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    The House of Mirth

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    Lily Bart lived in the upper part of New York society. She loves nice things and extravagance. However, throughout the House of Mirth Lily plays a game. She wants to be virtuous, stay in the social circle, and have the money to keep up with the demands of her so called friends. She involves herself so much into the social life she loses all chance of gaining her riches virtuously or through true love. She misses her chances inevitably: from Percy to her dear aunt to her indecisiveness of men and

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    The House of Mirth

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    The House of Mirth Lily and Selden are on a walk together, Lily having broken her second planned meeting with Percy Gryce in order to see Selden. The excuse she gave Gryce was that she had a headache that first prevented her from going to church and second from going on a walk with him. She instead convinces him to join the other guests and go to the Van Osburgh home in Peekskill. Selden tells Lily that he views everything she does as having been premeditated. She disagrees, saying she is

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    Edith Wharton’s novel, The House of Mirth, is the story of a girl named Lily Bart trying to find a place for herself in society. Wharton used allusion throughout the book to aid the reader in understanding the events of the narrative. The following essay will highlight three allusions Wharton used, and explain how they helped the reader to understand the corresponding events from the book. About halfway through the story, Lily’s friend Mrs. Bry decides to host a fashion show, of sorts, to establish

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    Naturalism in The House of Mirth

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    Naturalism in The House of Mirth Challenging the strict deterministic confines of literary naturalism, which hold that "the human being is merely one phenomenon in a universe of material phenomena" (Gerard 418), Edith Wharton creates in The House of Mirth a novel which irrefutably presents the human creature as being subject to a naturalistic fate but which conveys a looming sense of hope that one may triumph over environment and circumstance if one possesses a certain strength of will or a

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    and to pay her friends back the debt she acquired. The possibilities of this novel being popularly known have many different scenarios. The citizens of this culture found a way to relate to the story plot and the ultimate portrayal of lives. The House of Mirth gives two separate sides of knowledge pertaining to that of an intellectual working woman who was from the lower class society supporting herself; also known as the new woman, to the scandalous woman trying to save her spot on the higher classed

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    House Of Mirth Analysis

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    1) What is the symbolic value of money in the novel? In the House of Mirth, there are many symbols, a larger one being money. Money is represented and symbolized as the “leader of society”, the one responsible that governs all women., and also the evil force driving people into certain beliefs or thoughts. Many examples of this are shown throughout the book, especially when various rumors are spread around by Bertha. Bertha is the prime instigator of these rumors, as she is incredibly wealthy. This

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    The motif of gambling on bridge is used in the House of Mirth to develop the theme that there is a natural desire for personal autonomy and that rejection from society often accompanies this quest for independence. For Lily, gambling during bridge gives her the illusion of freedom. Realizing that the money she wins from bridge is hers to spend, she is driven to “risk higher stakes at each fresh venture” (26). Once Lily gets a taste of independence, she can not stay away from it. Playing bridge provides

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    Hands, Social Structures, and Female Fragility in The House of Mirth Human hands are unfailingly present in everyday human life and art, either visual or literary. Despite the prominent presence of hands, hands are seldom noticed or appreciated in any walk of life; accordingly, literary analysis sweeps the mentions of hands under the rug. One writer, Sonoko Toyda, even connects hands to symbolize the very heart of a female and the head of a man (XI). Authors often write fictional woman

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    Lily's House Of Mirth

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    The tableaux vivants scene in Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth is pivotal to the understanding of Lily Bart as a character. The passage not only highlights her precarious state in high-society, but it also contains one of the only instances where Lily feels truly comfortable and confident. Over the course of the description of Lily’s staging of her own tableaux, she goes from being a piece of art on display, to an artist carefully working to exhibit her own beauty. However, the contradictory reception

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    Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth serves as a strict model of etiquette for high society in the Gilded Age. It teaches one the intricate art of keeping up appearances and assimilating into the fickle leisure class. At the same time, the novel’s underlying purpose is to subtly critique this social order. Lily Bart’s perpetual, although often reluctant quest for financial stability and mass approval is a vehicle for demonstrating the numerous absurdities and

