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    humans have a prominent source in their lives that deliver a sense of security, that will undoubtedly lead to more happiness than freedom is capable of. In The Grand Inquisitor, the conflict between freedom and security is one of the main reasons for Ivan’s dissent from Christianity. The difference between Jesus Christ’s point of view and the Grand Inquisitor’s is the value that each places on freedom and security. The way that Christ responds to the three temptations is assumed to display the importance

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    example, both Louisa and the Inquisitor both felt “chained” to something. Louisa felt chained to her engagement in a similar the way the Inquisitor felt chained to the rules and regulations of the church. Also, the Inquisitor is suddenly disturbed by the presence of Christ just as Louisa is disturbed by the presence of her fiance, Joe Dagget. Both characters are happily living their lives when they are abruptly interrupted. Furthermore, in the story, The Grand Inquisitor, the church was viewed as

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    The Grand Inquisitor

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    “The Grand Inquisitor”, by Feodo Dostoevsky, is a parable wherein the main character (the Grand Inquisitor, or GI) makes repeated attempts to dissuade the populous from following the teachings of Christ. The story is appropriately set in Seville, Spain during the time of the Inquisition where heretics against the will of the Spanish monarchy were routinely burned at the stake. During this time, the sixteenth century, there was also talk about the fact that Christ had not returned and many people

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    freedom through “The Brothers Karamazov”, found in his short story “The Grand Inquisitor”. Dostoevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor” is perhaps one of his greatest works ever known in modern literature because Dostoevsky’s philosophy is aimed towards free will, religion and human nature. For decades many have criticized the short story because Dostoevsky gives a profound understanding of the confrontation between Jesus and the Grand Inquisitor. Also, the story ends in ambiguity leaving the readers with wonder

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    The Truth About Orthodox Christianity

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    As described in The Grand Inquisitor by Dostoevsky The writings of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Helen Ellerbe show substantial evidence that the orthodox Christians did in fact steal from humanity the divine freedom it was promised by Jesus Christ. This thesis is supported in Dostoevsky's "The Grand Inquisitor" from his book The Brothers Karamazov. The dark side of Christian history by Helen Ellerbe also supports this theory. The Inquisition itself shows credibility to the theory that orthodox Christianity

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    “Nothing has ever been more insupportable for a man and a human society than freedom.” –The Grand Inquisitor” “Above all, don't lie to yourself. The man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point that he cannot distinguish the truth within him, or around him, and so loses all respect for himself and for others. And having no respect he ceases to love.” - Father Zosima. These two quotes voice the polarized philosophies that impregnate the book, The Brothers Karamazov. Ivan

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    Ivan Karamazov rejected God by rejecting the world, which is corrupted by suffering and cruelty. In Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s book-chapter “Rebellion,” Karamazov showed complexity and depth in their understanding and analyzing of human suffering. The question that led him to reject God focused on God allowing suffering to exist in the world, especially that of children who have not sinned. Karamazov rejected a world founded by suffering and cruelty, therefore rejecting God in light of catastrophic suffering

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    Theodicy and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov The problem of reconciling an omnipotent, perfectly just, perfectly benevolent god with a world full of evil and suffering has plagued believers since the beginning of religious thought. Atheists often site this paradox in order to demonstrate that such a god cannot exist and, therefore, that theism is an invalid position. Theodicy is a branch of philosophy that seeks to defend religion by reconciling the supposed existence of an omnipotent

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    The Grand Inquisitor The Grand Inquisitor reflects Fyodor Dostoevsky interest in religious and political issues. Dostoevsky uses the voices of his characters to express his views on the legitimacy of the Roman Catholic Church and role of religion in society. The story centers around the conflict between the Grand Inquisitor and Jesus. Jesus returns to Earth during the Spanish Inquisition, when in which Jews and Muslims were forced to convert to Christianity and were murdered if not devoted in

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    Life without Love – The Malady of Death The Brothers Karamazov, is a novel which contains many themes presenting outlooks on faith, life, and love. The character of Ivan is the cornerstone which Dostoevsky uses to present these outlooks. It is suggested that Ivan suffers from “The Malady of Death”. The idea of the malady of death is presented in the novel, The Malady of Death, by Marguerite Duras. The malady of death can be thought of as a disease or disorder caused by a sort of spiritual malaise

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