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    Theatre of the Absurd

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    Theatre of the Absurd Essay. The Theatre of the Absurd originated from experimental Arts of the avant-garde in the 1920’s and 30’s. It highlighted the meaning of life and came about as a result of the Second World War. It was also a result of absurd plays having a highly unusual, innovative form, aiming to startle the viewers. In the Second World War, in the meaningless and godless post Second World War world, it was no longer possible to keep using traditional art forms and standards

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    This influenced theatre in a big way, through a type of theatre called Avant-Garde (Franks). Avant-Garde was known to introduce original ideas, forms, and techniques. Often considered Experimental Theatre, it lacked logically-constructed plots and pushed the limits of the stage (Franks). It evolved into a form of theatre, known as the Theatre of the Absurd, which challenged the norm of the post-World War II society (Culik). Through unique methods, the Theatre of the Absurd made a major impact

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    existence is absurd and they used comedy in their plays such as ,Beckett's Waiting for Godot,(1953) (Drabble3). Beckett has tackled political themes in his plays such as, Catastrophe (1982), and What Where (1983) which deals with torture and totalitarian. Beckett's plays are not intellectually understood. Besides, irony was used in his works and his plays are closed compositions. The characters from the beginning until the end remain the same without development. In the Absurd Theatre the writers

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    The Portrayal of the Theatre of the Absurd Throughout literature, much has been assumed and gathered about the state of man and his purpose in life. Different poets, novelists, and playwrights have employed the powerful tools of language to broadcast their respective statement to the literate world. Many authors stand out for their overly romanticized or horribly pessimistic notations on life, but only Samuel Beckett stands out for his portrayal of absence. As Democritus, a Greek philosopher

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    Segundo Martin Esslin ‘’The Theatre of the Absurd strives to express its sense of the senselessness of the human condition and the inadequacy of the rational approach by the open abandonment of rational devices and discursive thought.’’. O Teatro do Absurdo foi um termo criado no pós-Segunda Guerra Mundial por Martin Esslin quando juntou num livro as peças de teatro de vários dramaturgos daquela época, entre os quais se encontravam Samuel Beckett, Eugène Ionesco, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, entre

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    are often questioned and it’s hard to find a way to explain what happens, but the theory of Existentialism and the practice of Absurd Theatre take a look at these ponderings. Existentialism is a philosophical idea that was focused on trying to find life’s purpose and while answering the questions about death and meaning to life that was explored by Tom Stoppard, in his absurd play, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. Existentialism is a philosophy centered on the analysis of why humans exist and

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    Esslin has written a large amount of information about Beckett and his works, including the genre known as The Theatre of the Absurd, in which most of Beckett’s works can be sorted into. Esslin coined the term “Theatre of the Absurd” in his book by the same name, and links The Theatre of the Absurd with Beckett’s works Waiting for Godot, and Endgame. Ultimately, The Theatre of the Absurd contains varied theatrical features that are seen in Beckett’s works, including the use of characters, language

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    Theatre of the Absurd and Samuel Beckett

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    human world. In retaliation to Ionesco’s criticism, Sartre criticized his ideas that he had put in his book ‘Rhinoceros’. According to Rosette C. Lamont, “Sartre’s criticism highlights a primary difference between the Theatre of the Absurd and Existentialism. The Theatre of the absurd shows the failure of man without recommending a solution” 10. Ionesco felt that Sartre and Camus thought out the themes which they did not express in a far more vital contemporary fashion. He said in an interview with

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    unusual than the Theatre of the Absurd. I have completed extensive research on this art form and am more than qualified to discuss the history of the aforementioned theatre style. During my research, I have found enticing information in regards to how this art form has evolved over the years, and how it still plays a role in modern society. However, if I may backtrack a little, I would like to start with how this theatre style originated. It is believed that the Theatre of the Absurd was a reaction

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    When the people in a small French town start to turn into rhinoceroses, something must be up. Well, this is exactly what happens in Eugene Ionesco’s Rhinoceros. The Theatre of the Absurd, as the title suggests, has some absurd topics. Rhinoceros is no exception. Absurdist plays were very popular in the years following World War II and many playwrights were influenced by the changing times, as seen in Eugene Ionesco’s Rhinoceros. As I mentioned before, this play was written shortly after World War

