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    Self-Made Misery in Blake’s London The poet William Blake paints a picture of the dirty, miserable streets of London in his poem, "London". He describes the wretched people at the bottom of the society, the chimney-sweeps, soldiers, and harlots. These people cry out from their pain and the injustices done to them. The entire poem centers around the wails of these people and what they have become due to wrongs done to them by the rest of society, primarily institutions such as the church and

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    “The mind-forg 'd manacles I hear” the speaker is sharing with the reader that the people’s minds are not free, but in fact restrained or held back by their various situations. For most during this time, money was something they never, many were making little to no money.

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    everywhere: In every cry of every man, In every infant’s cry of fear In every voice, in every ban, The mind-forg’d manacles I hear. ▀Here everybody is enslaved by "mind-forg'd manacles." An individual’s self has become mind forged just like the “charter’d streets”. manacles are perhaps symbolic of the constrained living conditions. The 'mind forg'd manacles' is really what this stanza , and even the whole poem is about. (However, possibly the most potent image of entrapment/

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    William Blake viewed English society as being bound with “mind-forg’d manacles” (London 2:4), the limits or social norms keeping us from being totally free, demonstrating Blake’s disapproval of England’s societal structure. In fact, Blake saw many problems within English society such as the power of the church, child labor, and monarchical structure. Moreover, Blake’s view was so profoundly negative that he looked at the French Revolution as the start of a new world. The French Revolution’s act of

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    London

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    voice, In every ban,/ The mind-forged manacles I hear." In the final line of the first stanza, the speaker says that he hears the mind-forged manacles. The mind-forged manacles are not real. By this I mean that they are created in the mind of those people whom the speaker sees on the streets. Those hopeless and depressing thoughts, in turn imprison the people whom the speaker sees on the street. When the speaker says that he can hear the "mind-forged manacles" he doesn't mean that he can literally

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    Poems by Willliam Blake

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    to the melancholy of poor people, which is common in today?s society. The strongest metaphorical image portrayed in ?London? is without a doubt, the ?mind-forg?d manacles? on the last line of the second stanza. Also in another poem by Blake called ?The Tyger?, the image of ?the forge? appears where ?manacles? are produced. Manacles for the hands and shackles for the legs, these would be seen on prisoners being moved from one place to another, this was quite common in London at Blake?s time

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    Mr. Blake’s views on Upon Westminster Bridge I read Mr Wordsworth’s poem. I was dismayed by his views on London. I was horrified when I read the first line. “Earth has not anything to show more fair,” I believed he would have experienced beautiful views since he was brought up in the Lake District. He obviously has not seen London in 1794. I have lived in London for many years of my life. I have seen people in poverty from the poorest parts of London to people in mansions the richest places

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    mind forg’d manacles I hear”. It can be suggested that Blake compares the working class to prisoners in Newgate prison suffering from the conditions of their environment, but, significantly, Blake uses the potent image of “mind forg’d manacles” to indicate the mental chains instilled in the minds of the proletariat through physical force by the bourgeoisie who want to maintain the status quo. Perhaps, it could be suggested the use of the irregular stressed words “mind forg’d manacles” which portrays

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    1 Near where the charter'd Thames does flow, 2 And mark in every face I meet, 3 Marks of weakness, marks of woe. 4 In every cry of every Man, 5 In every Infant's cry of fear, 6 In every voice, in every ban, 7 The mind-forg'd manacles I hear: 8 How the Chimney-sweeper's cry 9 Every blackning Church appalls, 10 And the hapless Soldier's sigh, 11 Runs the blood down Palace walls. 12 But most thro' midnight streets I hear 13 How the youthful Harlot's curse 14

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    Appreciation for London by William Blake The first stanza of the poem London opens with the image of Blake as he wanders “thro' each charter'd street”. Blake selected the word “charter'd” to convey various images in the readers mind. The immediate image the audience will visualize is that the streets of London were mapped out. However, on further examination the reader can determine that Blake had another meaning for the word. The word charter is also a document bestowing certain rights

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