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    The novels Persuasion and House of Mirth shared many common themes. Both families in each novel had challenges that they had to face. These challenges were mainly within their social class. No matter when in time or where in place, somehow you are left with thinking whether or not you are good enough for someone or if someone is good enough for you based on where your ranked on the social class ladder. Both novels share a way of identifying people by their wealth. Both of which result in negative

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    husband and live in the elite society that leads to her inevitable demise, in Edith's novel The House of Mirth (CITATION). Although many of the characters in the novel were in an elite and prominent society, they were possibly the most morally corrupt people since women married men for their wealth, and men expected women to constantly act proper and sophisticated. Edith Wharton’s modern novel The House of Mirth demonstrates why people in the

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    Lily's Choice in The House of Mirth

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    Lily's Choice in The House of Mirth Near the beginning of The House of Mirth, Wharton establishes that Lily would not indeed have cared to marry a man who was merely rich: "she was secretly ashamed of her mothers crude passion for money" (38). Lily, like the affluent world she loves, has a strange relationship with money. She needs money to buy the type of life she has been raised to live, and her relative poverty makes her situation precarious. Unfortunately, Lily has not been trained

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    House of Mirth - The Nature of Nature

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    House of Mirth  - The Nature of Nature Nature, whether in the form of the arctic tundra of the North Pole or the busy street-life of Manhattan, was viewed by Naturalist writers as a phenomena which necessarily challenged individual survival; a phenomena, moreover, which operated on Darwin's maxim of the "survival of the fittest." This contrasted sharply with the Romantic view, which worshipped Nature for its beauty, beneficence and self-liberating powers. In Edith Wharton's The House of

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    “When someone has been given much, much will be required in return; and when someone has been entrusted with much, even more will be required” (New Living Translation, Luke 12:48). In The House of Mirth, Lily Bart, a 29-year-old member of society, was not given much money after the death of her parents. However, she was entrusted with “inherited obligations” (Wharton 32), an awareness of the expected societal role she must fulfill, and an expectation to utilize her beauty to assure a secure future

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    The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton

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    Edith Wharton’s novel of manners The House of Mirth is a satirical representation of upper society. The personification of this satire is the character Lily Bart. The leader is led to believe that Lily is trapped by her upbringing in higher society, which is seen in Wharton’s use of characterization, imagery, and motifs throughout the novel. Wharton’s characterization of Lily Bart focuses on her beauty as the reason for her acceptance into high society. During the tableaux vivants at the Welly Brys’

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    Objectification of Women in The House of Mirth Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth is an affront to the false social values of fashionable New York society.  The heroine is Lily Bart, a woman who is destroyed by the very society that produces her.  Lily is well-born but poor.  The story traces the decline of Lily as she moves through a series of living residences, from houses to hotel lodgings.  Lily lives in a New York society where appearances are all.  Women have a decorative function in such

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    House of Mirth Journal House of Mirth is a realistic fiction novel written by acclaimed writer Edith Wharton about the struggle of a young woman in New York high society. Wharton wrote this novel during the Gilded Ages when cities in America were becoming places of both extreme prosperity and poverty . The industrialization was taking place and the stock market was booming. However, the wealth distribution was becoming more uneven, and the streets were filled with hungry impoverished people. Wharton’s

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    usually tragic but tell readers the fate of the characters. Realist novels have plausible events, with cause and effect in their stories — what the characters desire and the consequences they receive because of that. Realism in the novel, The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, was clearly shown through Lily Bart's character with its ironic ending that had both her fall and rise as a character. She was known for her beauty in the novel; she made various mistakes in the process of entering the high social

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    end in fall or failure, often as an ironic commentary on social values of self-improvement or success. A character may get what he or she desires, but be faced with the unexpected consequences of that desire” [Prompt]. In Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, Lily Bart’s ending is an ironic rise because her meeting with Nettie and paying back her debts gives her the strength and courage to chase after her own happiness, but Lawrence Selden’s ending is an ironic fall because of his failure to overcome

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