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    Women, as stated by Gilbert and Gubar in The Madwoman in the Attic, are often portrayed in literature as one of two binary opposites, ‘monstrous’ or ‘angelic’. Arguing throughout their theory that women are either represented as the ‘sweet dumb Snow White’ character or the ‘fierce mad Queen’2, Gilbert and Gubar expose how the female protagonist can never be understood as anything in between these two states. This dichotomy is clearly demonstrated in Felecia Hemans’s ‘The Indian City’, throughout

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    the Attic. Born and raised in London, and brought up Christian he was as far away from being Okonkwo as I am as a white middle class American female. If Gilbert and Gubar are accusing women of feeling out of place writing in what then was a man’s field of expertise then Achebe masterfully channels the feminine madness into Things Fall Apart by writing a culture of strong independent women masked by silent passive girls. Chinua Achebe analyzes a culture he is not accustomed with. The Madwoman in the

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    Exposing the Role of Women in The Madwoman in the Attic In their book The Madwoman in the Attic, Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar address the issue of literary potential for women in a world shaped by and for men. Specifically, Gilbert and Gubar are concerned with the nineteenth century woman and how her role was based on her association with the symbols of angels, monsters, or sometimes both. Because the role of angel was ideally passive and the role of monster was naturally evil, both limited

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    rest of the public sphere was a welcoming place for women in general (Abrams 1). A woman's place was in the domestic sphere (Abrams 3). She was the so-called angel of the house as Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar point out in their work The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination: The angel in the house is a woman in white […] her dutiful chastity manifested

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    The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination "And the lady of the house was seen only as she appears in each room, according to the nature of the lord of the room. None saw the whole of her, none but herself. For the light which she was was both her mirror and her body. None could tell the whole of her, none but herself" (Laura Riding qtd. by Gilbert & Gubar, 3). Beginning Gibert and Gubar’s piece about the position of female writers during the nineteenth

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    The reveal of the “madwoman in the attic” is one of the most famous narratives within Jane Eyre paving the way for modern contemporary readers to sympathize more freely with the character, not only with I later interpretations but with symbolic readings. Within chapter 26, after their unsuccessful wedding, Rochester admits to a horrified Jane that he has imprisoned his wife Bertha because she is mad. Readers only encounter Bertha briefly within Bronte’s Jane Eyre when she is in the deepest depths

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    Use of Attics in Literature

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    The Phenomenology of Space--Attic Memories and Secrets Since Gilbert and Gubar's The Madwoman in the Attic, critics have assumed that attics house madwomen. But they use that concept as a metaphor for their thesis, that women writers were isolated and treated with approbation. In most literature, attics are dark, dusty, seldom-visited storage areas, like that of the Tulliver house in The Mill on the Floss--a "great attic under the old high-pitched roof," with "worm-eaten floors," "worm-eaten shelves

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    other hand, there is the "madwoman in the attic" who breaks free from the constraints set upon women. This woman is seen as a "monster" and "sexually fallen" for simply desiring to have a life outside of her family (Bressler 178). Mrs. Mallard falls into both categories. Though she feels oppressed by her husband, she stills acts as the "angel," faithfully staying by his side despite her unhappiness. However, Chopin provides the reader with small indications of the "madwoman" even before Mrs. Mallard

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    Jane Eyre

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    itself, and this character is Bertha the madwoman in the attic. Both of these novels are similar in that they follow the journey of a female character faced with many obstacles, however the two pieces of writing contrast in how each of their characters develop. Wide Sargasso Sea is an interesting text in that it is split up into two narrators, the first being what seems to be like the voice of Rochester, and the second being Bertha, the madwoman in the attic of Jane Eyre. Bertha is known as Antoinette

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    Bertha Rochester’s introduction into Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte had an immense impact on her present life and aligned with the disappointments in her past. Bertha Rochester is the madwoman who lives in Mr. Rochester’s attic. She lives there because she is Mr. Rochester’s wife who was kept a secret from Jane. Mr. Rochester married her, not knowing what he was getting himself into it. Bertha Rochester is also the sister to Mr. Mason who was bitten and stabbed by her. Her existence and secret marriage

