Free Theatre of ancient Greece Essays and Papers

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    Throughout the history of the theatre its technology has helped to convey the story, amaze the audience, and to, at times, make the theatrical performance possible. Over the ages we have seen the growth of theatre shown in its technology, namely its staging, costumes, scenery, and lighting. We will trace the development and growth of these technologies from Ancient Greece through the end of the eighteenth-century. The technology of the Ancient Greeks is, in fact, very amazing. One has no options

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    Ancient Greece, the birthplace of theatre, continues to greatly influence theatre today. Drama is a form of poetry, because dialogue was spoken or sung in verses. Many Greek plays are still relevant today. Some plays survived on their merits, while others were preserved from academic interest or by accident (Peter Arnott). The Great Dionysia was an important yearly religious celebration and festival, honoring Dionysus, the Greek god of wine and fertility. The Great Dionysia is where theatre first

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    Ancient Greece was a thriving Greek civilization that lasted from the archaic period to the end of the antiquity era. The ancient Greek culture was a technologically advanced civilization who laid the foundation for many of our modern day cultural traditions. One tradition that is still very prominent in our culture is theatre. The ancient Greek’s have been considered the pioneers of theatre, and are known to have introduced the first actor, the tragedy genre, and most impressively theatre architecture

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    Theater in Ancient Greece

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    Theatre in Ancient Greece Among the many inventions of the ancient Greeks, there have been a few that have specifically impacted modern day life for the better. Many of the things that are taken for granted today can be accredited to the intellectual minds of the people of ancient Greece. Our complicated plumbing and sewage systems that manage sanitation in most of the cities in the world have their roots in ancient society. The earliest concept of the crane was also developed during this time.

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    Drama In Antigone

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    been told over and over again throughout the years ever since the play by the same name was written during the Golden Age of Greece by a man named Sophocles. The Golden Age of Greece was possibly the height of ancient culture due to the creation of modern drama, a prime example of which is Antigone by Sophocles. The Golden Age of Greece lasted from 500 to 300 BCE (Ancient). Within this time, there were quite a few wars. The Persian Wars lasted 30 years into the Golden Age, ending with a tentative

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    comedic and tragic masks commonly associated with drama have a long history as icons of the theatre. However, these masks also have associations with less tangible aspects of performance. While their raw function as performance aids seems obvious, closer inspection of ancient vase paintings and votive sculpture suggests the theatrical mask was closely linked to the ritualized metamorphosis that the Ancient Greeks perceived at the foundations of dramatic portrayal. This less-corporeal function positioned

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    controlled your everyday life (“Religion”). Ancient Greece contained many important events and the people created many important things. Greek theater was very important as well, it was a great source of entertainment for its people. Ancient Greek theater was influenced by the time period in that it involved a lot of mythological gods and goddesses as evidence in the play The Curmudgeon by Meander. One thing Ancient Greece was known for was its religion. In Greece the religion was based mostly on myths

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    Ancient Greek Theater

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    Ancient Greek Theater Imagine this following scene: You are sitting in a dark, fairly crowded large room. There are hundreds of other people, in hundreds of other seats surrounding you. In front of you, there is a large stage, with people acting out a play. Lights, music, and different sound effects set the mood of the play for you to understand more clearly what is going on. With these certain conventions, viewer can get a real grasp of a story in which several actors are trying to portray

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    Ancient Greek Theatre Architecture

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    look for our beginnings. Whether we look for them in our personal life or in our professional life, we still look for them. As I was looking around the theatre recently, I was looking at and wondering where the idea of the theatre came from. Rather, who built it and why it is built the way it is. Who made the first one? Where do the roots of the theatre lay? All very good questions that I hope will be answered. In the beginning of time, man did not understand the complex workings of the universe.

