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    Canturberry Tales  - The Nun's Priest's Tale    This is a charming little fable cleverly disguised as a barnyard story.  In the first twenty-six lines, the setting of the story is described as a small farm, belonging to a very plain widow and her two daughters.  The widow is a simple woman of good heath, who has managed to make it despite her unfortunate circumstance of being slightly impoverished.  In lines twenty-seven through forty-four we are introduced to the story's main character, Chanticleer

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    The Hidden Meaning of The Nun's Priest's Tale It has been suggested that a "Chaucer tale exploits the nature of its genre but also draws attention to the ideological biases and exclusions inherent in the genre"2. In my opinion The Nun's Priest's Tale is a wonderful example of Chaucer testing the bounds of his chosen genre - in this case the beast fable. What is a beast fable? Obviously a tale about animals, but one where "animals are used as embodiments or caricatures of human virtues, vices

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    as to the character of the Nun’s Priest. Only in the prologue to his tale do we finally get a glimpse of who he might be, albeit rather obtusely. As Harry Bailey rather disparagingly remarks: “Telle us swich thyng as may oure hertes glade./Be blithe, though thou ryde upon a jade” (p.235, ll2811-2812). I say this cautiously because much criticism has surrounded the supposed character of the Nun’s Priest, his role in the tale, and his relationship to the Canterbury Tales as a whole. One example, in

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    Chaucer's "The Nun's Priest's Tale" is at once a fable, a tale of courtly love, and a satire mocking fables and courtly love traditions. To this end, Chaucer makes use of several stylistic techniques involving both framing and content. The tale begins and ends with "a poor widwe somdeel stape in age" (line 1), but the majority of the content involves not the widow but the animals on her farm, in particular an arrogant rooster name Chauntecleer. The first mention of the main character does not

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    Summary and Analysis of The Nun's Priest's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Nun's Priest's Tale: The Knight interrupts the Monk's Tale, for as a man who has reached a certain estate, he does not like to hear tales of a man's fall from grace. He would rather hear of men who rise in esteem and status. The Host refuses to allow the Monk to continue, instead telling the Nun's Priest to tell his tale. The Nun's Priest's Tale: The Nun's Priest tells a tale of an old woman who had a

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    The Nun’s Priest’s Tale The tale told by the Nun’s Priest is a fable or story with animals as the main characters and usually ends with a moral of some sort. This tale takes place on the farm of and old, poor widow. All that she posses can be summed up in a few lines. It is among her possessions that we find the rooster Chanticleer, who’s crowing is more precise than any clock and a voice that was jollier than any church organ. The tale is told from the point-of-view of Chanticleer. One night

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    The Beast Fable and Romance in the Nun's Priest Tale Chaucer utilized many literary forms when composing his Canterbury Tales. Among these forms he utilized were the beast fable and romance. We find elements of both of these forms in the Nun's Priest's Tale. Yet Chaucer was a decidingly original poet. When he took these forms he made them his. He often diverged from the accepted norms to come up with stories that were familiar to the fourteenth century reader yet also original. First let

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    in The Pardoners Tale and The Nun's Priest's Tale Irony is the general name given to literary techniques that involve surprising, interesting,or amusing contradictions. 1  Two stories that serve as excellent demonstrations of irony are "The Pardoners Tale" and " The Nun's Priest's Tale," both from Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Although these two stories are very different, they both use irony to teach a lesson. Of the stories, "The Pardoners Tale" displays the most

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    Nuns Priest's Tale

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    Chanticleer a nice poor old guy, father of two daughters, and husband of many wives. The article “Nun’s Priest’s Tale” states, “The protagonist of this mock-heroic story is Chanticleer, a rooster with seven wives, foremost among them the hen Pertelote. Pertelote dismisses Chanticleer's dream of being attacked and tells him to go about his business.” Chanticleer has one very close wife, and he tells her what he dreamt but she just thinks that he is sick. The rooster believes his dream means something

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    Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, many familiar medieval literary genres may be found. A very common tale that Chaucer uses is the fabliau, which is best portrayed in "The Miller's Tale." Another comedic genre, the beast fable, creates a moral through the use of animals instead of humans. In the Nun's Priest's Tale, Chaucer uses this fable to great effect. A third type of tale, the Breton lays, uses "The Franklin's Tale" to bring out the nobility of love. All three of these tales bring comedy and structure

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