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    Stoppard's absurd comedy, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead is a transformation of the Shakespeare's revenge tragedy Hamlet. They both contain common characters and events but are separated by their historical, social and literary contexts. The plays are also different in language, theatrical style, values, character and themes. Shakespeare's Hamlet and Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead are different because of the different time periods. Shakespeare's Hamlet was written in the

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    horrors and disillusionment. The war which was glorified sooner brings forth total confusion and disorderly situation which none can avoid. This era therefore gives birth to a number of dramatists who constructs The Theatre of Absurd. Playwrights commonly associated with this Theatre generally include Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, Jean Genet, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, and Edward Albee. These dramatists express human existence without any meaning or purpose where every attempt for communication

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    the very word "Absurd" that it means nonsensical, opposed to reason, something silly, foolish, senseless, ridiculous and disorderly. Actually the 'Absurd Theatre' believes that humanity's plight is purposeless in an existence, which is out of harmony with its surroundings. "Waiting for Godot" is an absurd play for not only its plot is loose but its characters are also just mechanical puppets with their incoherent discussion. And above than all, its theme is unexplained. It is an absurd play for it

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    proving the progress of this philosophical movement. It will illustrate how existentialism has influenced Beckett, especially through his play, Waiting for Godot. The Theatre of the Absurd is another theatrical concept being examined proving that Samuel Beckett integrated the philosophy into his works through the Theatre of the Absurd. Whether or not Beckett justified existentialism or remodelled the theory, especially through the expression of “existence precedes essence”, will also be examined which

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    Harold Pinter and Samuel Beckett are two of the biggest exponents of The Theatre of the Absurd. Both of their works present a world which cannot be logically explained, where the scenery, the language and the actions of the characters are almost incomprehensible and do not comply with the previously accepted norms of theatre. J.L Styan writes about Pinter. "His audience is made to feel, through an exquisite friction of nightmare and normality, the earthly need for security" (The Dark Comedy)

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    written by Samuel Beckett and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead written by Tom Stoppard both incorporate human needs and concerns within their context through its whimsical and comedic dialogues. Both plays belong in the category of the theatre of the absurd, where the existentialist philosophy underlies all aspects of the plays. The central characters Rosencrantz and Guildenstern from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead share a deep friendship, this same friendship can also be seen within the

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    in composing the novel Theatre of the Absurd and quickly became a major influence on the works of many inspired writers. Esslin subsequently made ensuing plays and stories which focused on nonspecific existentialist concepts and which did not remain consistent with his ideas, rejecting the “narrative continuity and the rigidity of logic.” As a result, the protagonist of these stories is often not capable of containing himself within his or her disorderly society (“Theatre”). Writer Albert Camus

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    whether or not Vyrozumeni belongs to the Theatre of the Absurd it is important to know what this genre actually is. The playwrights who are associated with the Theatre of the Absurd did not form an organized movement, but nevertheless one can extrapolate specific criteria for absurdist drama. According to Martin Esslin these are: mechanistic actions, devaluation of language, circular structure, lack of solution for a problematic situation. The Theatre of the Absurd has been dealt with primarily as a

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    The theatre of the absurd encompasses a form of drama that emphasizes the absurdity of human existence by employing repetitious, meaningless dialogues and confusing situations, breaking the logical development, giving way to irrational and illogical speeches. A godless universe, human existence has no meaning or purpose and therefore all communication breaks down. The theatre of the absurd is sometimes defined it as a “working hypothesis”, a device, instead of a real movement. Martin Esslin in his

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    The Theater of the Absurd Religious declining is covered till the end of the World War II, and then it is replaced with developing nationalism and many kinds of dictatorial delusions, All this was broken by the war (Esslin, p. 23 ). At this moment, diverse orientations in attitude of human being on life determine new interpretation for definition of reality. For some people after Second World War, their doubts on condition of man are bigger, they think of reality and new orientations of life as

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