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    Criticism In Jane Eyre

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    Chapman Kuykendall Mrs.Jones A.P. Literature Period 7 29 March 2016 Jane Eyre Social Justice Criticism Class, Food, and Proto-Feminism in Nineteenth Century England The social and political environment in nineteenth century England from the perspective and hindsight of modern norms and policies looks grim and indentured. Criticising a culture from hindsight may seem redundant, but in the words of Edmund Burke, “those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it”. Looking at a former culture

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    face with the fact that Mr. Rochester is already married to a woman who is still alive, and her name is Bertha Mason. This is Bertha’s formal introduction into the story, in the 26th chapter. She was introduced previously, however, as “the madwoman in the attic”. It was said that Bertha was downright insane, and she was in the care of Grace Poole. Her previous introduction was back in chapter 20 as “Grace Poole’s own goblin” (ch 20 pg 219). That was when she attacked Mason, her brother. As more of

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    In the Dust

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    John Steinbeck, and Charlotte Brontë, this faint wisp of a theme transforms into a palpable flesh-and-blood vessel for a powerful statement on the human condition. Through the vivid images of a girl made of glass, a gentle giant, and a madwoman locked in the attic, these three virtuosos of literature depict the prey of society as acutely human. Because of their various disabilities, Laura Wingfield in The Glass Menagerie, Lennie Small in Of Mice and Men, and Bertha Mason in Jane Eyre are dealt unjust

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    The Sargasso Sea as an Underlying Metaphor in Wide Sargasso Sea Why did Jean Rhys name her novel about the Creole madwoman in the attic from Jane Eyre after a mysterious body of water in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean? As there is no mention made of the Sargasso Sea in the novel itself, one might wonder why she chose to title her novel after it. In a 1958 letter to a friend and colleague, she describes her changing titles for the novel: “I have no title yet. ‘The First Mrs. Rochester’ is not right

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    Creole as a Third Space in Jean Rhys’ Novel

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    Jean Rhys writes Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) as a prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre (1847) in order to give life to Bertha Mason, a Jamaican creole who is locked in the attic as a madwoman by her English husband, Rochester. Rhys thinks that Bertha is completely undermined and negated in Bronte’s novel. Bronte’s silences over Bertha’s identity and history enforce Rhys to break the unspoken and deliberately neglected white creole’s identity; and give her a voice that humanizes this supposedly

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    ‘Surface Appearance is not Everything’

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    “Nineteenth-century Britain has been described as the ‘first industrial nation’ (Mathias 1983)” (Guy & Small. 2011: 13). Britain’s industrialisation during the eighteenth and nineteenth-century brought about significant changes transforming society as the technological advancements affected all aspects of life, that of cultural, social, political and economic circumstances. In particular the modern advancements of steam power technology expanded the industrial processes of printing which stimulated

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    Eyre, Donaldson argues in her article, “The Corpus of the Madwoman: Towards a Feminist Disability Studies Theory of Embodiment and Mental Illness.” that the “romanticizing” of “madness” by feminist writers and critics, is “unhelpful” as it portrays mental illness as a metaphor to women 's rebellion. First, let us understand where Donaldson is coming from. Her argument stems from Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar 's, Madwoman in the Attic, “ a now classic text of early feminist criticism” as Donaldson

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    In their 1979 work titled The Madwoman in the Attic, Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar discuss the difficulties faced by Victorian women attempting to write in a patriarchal society. Gilbert and Gubar describe the “anxiety of authorship” experienced by female writers who thus believe they are not capable of creating a successful work. J.M. Coetzee’s 1986 novel Foe, follows its protagonist Susan Barton as she experiences such anxiety in early eighteenth century England. Barton’s anxieties as well

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    The Lovemad Woman in Nineteenth Century Literature The lovemad woman was a very important part of nineteenth-century literature. The lovemad woman, originally characterized as a female who becomes insane due to the departure of her lover, was an important character in literature. From Antigone to Ophelia to Jane Eyre, the lovemad woman is seen throughout literature in various contexts. The definition of such a woman changed as the definition of what is it to be a woman in general changed throughout

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    As Jane allows the reader to be privy to her innermost thoughts, she illustrates a self that cannot be accessed, a sort of ungovernable otherness that is blocked by her outer persona. Gilbert and Gubar write in The Madwoman in the Attic that maddened doubles function as asocial surrogates for docile selves (xi). Bertha Mason, on the other hand is the uncontrollable other of Jane’s compliant exterior, and functions as Jane’s surrogate. To be considered a proper lady at this

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