The Bell Essays

  • For Whom The Bell Tolls

    813 Words  | 2 Pages

    Part II The title For Whom the Bell Tolls symbolizes the uncertainty of life and destiny, where the main character in this story finds himself in a series of unpredictable situations that are beyond his control. The only certain event in life is death and knowing that this may happen to anyone at any time, renders the protagonist powerless against destiny, which he approaches with a fatalistic disposition. Part III For Whom the Bell Tolls takes place in Spain, during the bloody civil war, between

  • For Whom The Bell Tolls

    665 Words  | 2 Pages

    many themes that can be associated with the novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls. The story has love, hate, rivalry, duty, war, and several more topics of concern. However, war plays the most important role among all of the possible themes. There is war all around the characters, but it is not limited to battles or physical wars. Wars appear between ideologies, guerrilla band members, beliefs, inner emotions, and decisions. In For Whom the Bell Tolls, Hemingway shows, through war, an example of a ¡°good¡±

  • Bell Hooks

    816 Words  | 2 Pages

    receive an equal education. Two arguments which present interesting views on higher education are bell hook’s “Keeping Close to Home'; and Adrienne Rich’s “What Does a Woman Need to Know?'; Hooks views higher education with a concern for the underprivileged, whereas Rich views it with a concern for women. Of the two works, I personally do not agree with Rich’s argument. Bell hooks views higher education to be a time in which we find ourselves and learn more about who we

  • For Whom The Bell Tolls

    837 Words  | 2 Pages

    The Disillusionment of Hemingway with War Hemingway uses certain repetitive themes and ideas in his book, For Whom the Bell Tolls, which relate to the grander dogma that he is trying to teach. By using these reoccurring ideas, he is able to make clear his views on certain issues and make the reader understand his thoughts. The most notable of this reoccurring theme is that of war. Hemingway uses the war concept as paradoxical irony in this book, to tell the reader what the thinks about war. It is

  • The Bell Jar

    662 Words  | 2 Pages

    Sylvia Plath’s autobiography, The Bell Jar, tells the story of Plath’s own mental breakdown and suicide attempt, as well as her recovery and eventual reentrance into the outside world. The Bell Jar shows the transition of Plath as a young, hopeful girl into a cynical, suicidal woman. The main character whom represents Plath, Esther Greenwood, is first shown as an aspiring writer who is full of dreams and whose life is brimming with opportunities. As Esther becomes more and more depressed, Plath then

  • The Bell Jar

    1270 Words  | 3 Pages

    The Bell Jar People's lives are shaped through their success and failure in their personal relationships with each other. The author Sylvia Plath demonstrates this in the novel, The Bell Jar. This is the direct result of the loss of support from a loved one, the lack of support and encouragement, and lack of self confidence and insecurity in Esther's life in the The Bell Jar. It was shaped through her success and failures in her personal relationships between others and herself. Through life

  • Bell Theory Poem Analysis

    730 Words  | 2 Pages

    Bell Theory The poem “Bell Theory", written by Emily Jungmin Yoon is portraying her dissatisfaction with how she been treated in the United States. She is basically stereotyped daily and made fun of for mispronunciations of words. She uses poetic devices such as imagery, repetition, and metaphors to symbolize her disapproval and emphasize her melodramatic chaotic life. Jungmin also used things such as real life references for example tensions between Japan and Korea to depict how stereotypes are

  • The Environment, Bell Hooks, and Feminist Spirituality

    982 Words  | 2 Pages

    The Environment, Bell Hooks, and Feminist Spirituality The Environment: The environment is constantly being sacrificed for food production, toxic dumps, wood distribution, military testing, and other things such as these. And as usual, the root lies in profit. The corporations can’t afford to be concerned with the future well being of the earth and it’s dwellers. Also, environmental pollution can be connected to racism and classism because it is the poor communities that are used for toxic

  • Ernest Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls

    1676 Words  | 4 Pages

    In Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls, the recurring images of the horse and the airplane illustrate one of the major themes of the novel. The novel's predominant theme is the disintegration of the chivalric order of the Old Spanish World, as it is being replaced by the newer technology and ideology of the modern world. As a consummate artist, Hemingway, in a manner illustrating the gothic quality of his work, allows the bigger themes of For Whom the Bell Tolls to be echoed in the smaller units

  • Themes and Characters in For Whom the Bell Tolls

    884 Words  | 2 Pages

    Themes and Characters in For Whom the Bell Tolls For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway, is a contemporary novel about the realities of war. The novel is wrought with themes of life and stark direct writing. The characterization in the story is what comprises the intricacy of the underlying themes within the tale. The story itself is not complex, but the relationships of the characters with the environment and with each other coupled with Hemingway's command of description and understanding

