Free The House of Mirth Essays and Papers

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Free The House of Mirth Essays and Papers

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    It is easy to understand why Edith Wharton would have been horrified at the revelation of her assertion that her novel, The House of Mirth, was an indictment of New York’s social elite. While Wharton was very much apart of the society in which she criticized in her novel, she if anyone knew about the precariousness one’s social status in New York hung by. The theme that comes across the most strongly in her work is one of everyone serving a utilitarian function in order for the society to run. The

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    end in fall or failure, often as an ironic commentary on social values of self-improvement or success. A character may get what he or she desires, but be faced with the unexpected consequences of that desire” [Prompt]. In Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, Lily Bart’s ending is an ironic rise because her meeting with Nettie and paying back her debts gives her the strength and courage to chase after her own happiness, but Lawrence Selden’s ending is an ironic fall because of his failure to overcome

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    Sharayah Callais Ms. Saxon Eng. 233-ND1 4/01/14 Social Senselessness and Conviction in the House of Mirth The journey to find the social senselessness and conviction in the novel, The House of Mirth can fittingly start with a look at the society in which Lily Bart schemes for societal acceptance and accomplishment. The way one perceives the social circle in the The House of Mirth is that it is full of elegance and comfort, but has descended itself into a distasteful manipulative and nasty type of

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    Edith Wharton’s “The House of Mirth” mainly describes the need of a woman to be married to a wealthy man and how she attempts to find the most appropriate suitor. “The House of Mirth” also observes the tedious physical and mental decline of a young woman who, because of her own weakness and indecisiveness, falls from social distinction into poverty and griminess. The story presents a cruel measure of reality and ends quite sadly. Instead of marrying and living happily, Lily weakens slowly and commits

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    actions are completely driven by her desire to fit into the upper class part of society and her need to have money to successfully do this. The actions she partakes in to achieve these goals are sometimes harshly judged by other characters, but The House of Mirth seems to almost draw sympathy for Lily from the fact that she is stuck in this role she cannot remove herself from. Even through showing other life paths like Gerty Farish’s, Lily’s options for an independent life where she can live the way she

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    Throughout the book House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, the main character, Lily Bart, rejects both Simon Rosedale, a rich social outcast, and Lawrence Selden, a less profitable but well liked lawyer. Lily realises, through her rejections, that she does not have the potential she thought to have had and that because of her inflated views of herself, she is now doomed to be a part of the working class. Her choice to reject both men has been understood as selfish but might also have a small sense of molarity

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    novels in the same time period she lived and therefore incorporates the glitz and glamour of the late 19th century and early 20th century into some of her novels. Wharton’s characters typically face both internal and external dilemmas; in The House of Mirth, Wharton shows the ugly side of living up to the standards of upper-class society, while Ethan Frome illustrates the hardships of being confined in a dreary, old town. Wharton captivates her readers through the use of moral seriousness and setting

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    Lily as the Goddess Diana in The House of Mirth One of the tragedies in The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton is that Lily Bart is unable to marry Laurence Selden and thereby secure a safe position in society. Their relationship fluctuates from casual intimacy to outright love depending on how and where Selden perceives Lily. Selden sees a beautious quality in Lily Bart that is not present in any of the other women in the novel. This mysterious beauty that is so often alluded to, in addition to

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    Jane Eyre vs House of Mirth Lily The novels, Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, and House of Mirth, by Edith Wharton, contain many similarities and differences of which I will discuss in this essay. The focus will be on the main characters of each book, Jane Eyre, and Lily Bart and will include important points and ideas demonstrated in these novels. To begin, Jane, from Charlotte Bronte’s novel, Jane Eyre, was an orphan who was raised by an upper-class family who resented her and did not

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    humanity, an author can create an immediate connection between the reader and the story through use of tragedy. Both The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton and “Babylon Revisited” by F. Scott Fitzgerald use the main characters, Lily and Charlie, to portray a theme of tragedy brought about by fate, which is relatable to every person who has experienced loss in their life. In The House of Mirth Lily Bart, the main character is a society miss at the mercy of the world that she lives in. Lily’s main problem is

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