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    Religious Ceremonies In Theatre

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    Theatre as a Religious Ceremony “The drama in Greece was inextricably bound up with religious feeling and religious observance.” (Cheney 33) The citizens of the Greek states were the first European communities to raise dramatic performances to the level of an art. Furthermore, the Greek playwrights still exercise a potent creative force, and many modern dramatists find strong relationships between these legendary themes and modern conditions. The Greek’s religion is wholly responsible for the creation

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    The Function of the Greek Chorus

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    York, NY: Penguin Group, 1984. The Oresteia. Print. Muller, Karl O. History of the Literature of Ancient Greece. Vol. I. London: Baldwin and Cradock, 1840. 308. Web. 25 Mar. 2012. . Schlegel, August W. Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature. Trans. John Black. 2004. Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation. Web. 2 Apr. 2012. . Weiner, Albert. "The Function of the Tragic Greek Chorus." Theatre Journal 32.2 May (1980): 212. Web. 25 Mar. 2012. . Aeschylus, The Libation Bearers. Trans. Robert

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    there can see all the details of his masks. Few Noh theatres have a second floor, where you can see the full stage. You can view the full stage from the second floor. Only few Noh theaters have seating on the second floor. Traditionally, shogun and feudal lords viewed performances from this direction. It is the conventional seating. Older Noh theatres have tatami (flooring made of rice straw) rather than seats, while almost all large modern Noh theatres are made with fixed seats. Outdoor performances

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    ANTIGONE

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    ANTIGONE HISTORY OF GREEK THEATRE 25 hundred years ago, two thousand years before Shakespeare, western theatre was born in Athens Greece. Between 600 and 200bc the ancient Athenians created a theatre culture whose form, technique and terminology have lasted to millennia and they created plays that are still considered amongst the greate3st works of world drama. By 600bc Greece was divided into two states. The most prominent city state was Athens where at least 150,000 people live. It

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    Essay On Greek Theater

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    In the year 700 BC, the city-state of Athens, Greece became institutionalized. During this time Athens, gained much military power, which allowed the city-state to become significant culturally and politically. During the institutionalization of this Athens, the city-state took part in festival called Dionysia. The Dionysia festival honored the god Dionysus. Before some of the performances, goats were killed and offered up as sacrifices to Dionysus. During the Dionysia festival the central events

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    heard from offstage and the chorus debates saving them. In both cases the violence is described, but never shown, characteristic of Greek tragedy. The subject matter and the way Euripides presents Medea is what makes this play atypical of Greek theatre. Euripides was not especially popular during his lifetime. Aristophanes and others constantly mocked him in their comedies because of his condemnation of war during the Peloponnesian War. Euripides was also skeptical of the standard religious practices

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    dramatic activity, one could plausibly argue that it had originated in the religious cults of the then Greek society. Spectacles and all forms of performance were introduced in many Greek cities, especially the city of Athens. Thus, the theatre of ancient Greece evolved out of religious rites, often to the accompaniment of uninhibited ritualized dancing and song. Musical performance and recitations formed an integral part to the religious festivals. Drama thus became a vehicle of religious expression

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    Oedipus the King

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    figure. Knowing the background of Greek culture and theater will help one to better understand Sophocles’ Oedipus the King. The Greek tragedies of the fifth and fourth centuries BC that remain today were almost all written for performance in the Theatre of Dionysos at Athens (Didaskalia, par. 1). This major annual festival held in honor of Dionysus, the god of wine, came about because of the “problematic relationship that Greeks believed existed between gods and humans” (Perseus Digital Library)

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    Greek Theater and Tragedy

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    Many ancient civilizations witnessed Greek theater and tragedy as the world’s first theatrical performances. Tragedy comes from the Greek word Tragos and Ole meaning goat song. The dithyramb, a song and dance performed in honor of the god Dionysus, was performed at a ceremony in Athens; it told the story of Dionysus’s life and his many adventures. Throughout the years the playwrights added things other than Dionysus’s life to the performance. They added other gods and some hero’s that made a name

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    The Essence of Tragedy in The Book of Job and Oedipus Rex In the search for the essence of the tragedy, The Book of Job and Oedipus Rex are central. Each new tragic protagonist is in some degree a lesser Job or Oedipus, and each new work owes an indispensable element to the Counselors and to the Greek idea of the chorus. The Book of Job, especially the Poet's treatment of the suffering and searching Job, is behind Shakespeare and Milton, Melville, Dostoevski, and Kafka. Its mark is on all

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    The Chorus as a Homonym

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    In Jean Anouilh’s Antigone and in Euripides’s Medea the Chorus is both a tool for characterization and representation of theme; however, the ways they function in their respective plays are noticeably different. The differences in the way the Choruses function in each respective play make the name of the character “the Chorus” a homonym, same name different meaning. The Chorus in Antigone functions to incorporate the technique of metatheatre. The purpose of metatheatre is to provide a separation

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