Free The Waste Land Essays and Papers

Page 1 of 50 - About 500 essays
  • the waste land

    2230 Words  | 9 Pages

    The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot Part 1 - Burial of the Dead April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Winter kept us warm, covering Earth in forgetful snow, feeding A little life with dried tubers. Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade, And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten And drank coffee, and talked for an hour. Bin gar keine Russin, stamm'

  • Waste Land Essay: Superficiality in The Waste Land

    1656 Words  | 7 Pages

    Superficiality in The Waste Land The Waste Land is concerned with the 'disillusionment of a generation'. The poem was written in the early 1920's, a time of abject poverty, heightening unemployment and much devastation unresolved from the end of WW1 in 1918. Despite this, or because of it, people made a conscientious effort to enjoy themselves. In doing so they lost their direction, their beliefs and their individuality. They were victims of the class system which maintained a system of privilege

  • Lost in the Waste Land

    880 Words  | 4 Pages

    coming back from war. It leaves only a waste land of minds, bodies, and spirits. This was a reality in which T. S. Eliot lived and this is why he wrote The Waste Land. It was through this poem that Eliot was able to show the world the true cost and consequence of war. It was his private testament of the cost of war, the truth of its aftermath, and it became "the most influential poetic work of the 20th century" (poets.org) To understand The Waste Land, the reader should gain a better understanding

  • Waste Land Essay: Journey Through The Waste Land

    1541 Words  | 7 Pages

    T. S. Eliot drafted The Waste Land during a trip to Lausanne, Switzerland to consult a psychologist for what he described as mild case of nerves. He sent the manuscript to Ezra Pound for editing assistance. Between them the draft was extensively edited and published in 1922. As a modernist poet, Eliot struggled to remove the voice of the author from his work but the work is still a reflection of the author’s interpretation. He paints the picture as he sees it for the readers to view and interpret

  • The Waste Land: Allusions

    1328 Words  | 6 Pages

    T.S Eliot’s poem, The Waste Land, is written in the mood of society after World War I. By using these allusions, The Waste Land reflects on mythical, historical, and literary events. The poem displays the deep disillusionment felt during this time period. In the after math of the great war, in an industrialized society that lacks the traditional structure of authority and belief, in the soil that may not be conductive to new growth (Lewis). Eliot used various allusions that connected to the time

  • Identifying with the Waste Land

    973 Words  | 4 Pages

    T.S Eliot’s The Waste Land frustrates the reader with a complexity so dense that he or she feels lost. This frustration arises out of the poem’s fragmented structure of the characters, place, and time which gives the reader an insight into the civilization following World War I and the authors’ chaotic state of mind. He shows how modern life appears to be fragmented and disordered through the shifting images, points of view and alternating periods of time. T.S Eliot uses allusions to myths, history

  • Free Waste Land Essays: Underlying Myths in The Waste Land

    582 Words  | 3 Pages

    Underlying Myths in The Waste Land The underlying myths that Eliot uses to provide a framework for "The Waste Land" are those of the Fisher King and the Grail Quest. Both of these myths come to Christian civilization through the ancient Gaelic tradition. Neither is found in the Bible, but both were important enough to Europeans that there was a need to incorporate them into the new European mythology, and so the stories became centered on the story of the death and resurrection of Jesus. Other

  • The Waste Land and the Hero

    3859 Words  | 16 Pages

    The Wasteland, based on the texts I have read, is a varied and diverse environment of barrenness and death. In my life, and in society today, the Wasteland is not much different; the barrenness is one of mind and soul, and we have the same lack of knowledge about death now that these authors did when recording their thoughts on paper. A hero is needed in this harsh environment, to guide the multitude, or merely set the example for all others to follow. Though few characters meet the qualifications

  • Free Waste Land Essays: The Lifeless Land

    507 Words  | 3 Pages

    The Waste Land:  Lifeless Land As The Waste Land begins, Eliot enters into the barren land, which the audience journeys across with the author through the course of the poem. "The roots that clutch" immediately evoke a feeling of desperation. Roots in the rocky soil Eliot describes are a base from which to grow; just as roots in plants gain nourishment from soil, these roots "clutch" infertile ground, desperately seeking something to gain from nothing. The question "what branches grow" suggests

  • Literary Criticism Of The Waste Land

    1038 Words  | 5 Pages

    Analysis of “The Waste Land” When T.S Eliot wrote “The Waste Land”, just four years after World War 1, he was deeply troubled by the true nature of the people around him. People seemed too willing to abandon their cultures and submit to a rule of the mob. This coupled with the nearly nine million causalities of the war caused Eliot and many other artists to rethink their ideas of art and literature. In the resulting influx of experimental styles in art, T.S Eliot created “The Waste Land” to express his

Previous
Page12345678950