Free The Canon's Yeoman's Tale Essays and Papers

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Free The Canon's Yeoman's Tale Essays and Papers

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    and Analysis of The Canon's Yeoman's Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Canon's Yeoman's Tale: When the story of Saint Cecilia was finished and the company continued on their journey, they came across two men. One of them was clad all in black and had been traveling quickly on their horses; the narrator believes that he must be a canon (an alchemist). The Canon's Yeoman said that they wished to join the company on their journey, for they had heard of their tales. The Host asked if the

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    managed to accomplish this daunting task. Despite being unfinished, The Canterbury Tales - written by Geoffrey Chaucer - is one these renowned works. Chaucer manages to unify this particular collection of short stories through the use of the Miller, a member of the cast. Chaucer use of figurative language, satire, and tone allow for this works’ unified frame. The first technique that Chaucer uses in The Canterbury Tales is the Miller’s consistent depiction as a fool through figurative language. Chaucer

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    woman

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    man of the cloth, is also recalcitrant yet seems like a humble shepherd or old grandma. The Canterbury Tales open with the General Prologue in a description of spring returning. As the April rains come, as the flowers and trees bloom, and as the birds begin to sing, people begin to feel the need and want of embarking on a pilgrimage. Before the narrator of the Canterbury Tales continues with his tale he comes across and meets a group of people who are on one of these pilgrimages. He changes his plans

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    Canterbury Tales In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer writes a prologue in which characters are given at face value.  Then, he writes tales that are spoken by these characters.  Perhaps Chaucer is commenting that people should not judge others by their outward appearance because the differences in the outward character of Chaucer’s travelers are often greatly different than the personality that is shown through their tales. The Prioress is one character that appears differently than her tale reveals

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    occupation and even into more depths of their lives. This is what makes us enjoy the work even more. It’s very interesting that this idea of describing characters has followed us all the way into the 21st century. For example From the Canterbury Tales, The Prologue by Geoffrey Chaucer, Chaucer delves deep into describing each character. Although there are many diverse characters mentioned in the general prologue my three favorite are the Knight, the Monk and the Doctor. To begin, the Knight is

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    When it comes to The Canterbury Tales, nothing is safe from scrutiny. When the idea of doing a pedagogical project was introduced for this class, my mind immediately began buzzing with ideas of what I should do. One day I hope to have a class of my own, so being able to approach an assignment in a pedagogical way is something I’ve looked forward to for a while. Though we’ve read many great stories in this class, The Canterbury Tales is one that’s become quite a favorite of mine. Since this story

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    Depending on the character described in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales clean, cleanness, and cleanse are used to mean different things. Generally, these words are related to spiritual or physical cleanliness, but can also describe well-made items, physical attributes, and disease. In the passage “Hir over-lippe wyped so clene” (Chaucer GP line 133), the word clene draws attention to the nun’s fastidious mannerisms. Rather than spiritual cleanliness - which a nun should devote herself to – clene

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    Canterbury Tales When Geoffrey Chaucer undertook the writing of The Canterbury Tales, he had a long road ahead of him. He intended to tell two stories from each of thirty pilgrims on the way to Canterbury, and then two more from each pilgrim on the way back from Canterbury. Of these, he completed only twenty-four. However, in these tales, Chaucer depicts both the pilgrims and their stories with striking realism. In "The Nun's Priest's Tale," "The Canon's Yeoman's Tale," "The Friar's Tale," "The

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    different ways in which dishonesty is shown and explained. During the middle ages many tales were based around a curtain lesson, or characteristics, and in this case dishonesty. “I say, this canon took out of his sleeve a bar of silver evil make him grieve! That weighed an ounce, and listen now to me a while I recount his cursed trickery!” (Chaucer,pg7,line 1223-1226). In this tale “The Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale” many examples of dishonesty are shown within the Yeoman. The character Yeoman is an alchemist

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    The Canterbury

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    The Canterbury The Canterbury Tales begins with the introduction of each of the pilgrims making their journey to Canterbury to the shrine of Thomas a Becket. These pilgrims include a Knight, his son the Squire, the Knight's Yeoman, a Prioress, a Second Nun, a Monk, a Friar, a Merchant, a Clerk, a Man of Law, a Franklin, a Weaver, a Dyer, a Carpenter, a Tapestry-Maker, a Haberdasher, a Cook, a Shipman, a Physician, a Parson, a Miller, a Manciple, a Reeve, a Summoner, a Pardoner, the Wife of

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