the theory of evolution, however this is an inadequate response to the problem of evil. This Theodicy again is fairly successful in explaining the problem of evil because it does take into account evolution, and also the survival of the fittest, however, this response is inadequate

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