  • role of women in for whome the bell tolls

    1017 Words  | 3 Pages

    In Hemingway’s novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls, the role of women is something one can not avoid noticing. Although only two women appear in the book, the distinction of their characters, and their influence on the situation are apparent from their introduction. Pilar, even from the beginning is constantly referred to as being like a man. One of her main features and personality traits is that she has the confidence, knowledge, and look of a man. This is apparently a praisable quality because the

  • Alexander Graham Bell

    1576 Words  | 4 Pages

    Alexander Graham Bell, a man who best known for inventing the telephone. Most people don’t know he spent the majority of his life teaching and helping the deaf. Educating the hearing impaired is what he wished to be remembered for. Bell was born on March 3, 1847, in Edinburgh, Scotland. His mother was a painter of miniature portraits and also loved to play the piano even though she was nearly deaf. Aleck’s mother knew that he had a talent for music and always encouraged him to play (Matthews 12)

  • Clive Bell and the Formalist Theory

    1861 Words  | 4 Pages

    Clive Bell and the Formalist Theory “Art is a recurring form of human practice. Some have argued that all human societies have shown evidence of artistic activities.” (Carroll 5) Man has long created art, this much is certain. However, man has never ultimately defined art. There are so many things which qualify as art and as many qualities to each piece that trying to find answers only seems result in more questions. The formalist theory of art, as present by Clive Bell, makes an attempt

  • For Whom the Bell Tolls: A Study of Psychology

    1218 Words  | 3 Pages

    exposure except through writers such as Ernest Hemingway. In For Whom the Bell Tolls, Hemingway captivates the realism of war through his own eyes. Drawing from his own observation and experiences as an ambulance driver, Hemingway shows the psychological damage of war through the destruction of human lives, uncommitted relationships, and lack of confidence. Hemingway’s novel is so true to his own that many consider For Whom the Bell Tolls an autobiographical piece of writing with different characters

  • The Bell Curve

    1220 Words  | 3 Pages

    Through readings and class discussion, I have gained a tremendous amount of insight about the characteristics of racism and oppression, which exist within society. After reading the article The Bell Curve, by Richard J. Henderson, and Charles Murray, I was enraged. This article was clearly written with a white, male’s perspective, and rarely takes into consideration the cultural, structural and political strengths of oppression and racism. In order to fully understand welfare and the precipitants

  • the bell jar

    1145 Words  | 3 Pages

    The book “The Bell Jar” by Silvia Plath was different from other books assigned through-out my time at high school. Most of the other books, including for example “Of Mice and Men”, Lord of the Flies”, and “The Heart of darkness” were stories about mostly men and how they all turned against each other in some way and acted like animals instead of humans, and in the end of all of them someone dies. The book “The Bell Jar” though is without a doubt my favorite so far because it is about a female and

  • The Bell Jar

    611 Words  | 2 Pages

    The mood of the story, The Bell Jar is very gloomy and depressing. Throughout the book, the main character Esther struggles with her mental stability. She can't quite get a grip on what her role is as a woman in society during the late 40’s and early 50’s. She struggles with the fact that she is most likely going to end up as a stay at home mom or house wife. She doesn’t like this idea. During the beginning of the book Esther is doing an internship over the summer for a magazine in New York. She

  • Alexander Graham Bell

    811 Words  | 2 Pages

    Alexander Graham Bell Alexander Graham Bell is a name of great significance in American history today. A skillful inventor and generous philanthropist, he astounded the world with his intuitive ideas that proved to be both innovative and extremely practical in the latter half of the 19th century. Most notable, of course, are Bell's work in developing the telephone and his venerable life-long endeavor to educate the deaf. Originally, his only wish was to help deaf people overcome their difficulty

  • Bone Black by Bell Hooks

    921 Words  | 2 Pages

    Bone Black In the book Bone Black, Bell Hooks gives a vivid look into her childhood. She starts off by talking about a quilt that her mother gave her from her mother. She thinks that this is special because her mother gave it to her and not one of her other sisters. Then she goes into describing how the children in her family never knew that they were poor until they grew up. They liked the dolls that they played with and the food that they ate. They never wondered why they didn’t have the

  • Patriarchy In The Bell Jar

    620 Words  | 2 Pages

    Living in a Bell Jar: The Confinement of the Female Voice in Plath’s “The Bell Jar” written by Ashley Kress tells of the reflection of gender roles in The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Kress talks about how feminist criticism talks about how it challenges the patriarchy in culture and literature. She talks about how The Bell Jar was a window to for Plath to show women that they can break away from the 1950’s type patriarchy just like Esther Greenwood. Two of Kress’ main topics is that how The Bell Jar is